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  • 1
    Abstract: PURPOSE: There is inconsistent evidence regarding the relationship between higher intake of nuts, being an energy-dense food, and weight gain. We investigated the relationship between nut intake and changes in weight over 5 years. METHODS: This study includes 373,293 men and women, 25-70 years old, recruited between 1992 and 2000 from 10 European countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Habitual intake of nuts including peanuts, together defined as nut intake, was estimated from country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Body weight was measured at recruitment and self-reported 5 years later. The association between nut intake and body weight change was estimated using multilevel mixed linear regression models with center/country as random effect and nut intake and relevant confounders as fixed effects. The relative risk (RR) of becoming overweight or obese after 5 years was investigated using multivariate Poisson regressions stratified according to baseline body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: On average, study participants gained 2.1 kg (SD 5.0 kg) over 5 years. Compared to non-consumers, subjects in the highest quartile of nut intake had less weight gain over 5 years (-0.07 kg; 95% CI -0.12 to -0.02) (P trend = 0.025) and had 5% lower risk of becoming overweight (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98) or obese (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-0.99) (both P trend 〈0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Higher intake of nuts is associated with reduced weight gain and a lower risk of becoming overweight or obese.
    Type of Publication: Journal article epub ahead of print
    PubMed ID: 28733927
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  • 2
    Keywords: MORTALITY ; RISK ; III COLON-CANCER ; insulin ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; VITAMIN-D ; MILK INTAKE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: We investigated whether prediagnostic reported intake of dairy products and dietary calcium is associated with colorectal cancer survival. METHODS: Data from 3,859 subjects with colorectal cancer (42.1% male; mean age at diagnosis, 64.2 +/- 8.1 years) in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort were analyzed. Intake of dairy products and dietary calcium was assessed at baseline (1992-2000) using validated, country-specific dietary questionnaires. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to calculate HR and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for colorectal cancer-specific death (n = 1,028) and all-cause death (n = 1,525) for different quartiles of intake. RESULTS: The consumption of total dairy products was not statistically significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer-specific death (adjusted HR Q4 vs. Q1, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.97-1.43) nor that of all-cause death (Q4 vs. Q1, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.98-1.36). Multivariable-adjusted HRs for colorectal cancer-specific death (Q4 vs. Q1) were 1.21 (95% CI, 0.99-1.48) for milk, 1.09 (95% CI, 0.88-1.34) for yoghurt, and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.76-1.14) for cheese. The intake of dietary calcium was not associated with the risk of colorectal cancer-specific death (adjusted HR Q4 vs. Q1, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.81-1.26) nor that of all-cause death (Q4 vs. Q1, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.84-1.21). CONCLUSIONS: The prediagnostic reported intake of dairy products and dietary calcium is not associated with disease-specific or all-cause risk of death in patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. IMPACT: The impact of diet on cancer survival is largely unknown. This study shows that despite its inverse association with colorectal cancer risk, the prediagnostic intake of dairy and dietary calcium does not affect colorectal cancer survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24917183
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BODY-WEIGHT ; OBESITY ; DIET ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PARTICIPANTS ; RATIONALE ; PROCESSED FOODS ; NUTRITION TRANSITION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dietary trans fatty acids and weight gain, and the evidence remains inconsistent. The main objective of the study was to investigate the prospective association between biomarker of industrial trans fatty acids and change in weight within the large study European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Baseline plasma fatty acid concentrations were determined in a representative EPIC sample from the 23 participating EPIC centers. A total of 1,945 individuals were followed for a median of 4.9 years to monitor weight change. The association between elaidic acid level and percent change of weight was investigated using a multinomial logistic regression model, adjusted by length of follow-up, age, energy, alcohol, smoking status, physical activity, and region. RESULTS: In women, doubling elaidic acid was associated with a decreased risk of weight loss (odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55-0.88, p = 0.002) and a trend was observed with an increased risk of weight gain during the 5-year follow-up (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.97-1.56, p = 0.082) (p-trend〈.0001). In men, a trend was observed for doubling elaidic acid level and risk of weight loss (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.66-1.01, p = 0.062) while no significant association was found with risk of weight gain during the 5-year follow-up (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.88-1.33, p = 0.454). No association was found for saturated and cis-monounsaturated fatty acids. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that a high intake of industrial trans fatty acids may decrease the risk of weight loss, particularly in women. Prevention of obesity should consider limiting the consumption of highly processed foods, the main source of industrially-produced trans fatty acids.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25675445
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  • 4
    Keywords: DIAGNOSIS ; RISK ; BREAST-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; nutrition ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; REPRODUCTIVE HISTORY ; RECREATIONAL PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; RESEARCH FUND/AMERICAN INSTITUTE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors are advised to follow lifestyle recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body fatness proposed by the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer prevention. Previous studies have demonstrated that higher concordance with these recommendations measured using an index score (the WCRF/AICR score) was associated with lower cancer incidence and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between pre-diagnostic concordance with WCRF/AICR recommendations and mortality in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: The association between the WCRF/AICR score (score range 0-6 in men and 0-7 in women; higher scores indicate greater concordance) assessed on average 6.4 years before diagnosis and CRC-specific (n = 872) and overall mortality (n = 1,113) was prospectively examined among 3,292 participants diagnosed with CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (mean follow-up time after diagnosis 4.2 years). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality. RESULTS: The HRs (95% CIs) for CRC-specific mortality among participants in the second (score range in men/women: 2.25-2.75/3.25-3.75), third (3-3.75/4-4.75), and fourth (4-6/5-7) categories of the score were 0.87 (0.72-1.06), 0.74 (0.61-0.90), and 0.70 (0.56-0.89), respectively (P for trend 〈0.0001), compared to participants with the lowest concordance with the recommendations (category 1 of the score: 0-2/0-3). Similar HRs for overall mortality were observed (P for trend 0.004). Meeting the recommendations on body fatness and plant food consumption were associated with improved survival among CRC cases in mutually adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS: Greater concordance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body fatness prior to CRC diagnosis is associated with improved survival among CRC patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25948112
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