Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: HIGH-DOSE CHEMOTHERAPY ; ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY ; CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA ; PEDIATRIC-ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; outcome prediction ; CHILDRENS CANCER GROUP ; BETA-CATENIN STATUS ; CRANIOSPINAL RADIATION-THERAPY ; STEM-CELL RESCUE ; RISK MEDULLOBLASTOMA
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma is curable in approximately 70 % of patients. Over the past decade, progress in improving survival using conventional therapies has stalled, resulting in reduced quality of life due to treatment-related side effects, which are a major concern in survivors. The vast amount of genomic and molecular data generated over the last 5-10 years encourages optimism that improved risk stratification and new molecular targets will improve outcomes. It is now clear that medulloblastoma is not a single-disease entity, but instead consists of at least four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT/Wingless, Sonic Hedgehog, Group 3, and Group 4. The Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013 meeting, which convened at Bunker Bay, Australia, brought together 50 leading clinicians and scientists. The 2-day agenda included focused sessions on pathology and molecular stratification, genomics and mouse models, high-throughput drug screening, and clinical trial design. The meeting established a global action plan to translate novel biologic insights and drug targeting into treatment regimens to improve outcomes. A consensus was reached in several key areas, with the most important being that a novel classification scheme for medulloblastoma based on the four molecular subgroups, as well as histopathologic features, should be presented for consideration in the upcoming fifth edition of the World Health Organization's classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Three other notable areas of agreement were as follows: (1) to establish a central repository of annotated mouse models that are readily accessible and freely available to the international research community; (2) to institute common eligibility criteria between the Children's Oncology Group and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology Europe and initiate joint or parallel clinical trials; (3) to share preliminary high-throughput screening data across discovery labs to hasten the development of novel therapeutics. Medulloblastoma Down Under 2013 was an effective forum for meaningful discussion, which resulted in enhancing international collaborative clinical and translational research of this rare disease. This template could be applied to other fields to devise global action plans addressing all aspects of a disease, from improved disease classification, treatment stratification, and drug targeting to superior treatment regimens to be assessed in cooperative international clinical trials.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24264598
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Abstract: Multiple independent genomic profiling efforts have recently identified clinically and molecularly distinct subgroups of ependymoma arising from all three anatomic compartments of the central nervous system (supratentorial brain, posterior fossa, and spinal cord). These advances motivated a consensus meeting to discuss: (1) the utility of current histologic grading criteria, (2) the integration of molecular-based stratification schemes in future clinical trials for patients with ependymoma and (3) current therapy in the context of molecular subgroups. Discussion at the meeting generated a series of consensus statements and recommendations from the attendees, which comment on the prognostic evaluation and treatment decisions of patients with intracranial ependymoma (WHO Grade II/III) based on the knowledge of its molecular subgroups. The major consensus among attendees was reached that treatment decisions for ependymoma (outside of clinical trials) should not be based on grading (II vs III). Supratentorial and posterior fossa ependymomas are distinct diseases, although the impact on therapy is still evolving. Molecular subgrouping should be part of all clinical trials henceforth.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27858204
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging-with substantial inter-observer variability in the histopathological diagnosis of many tumour types. Here we present a comprehensive approach for the DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours across all entities and age groups, and demonstrate its application in a routine diagnostic setting. We show that the availability of this method may have a substantial impact on diagnostic precision compared to standard methods, resulting in a change of diagnosis in up to 12% of prospective cases. For broader accessibility, we have designed a free online classifier tool, the use of which does not require any additional onsite data processing. Our results provide a blueprint for the generation of machine-learning-based tumour classifiers across other cancer entities, with the potential to fundamentally transform tumour pathology.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29539639
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Abstract: Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited condition caused by germline mutations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene encoding p53, a transcription factor triggered as a protective cellular mechanism against different stressors. Loss of p53 function renders affected individuals highly susceptible to a broad range of solid and hematologic cancers. It has recently become evident that children and adults with LFS benefit from intensive surveillance aimed at early tumor detection. In October 2016, the American Association for Cancer Research held a meeting of international LFS experts to evaluate the current knowledge on LFS and propose consensus surveillance recommendations. Herein, we briefly summarize clinical and genetic aspects of this aggressive cancer predisposition syndrome. In addition, the expert panel concludes that there are sufficient existing data to recommend that all patients with LFS be offered cancer surveillance as soon as the clinical or molecular LFS diagnosis is established. Specifically, the panel recommends adoption of a modified version of the "Toronto protocol" that includes a combination of physical exams, blood tests, and imaging. The panel also recommends that further research be promoted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of these risk-adapted surveillance and cancer prevention strategies while addressing the psychosocial needs of individuals and families with LFS. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); e38-e45. (c)2017 AACRSee all articles in the online-only CCR Pediatric Oncology Series.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28572266
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...