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  • 1
    Abstract: Postnatal colonization of the body with microbes is assumed to be the main stimulus to postnatal immune development. By transiently colonizing pregnant female mice, we show that the maternal microbiota shapes the immune system of the offspring. Gestational colonization increases intestinal group 3 innate lymphoid cells and F4/80(+)CD11c(+) mononuclear cells in the pups. Maternal colonization reprograms intestinal transcriptional profiles of the offspring, including increased expression of genes encoding epithelial antibacterial peptides and metabolism of microbial molecules. Some of these effects are dependent on maternal antibodies that potentially retain microbial molecules and transmit them to the offspring during pregnancy and in milk. Pups born to mothers transiently colonized in pregnancy are better able to avoid inflammatory responses to microbial molecules and penetration of intestinal microbes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26989247
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-12-14
    Description: The largest mucosal surface in the body is in the gastrointestinal tract, a location that is heavily colonized by microbes that are normally harmless. A key mechanism required for maintaining a homeostatic balance between this microbial burden and the lymphocytes that densely populate the gastrointestinal tract is the production and transepithelial transport of poly-reactive IgA (ref. 1). Within the mucosal tissues, B cells respond to cytokines, sometimes in the absence of T-cell help, undergo class switch recombination of their immunoglobulin receptor to IgA, and differentiate to become plasma cells. However, IgA-secreting plasma cells probably have additional attributes that are needed for coping with the tremendous bacterial load in the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report that mouse IgA(+) plasma cells also produce the antimicrobial mediators tumour-necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and express many molecules that are commonly associated with monocyte/granulocytic cell types. The development of iNOS-producing IgA(+) plasma cells can be recapitulated in vitro in the presence of gut stroma, and the acquisition of this multifunctional phenotype in vivo and in vitro relies on microbial co-stimulation. Deletion of TNF-alpha and iNOS in B-lineage cells resulted in a reduction in IgA production, altered diversification of the gut microbiota and poor clearance of a gut-tropic pathogen. These findings reveal a novel adaptation to maintaining homeostasis in the gut, and extend the repertoire of protective responses exhibited by some B-lineage cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3487691/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3487691/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fritz, Jorg H -- Rojas, Olga Lucia -- Simard, Nathalie -- McCarthy, Douglas D -- Hapfelmeier, Siegfried -- Rubino, Stephen -- Robertson, Susan J -- Larijani, Mani -- Gosselin, Jean -- Ivanov, Ivaylo I -- Martin, Alberto -- Casellas, Rafael -- Philpott, Dana J -- Girardin, Stephen E -- McCoy, Kathy D -- Macpherson, Andrew J -- Paige, Christopher J -- Gommerman, Jennifer L -- 67157-3/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- 89783-2/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 114972/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 67157/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 89783/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- MOP 9862/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- R00 DK085329/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R00 DK085329-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- Z01 AR041148-03/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AR041148-08/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 11;481(7380):199-203. doi: 10.1038/nature10698.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1A8, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158124" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bone Marrow Cells/cytology ; Cell Lineage ; Cells, Cultured ; Chimera/immunology ; Citrobacter rodentium/immunology ; Coculture Techniques ; Female ; Germ-Free Life ; Granulocytes/cytology/metabolism ; Immunity, Innate/immunology ; Immunoglobulin A/biosynthesis/*immunology ; Intestinal Mucosa/cytology/immunology ; Intestine, Small/*cytology/*immunology/microbiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; Monocytes/cytology/metabolism ; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/biosynthesis/deficiency/metabolism ; Phenotype ; Plasma Cells/*cytology/*immunology/metabolism ; Spleen/cytology ; Stromal Cells/cytology ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis/deficiency/immunology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Postnatal colonization of the body with microbes is assumed to be the main stimulus to postnatal immune development. By transiently colonizing pregnant female mice, we show that the maternal microbiota shapes the immune system of the offspring. Gestational colonization increases intestinal group 3 innate lymphoid cells and F4/80(+)CD11c(+) mononuclear cells in the pups. Maternal colonization reprograms intestinal transcriptional profiles of the offspring, including increased expression of genes encoding epithelial antibacterial peptides and metabolism of microbial molecules. Some of these effects are dependent on maternal antibodies that potentially retain microbial molecules and transmit them to the offspring during pregnancy and in milk. Pups born to mothers transiently colonized in pregnancy are better able to avoid inflammatory responses to microbial molecules and penetration of intestinal microbes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gomez de Aguero, Mercedes -- Ganal-Vonarburg, Stephanie C -- Fuhrer, Tobias -- Rupp, Sandra -- Uchimura, Yasuhiro -- Li, Hai -- Steinert, Anna -- Heikenwalder, Mathias -- Hapfelmeier, Siegfried -- Sauer, Uwe -- McCoy, Kathy D -- Macpherson, Andrew J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1296-302. doi: 10.1126/science.aad2571.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Maurice Muller Laboratories (DKF), Universitatsklinik fur Viszerale Chirurgie und Medizin Inselspital, Murtenstrasse 35, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland. ; Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland. ; Division of Chronic Inflammation and Cancer, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute for Infectious Diseases, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland. ; Maurice Muller Laboratories (DKF), Universitatsklinik fur Viszerale Chirurgie und Medizin Inselspital, Murtenstrasse 35, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland. andrew.macpherson@insel.ch.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989247" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies/immunology ; Escherichia coli/immunology ; Female ; Gastrointestinal Microbiome/*immunology ; Germ-Free Life ; Immune System/*growth & development/*microbiology ; Immunity, Innate/genetics/*immunology ; Immunity, Maternally-Acquired/genetics/*immunology ; Intestines/*immunology ; Lymphocytes/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Pregnancy ; Symbiosis ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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