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  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Environmental exposure ; infection ; ionizing radiation ; multiple myeloma ; occupational diseases ; risk factors ; United States
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The purpose of this population-based case-control study was to learn whether risk factors differ for the individual immunoglobulin types of multiple myeloma. In particular, we sought to determine whether IgA and IgG myeloma were related to a history of exposure to reported IgA- and IgG-stimulating conditions, respectively, or to a history of selected occupational and physicochemical exposures. The M-component immunoglobulin type was determined from immunoelectrophoresis as reported in medical records, and exposure status was obtained through in-person interviews. IgG (56 percent) and IgA (22 percent) M-components predominated. For 17 percent of cases, no peak was found on immunoelectrophoresis; they were presumed to have light-chain myeloma. Persons with these three types of myeloma did not differ with respect to distributions of age or race, but a somewhat higher proportion of light-chain cases were women (58 percent cf 45 percent of all other cases). Detailed analysis of the IgA and IgG subtypes provided little evidence that they differ with respect to prior immune stimulation or employment in several specific jobs. IgA myeloma, but not IgG myeloma, was associated modestly with a history of exposure to chest and dental X-rays. Our study provides little evidence that IgA and IgG myeloma differ with respect to the risk factors examined.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Asian-Americans ; China ; Japan ; migrants ; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma ; Philippines ; United States
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: We examined the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino residents of the United States to obtain further clues about the etiology of the disease. The age, race, and birthplace of residents of Hawaii, San Francisco/Oakland (California), and western Washington who had received a diagnosis of NHL during the period 1973–86 were obtained from population-based cancer registries, and a special tabulation from the 1980 Census was used to estimate the number of person-years at risk for each category of resident. The incidence of NHL in each of the Asian groups examined was 35 to 85 percent that of US-born Whites. However, there was no consistent trend of increasing incidence with increasing generation of residence in any of the groups. In Asian-Americans, the risk of small cell lymphocytic and plasmacytoid lymphoma was 10 to 85 percent that of Whites, although no clear trends of risk with generation of residence in the US were observed. They also were at a reduced risk of follicular lymphoma, and in Chinese and Japanese persons, the risk was lower in first generation than in later generation migrants (Chinese: Asian-born relative risk [RR]=0.11, US-born, RR=0.84; Japanese: Asian-born, RR=0.15, US-born, RR 0.36). The risk of diffuse lymphoma was similar in Chinese-and Japanese-Americans and US-born Whites. We conclude that, with the exception of follicular lymphoma, the basis for the relatively low incidence of NHL in Asian-Americans does not lie in exposures or characteristics that differ between the migrants themselves and their descendants.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Cancer causes & control 3 (1992), S. 391-392 
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Cancer causes & control 5 (1994), S. 479-483 
    ISSN: 1573-7225
    Keywords: Body build ; multiple myeloma ; obesity ; USA
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract An exploratory study was conducted of common clinical conditions as predictors of subsequent cancer in 143,574 outpatients of a health maintenance organization (in California, USA). An association was noted between obesity, diagnosed in 14,388 patients, and the subsequent development of multiple myeloma (MM) in up to 21 years (33 cases observed, 21.3 expected based on the experience of the entire cohort; standardized morbidity ratio=1.55, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]=1.06–2.17). This association was evaluated further in a second cohort of 163,561 multiphasic-checkup examinees followed up for as many as 24 years. Body mass index (BMI) at entry examination was associated positively with the incidence of MM in White men (e.g., relative risk [RR]=1.07, CI=1.01–1.15 per unit increase in BMI; and RR=1.68, CI=0.75–3.78, comparing the highest with lowest quartile). This association was absent in White women, partially confirmed in Black men and women (BMI quartiles two, three, and four showed higher risk than quartile one), and not explained by the presence of diabetes mellitus. The association was reduced or absent with BMI based on reported greatest adult-weight, and in White women was inverse with BMI based on reported lowest adult-weight. Among subjects with more than one checkup, increased risk was associated directly with weight loss among White men and associated inversely with weight gain among Black women. These findings suggest that body build or nutritional status may be involved in the development of MM by mechanisms that are presently unknown. If increased weight is a causal factor, weight loss occurs later after the disease process begins.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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