Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  121. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Chirurgie; 20040427-20040430; Berlin; DOC04dgch0161 /20041007/
    Publication Date: 2004-10-07
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  20. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Thoraxchirurgie; 20110922-20110924; Düsseldorf; DOCFV 1.6 /20110919/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-19
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Smoking is the largest cause of preventable death globally. Most smokers smoke their first cigarette in early adolescence. We took advantage of the widespread availability of mobile phones and adolescents' interest in appearance to develop a free photoaging app which is promoted via a poster campaign in secondary schools. This study aims to evaluate its effectiveness regarding smoking prevalence and students' attitudes towards smoking. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A randomised controlled trial is conducted with 9851 students of both genders with an average age of 12 years in grades 6 and 7 of 126 secondary schools in Germany. At present, cigarette smoking prevalence in our sample is 4.7%, with 4.6% of the students currently using e-cigarettes (1.6% use both). The prospective experimental study design includes measurements at baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 months postintervention via a questionnaire plus a random cotinine saliva sample at 24 months postintervention. The study groups consist of randomised schools receiving the Smokerface poster campaign and control schools with comparable baseline data (no intervention). The primary end point is the difference of change in smoking prevalence in the intervention group versus the difference in the control group at 24 months follow-up. Longitudinal changes in smoking-related attitudes, the number of new smokers and quitters and the change in the number of never-smokers will be compared between the two groups as secondary outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was obtained from the ethics committee of the University of Giessen and the ministries of cultural affairs, both in Germany. Results will be disseminated at conferences, in peer-reviewed journals, on our websites and throughout the multinational Education Against Tobacco network. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02544360, Pre-results.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27821601
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors associated with overall survival (OS) and neurological progression free survival (nPFS) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with brain metastases who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). From 2003 to 2015, 229 SCLC patients diagnosed with brain metastases who received WBRT were analyzed retrospectively. In this cohort 219 patients (95%) received a total photon dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The prognostic factors evaluated for OS and nPFS were: age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), number of brain metastases, synchronous versus metachronous disease, initial response to chemotherapy, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class and thoracic radiation. Median OS after WBRT was 6 months and the median nPFS after WBRT was 11 months. Patients with synchronous cerebral metastases had a significantly better median OS with 8 months compared to patients with metachronous metastases with a median survival of 3 months (p 〈 0.0001; HR 0.46; 95% CI 0.31-0.67). Based on RPA classification median survival after WBRT was 17 months in RPA class I, 7 months in class II and 3 months in class III (p 〈 0.0001). Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS 〈 70%) was significantly associated with OS in both univariate (HR 2.84; p 〈 0.001) and multivariate analyses (HR 2.56; p = 0.011). Further, metachronous brain metastases (HR 1.8; p 〈 0.001), initial response to first-line chemotherapy (HR 0.51, p 〈 0.001) and RPA class III (HR 2.74; p 〈 0.001) were significantly associated with OS in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis metachronous disease (HR 1.89; p 〈 0.001) and initial response to chemotherapy (HR 0.61; p 〈 0.001) were further identified as significant prognostic factors. NPFS was negatively significantly influenced by poor KPS (HR 2.56; p = 0.011), higher number of brain metastases (HR 1.97; p = 0.02), and higher RPA class (HR 2.26; p = 0.03) in univariate analysis. In this series, the main prognostic factors associated with OS were performance status, time of appearance of intracranial disease (synchronous vs. metachronous), initial response to chemotherapy and higher RPA class. NPFS was negatively influenced by poor KPS, multiplicity of brain metastases, and higher RPA class in univariate analysis. For patients with low performance status, metachronous disease or RPA class III, WBRT should be weighed against supportive therapy with steroids alone or palliative chemotherapy.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28560661
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is historically the standard of care for patients with brain metastases (BM) from small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although locally ablative treatments are the standard of care for patients with 1-4 BM from other solid tumors. The objective of this analysis was to find prognostic factors influencing overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS) in SCLC patients with single BM (SBM) treated with WBRT. METHODS: A total of 52 patients were identified in the authors' cancer center database with histologically confirmed SCLC and contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), which confirmed SBM between 2006 and 2015 and were therefore treated with WBRT. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed for OS analyses. The log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test was used to compare survival curves. Univariate Cox proportional-hazards ratios (HRs) were used to assess the influence of cofactors on OS and iPFS. RESULTS: The median OS after WBRT was 5 months and the median iPFS after WBRT 16 months. Patients that received surgery prior to WBRT had a significantly longer median OS of 19 months compared to 5 months in the group receiving only WBRT (p = 0.03; HR 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-4.73). Patients with synchronous disease had a significantly longer OS compared to patients with metachronous BM (6 months vs. 3 months, p = 0.005; HR 0.27; 95% CI 0.11-0.68). Univariate analysis for OS revealed a statistically significant effect for metachronous disease (HR 2.25; 95% CI 1.14-4.46; p = 0.019), initial response to first-line chemotherapy (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.97; p = 0.04), and surgical resection (HR 0.36; 95% CI 0.15-0.88; p = 0.026). OS was significantly affected by metachronous disease in multivariate analysis (HR 2.20; 95% CI 1.09-4.45; p = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: Univariate analysis revealed that surgery followed by WBRT can improve OS in patients with SBM in SCLC. Furthermore, synchronous disease and response to initial chemotherapy appeared to be major prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis revealed metachronous disease as a significantly negative prognostic factor on OS. The value of WBRT, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or surgery alone or in combination for patients with a limited number of BM in SCLC should be evaluated in further prospective clinical trials.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29085978
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: tumor ; AGENTS ; BLOOD ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; MODEL ; PERFUSION ; THERAPY ; VIVO ; imaging ; QUANTIFICATION ; VOLUME ; liver ; TISSUE ; TIME ; BLOOD-FLOW ; INDEX ; CONTRAST ; blood flow ; CONTRAST AGENT ; FLOW ; INJECTION ; BIOLOGY ; metastases ; US ; PARAMETERS ; tomography ; KINETICS ; LIVER METASTASES ; CONTRAST AGENTS ; POWER DOPPLER SONOGRAPHY ; INDUCED DESTRUCTION ; AGENT ; TRANSIT-TIME ; DESTRUCTION ; REAL-TIME ; tissue viability ; OCT ; ENHANCED SONOGRAPHY ; HEPATIC METASTASES ; HEPATIC PERFUSION ; low-MI ultrasound ; MATHEMATICAL-MODEL ; quantification of perfusion ; replenishment kinetics ; TUMOR PERFUSION ; ultrasound contrast agent
    Abstract: Low-MI (mechanical index) ultrasound allows real-time observation of replenishment kinetics after destruction ("flash") of ultrasound contrast agents (USCA). We developed an examination protocol and a mathematical model to quantify perfusion of liver tissue and hepatic metastases. Using a modified multivessel model, we attempted a consistent, physiological description of microbubble replenishment in liver tissue. Perfusion parameters were calculated, separately for the arterial and portal venous phase of liver perfusion, using an i.v. bolus injection of 2 x 2.4 mL SonoVue(R). The model was evaluated for 10 examinations of liver metastases using flash/low-MI imaging. In contrast to the established, exponential model, the new model consistently describes the sigmoid replenishment of USCA measured in vivo, using flash/low-MI imaging. Parameters for blood volume, blood velocity and blood flow in liver tissue and metastases can be calculated during the arterial and the portal venous phase after a CA bolus injection. The median arterial perfusion in the examined liver metastases was more than 2.5 times higher than in normal liver tissue, whereas the median perfusion during the portal venous phase was more than five times higher in the liver tissue than that in metastases. Microbubble replenishment measured with flash/low-MI US techniques can be consistently analyzed using the multivessel model, even after a bolus injection of USCA. This allows for the quantification of perfusion of liver tissue and hepatic metastases and provides promising parameters of tissue viability and tumor characterization. (C) 2004 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine Biology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15582235
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CARBON, DIFFUSING-CAPACITY, DIFFUSION, DISEASE, DISEASES, EVALUATE, EXCHANGE, fibrosis, function, FU
    Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate an optimized method for oxygen-enhanced MRI of the lung, using simultaneous electrocardiograph (ECG) and navigator triggering. To correlate oxygen-enhanced MRI with lung function tests assessing alveolar-capillary gas exchange. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 healthy volunteers (aged 20-32 years) and 10 patients (aged 37-87 years) with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) underwent oxygen-enhanced MRI and pulmonary functional tests (PFTs) assessing alveolar-capillary gas exchange. The paradigm room-air-oxygen-room-air was acquired with a nonselective inversion-recovery half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo sequence (inversion time = 1200 msec; acquisition time = 134.5 msec; slice thickness = 20 mm; matrix size = 128 X 128), using simultaneous double triggering (navigator plus ECG trigger). Cross-correlation was performed in regions of interest (ROIs) encompassing both lungs. The number of oxygen-activated pixels over the total number of pixels in the ROIs (OAP%) of volunteers and patients was compared. OAP%s were correlated with PFTs. Results: The mean OAP% of patients was significantly lower than that of volunteers (36.7 vs. 81.7, P = 0.001). OAP% correlated with the transfer lung factor for carbon monoxide (Tlco) (r = 0.64; P = 0.002), the transfer coefficient (Kco) (r = 0.75; P = 0.001), the arterial partial pressure (r = 0.77; P 〈 0.001), and the saturation (r = 0.70; P 〈 0.001) of oxygen. Conclusion: Navigator-triggered oxygen-enhanced MRI of the lung may have a potential role in the quantitative assessment of lung function in ILD
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17968900
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) demonstrate an exception in the treatment of brain metastases (BM), because in patients with SCLC whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) only is the preferred treatment modality. The purpose of this study was to develop a prognostic score for patients with brain metastases from SCLC treated with WBRT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted utilizing a single-institution, previously described, retrospective database of patients with SCLC who were treated with WBRT (n = 221). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to generate the "brain metastases from SCLC score" (BMS score) based on favorable prognostic factors: Karnofsky performance status (KPS 〉 70), extracerebral disease status (stable disease/controlled), and time of appearance of BM (synchronous). Furthermore, the disease-specific graded prognostic assessment score as well as the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) were performed and compared with the new BMS score by using the log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test. RESULTS: BMS score and RPA showed the most significant differences between classes (P 〈 .001). BMS score revealed a mean overall survival (OS) of 2.62 months in group I (0-1 points), 6.61 months in group II (2-3 points), and 12.31 months in group III (4 points). The BMS score also identified the group with the shortest survival (2.62 months in group I), and the numbers of patients in each group were most equally distributed with the BMS score. CONCLUSION: The new BMS score was more prognostic than the RPA and disease-specific graded prognostic assessment scores. The BMS score is easy to use and reflects known prognostic factors in contemporary patients with SCLC treated with WBRT. Future studies are necessary to validate these findings.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29373273
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: In 2007, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00016211) demonstrated a beneficial effect on overall survival (OS) with the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for extensive disease (ED) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Nevertheless, debate is ongoing regarding the role of PCI, because the patients in that trial did not undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before treatment. Also, a recent Japanese randomized trial showed a detrimental effect of PCI on OS in patients with negative pretreatment brain MRI findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the medical records of 136 patients with ED SCLC who had initially responded to chemotherapy and undergone PCI from 2007 to 2015. The outcomes, radiation toxicity, neurologic progression-free survival, and OS after PCI were analyzed. Survival and correlations were calculated using log-rank and univariate Cox proportional hazard ratio analyses. RESULTS: The median OS and the median neurologic progression-free survival after PCI was 12 and 19 months, respectively. No significant survival difference was seen for patients who had undergone MRI before PCI compared with patients who had undergone contrast-enhanced computed tomography (P = .20). Univariate analysis for OS did not show a statistically significant effect for known cofactors. CONCLUSION: In the present cohort, PCI was associated with improved survival compared with the PCI arm of the EORTC trial, with a nearly doubled median OS period. Also, the median OS was prolonged by 2 months compared with the irradiation arm of the Japanese trial.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28027850
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: measurement ; ANGIOGENESIS ; Germany ; PERFUSION ; CLASSIFICATION ; CT ; imaging ; INFORMATION ; QUANTIFICATION ; liver ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; computed tomography ; PATIENT ; BLOOD-FLOW ; INDEX ; primary ; INJECTION ; SIGNAL ; LESIONS ; PATTERNS ; DIFFERENCE ; metastases ; US ; tomography ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; LIVER METASTASES ; POWER DOPPLER SONOGRAPHY ; VASCULARIZATION ; contrast-enhanced ultrasound,liver metastases,arterial perfusion,low-MI imaging,SonoVue ; MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST ; SHU 508A
    Abstract: Rationale and Objectives: We investigated whether observing the arterial vascularization of liver metastases by contrast-enhanced ultrasound with low mechanical index (low-MI) imaging offers additional diagnostic information for the characterization of the liver lesions.Methods: Twenty nine patients with untreated liver metastases of different primaries were examined. Measurements were performed using a low frame rate, low-MI pulse inversion technique after injection of 2.4 mL SonoVue. The relative maximum signal intensity of the liver lesions related to the normal liver tissue was quantified. Ultrasound findings were compared with contrast-enhanced, dual-phase computed tomography (CT) using a pattern-based classification scheme.Results: Compared with contrast-enhanced CT, this modality better detects arterial perfusion. Metastases, even those usually considered hypovascularized, often showed homogeneous enhancement (66%) and higher arterial vascularization than normal liver tissue. CT did not show a comparable vascularization pattern (P 〈 0.001) or any similarly early signal intensity (P 〈 0.001).Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT may not be able to visualize short-lasting but large differences of the arterial perfusion of liver metastases, as does contrast-enhanced low-MI ultrasound. This offers new methods for their characterization and for monitoring of therapeutic effects
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15021325
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...