Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Abstract: Many cell lines derived from solid cancers can form spheroids, which recapitulate tumor cell clusters and are more representative of the in vivo situation than 2D cultures. During spheroid formation, a small proportion of a variety of different colon cancer cell lines did not integrate into the sphere and lost cell-cell adhesion properties. An enrichment protocol was developed to augment the proportion of these cells to 100% purity. The basis for the separation of spheroids from non-spheroid forming (NSF) cells is simple gravity-sedimentation. This protocol gives rise to sub-populations of colon cancer cells with stable loss of cell-cell adhesion. SW620 cells lacked E-cadherin, DLD-1 cells lost alpha-catenin and HCT116 cells lacked P-cadherin in the NSF state. Knockdown of these molecules in the corresponding spheroid-forming cells demonstrated that loss of the respective proteins were indeed responsible for the NSF phenotypes. Loss of the spheroid forming phenotype was associated with increased migration and invasion properties in all cell lines tested. Hence, we identified critical molecules involved in spheroid formation in different cancer cell lines. We present here a simple, powerful and broadly applicable method to generate new sublines of tumor cell lines to study loss of cell-cell adhesion in cancer progression.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29348601
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  34. Jahrestagung der Deutschsprachigen Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Verbrennungsbehandlung (DAV 2016); 20160113-20160116; Berchtesgaden, Deutschland; DOC16dav16 /20160112/
    Publication Date: 2016-01-13
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-10-18
    Description: Advances in optical spectroscopy and microscopy have had a profound impact throughout the physical, chemical and biological sciences. One example is coherent Raman spectroscopy, a versatile technique interrogating vibrational transitions in molecules. It offers high spatial resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities that make it a label-free tool for the non-destructive and chemically selective probing of complex systems. Indeed, single-colour Raman bands have been imaged in biological tissue at video rates by using ultra-short-pulse lasers. However, identifying multiple, and possibly unknown, molecules requires broad spectral bandwidth and high resolution. Moderate spectral spans combined with high-speed acquisition are now within reach using multichannel detection or frequency-swept laser beams. Laser frequency combs are finding increasing use for broadband molecular linear absorption spectroscopy. Here we show, by exploring their potential for nonlinear spectroscopy, that they can be harnessed for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and spectro-imaging. The method uses two combs and can simultaneously measure, on the microsecond timescale, all spectral elements over a wide bandwidth and with high resolution on a single photodetector. Although the overall measurement time in our proof-of-principle experiments is limited by the waiting times between successive spectral acquisitions, this limitation can be overcome with further system development. We therefore expect that our approach of using laser frequency combs will not only enable new applications for nonlinear microscopy but also benefit other nonlinear spectroscopic techniques.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ideguchi, Takuro -- Holzner, Simon -- Bernhardt, Birgitta -- Guelachvili, Guy -- Picque, Nathalie -- Hansch, Theodor W -- England -- Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471):355-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12607.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24132293" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Lasers ; Spectrum Analysis, Raman/*instrumentation/*methods ; Time Factors ; Vibration
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-12-12
    Description: The control of the electric and optical properties of semiconductors with microwave fields forms the basis of modern electronics, information processing and optical communications. The extension of such control to optical frequencies calls for wideband materials such as dielectrics, which require strong electric fields to alter their physical properties. Few-cycle laser pulses permit damage-free exposure of dielectrics to electric fields of several volts per angstrom and significant modifications in their electronic system. Fields of such strength and temporal confinement can turn a dielectric from an insulating state to a conducting state within the optical period. However, to extend electric signal control and processing to light frequencies depends on the feasibility of reversing these effects approximately as fast as they can be induced. Here we study the underlying electron processes with sub-femtosecond solid-state spectroscopy, which reveals the feasibility of manipulating the electronic structure and electric polarizability of a dielectric reversibly with the electric field of light. We irradiate a dielectric (fused silica) with a waveform-controlled near-infrared few-cycle light field of several volts per angstrom and probe changes in extreme-ultraviolet absorptivity and near-infrared reflectivity on a timescale of approximately a hundred attoseconds to a few femtoseconds. The field-induced changes follow, in a highly nonlinear fashion, the turn-on and turn-off behaviour of the driving field, in agreement with the predictions of a quantum mechanical model. The ultrafast reversibility of the effects implies that the physical properties of a dielectric can be controlled with the electric field of light, offering the potential for petahertz-bandwidth signal manipulation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultze, Martin -- Bothschafter, Elisabeth M -- Sommer, Annkatrin -- Holzner, Simon -- Schweinberger, Wolfgang -- Fiess, Markus -- Hofstetter, Michael -- Kienberger, Reinhard -- Apalkov, Vadym -- Yakovlev, Vladislav S -- Stockman, Mark I -- Krausz, Ferenc -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 3;493(7430):75-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11720. Epub 2012 Dec 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany. martin.schultze@mpq.mpg.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23222519" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-12-12
    Description: The time it takes to switch on and off electric current determines the rate at which signals can be processed and sampled in modern information technology. Field-effect transistors are able to control currents at frequencies of the order of or higher than 100 gigahertz, but electric interconnects may hamper progress towards reaching the terahertz (10(12) hertz) range. All-optical injection of currents through interfering photoexcitation pathways or photoconductive switching of terahertz transients has made it possible to control electric current on a subpicosecond timescale in semiconductors. Insulators have been deemed unsuitable for both methods, because of the need for either ultraviolet light or strong fields, which induce slow damage or ultrafast breakdown, respectively. Here we report the feasibility of electric signal manipulation in a dielectric. A few-cycle optical waveform reversibly increases--free from breakdown--the a.c. conductivity of amorphous silicon dioxide (fused silica) by more than 18 orders of magnitude within 1 femtosecond, allowing electric currents to be driven, directed and switched by the instantaneous light field. Our work opens the way to extending electronic signal processing and high-speed metrology into the petahertz (10(15) hertz) domain.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schiffrin, Agustin -- Paasch-Colberg, Tim -- Karpowicz, Nicholas -- Apalkov, Vadym -- Gerster, Daniel -- Muhlbrandt, Sascha -- Korbman, Michael -- Reichert, Joachim -- Schultze, Martin -- Holzner, Simon -- Barth, Johannes V -- Kienberger, Reinhard -- Ernstorfer, Ralph -- Yakovlev, Vladislav S -- Stockman, Mark I -- Krausz, Ferenc -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 3;493(7430):70-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11567. Epub 2012 Dec 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany. aschiffr@phas.ubc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23222521" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-03-22
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schiffrin, Agustin -- Paasch-Colberg, Tim -- Karpowicz, Nicholas -- Apalkov, Vadym -- Gerster, Daniel -- Muhlbrandt, Sascha -- Korbman, Michael -- Reichert, Joachim -- Schultze, Martin -- Holzner, Simon -- Barth, Johannes V -- Kienberger, Reinhard -- Ernstorfer, Ralph -- Yakovlev, Vladislav S -- Stockman, Mark I -- Krausz, Ferenc -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 20;507(7492):386-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13077.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24647001" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...