Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Publisher
Years
  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-0832
    Keywords: Aspergillus flavus ; aflatoxin ; cytochemistry ; Gossypium ; ultrastructure
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Cottonseeds having fluorescent fibers were harvested from fields in Arizona and examined utilizing light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The occurrence of fluorescent fibers indicated that seeds had been infected by Aspergillus flavus during development. Presence of A. flavus was verified by plating portions of seeds with fluorescent fibers. Hyphae, conidial heads, and conidia were identified readily in differentially-stained cotyledon tissue processed for light microscopy. Utilization of transmission electron microscopy permitted observations on lignified seed coats and cotyledons of mature cottonseeds. Hyphae were located throughout the cotyledon and in the nonlignified layers of the seed coat. The identification of hyphae in cross sections of vessel elements within the seed coat provided ultrastructural evidence supporting the hypothesis that A. flavus may enter seeds via the vascular tissue. Controls for the microscopy studies included observations on cottonseeds with no visual signs of infection and on laboratory-grown cultures of A. flavus. These observations demonstrated that the hyphae localized within fluorescent seeds had features characteristic of A. flavus and that fungal-like structures do not occur within uninfected seeds.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-0832
    Keywords: Aspergillus flavus ; aflatoxin ; Gossypium
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Twenty-seven mature cotton bolls with Aspergillus flavus Link colonies naturally occurring on the surface of the boll or lint were collected in the field in Arizona along with their subtending stems and peduncles. Bolls inoculated through the carpel wall 30 days after anthesis were allowed to mature in the field and were collected in the same manner. The seed and stem and peduncle sections of each boll were surface-sterilized, plated on agar media and observed for A. flavus. Seventy-eight percent of the naturally contaminated bolls with A. flavus in the seed also had the fungus in the stem and peduncle, whereas only 31% of the naturally contaminated bolls with no A. flavus in the seed had the fungus in the stem or peduncle. This difference was significant (P=0.0125), indicating a positive relationship between seed infection and stem and peduncle infection. All of the bolls inoculated through the carpel wall had A. flavus in the seed, but only 11% of the stem and peduncle sections were infected, indicating that the fungus does not readily grow downward from the boll into the supporting stem or peduncle. This unidirectional pattern of movement (upward) was further substantiated in greenhouse experiments where cotton seedlings were inoculated at the cotyledonary leaf scar with A. flavus and plants were sequentially harvested, surface sterilized and plated. Aspergillus flavus was isolated from the cotyledonary leaf scar, flower buds, developing bolls, and stem sections in the upper portion of the plant. It was never isolated from roots or stem sections below the cotyledonary node, again indicating that the fungus does not readily move downward through the plant.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...