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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; human ; COMMON ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; PROTEINS ; TIME ; DNA ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ANTIGEN ; SKIN ; papillomavirus ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; antibodies ; antibody ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; RISK FACTOR ; human papillomavirus ; VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES ; HPV ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; POPULATIONS ; case-control studies ; squamous cell carcinoma ; L1 ; PREVALENCE ; glutathione-S-transferase ; SERUM ; CELL CARCINOMA ; case control study ; case-control study ; RECIPIENTS ; HPV 16 ; TECHNOLOGY ; ACTINIC KERATOSES ; NONMELANOMA SKIN-CANCER ; HISTOLOGY ; USA ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; IMMUNOCOMPETENT INDIVIDUALS ; serology ; SEROPREVALENCE ; cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) ; HPV types ; human papillomavirus (HPV) ; Genital warts ; CONFIDENCE ; organ transplant recipients ; SCC
    Abstract: A case-control study was conducted in 140 people with histology proven cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 454 controls, nested within 2 cohorts of organ transplant recipients (OTR) recruited in London and Oxford between 2002 and 2006. All participants had a skin examination, completed a questionnaire and had serum tested for antibodies against the L1 antigen of 34 HPV types using Luminex technology. SCC was more common in men than women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-2.8, p = 0.02) and in people with susceptibility to burn easily (OR = 3.0, 95%CI: 1.9-4.8; p 〈 0.001). The risk increased with increasing age (p-trend 〈 0.001), increasing time since transplant (p-trend 〈 0.001), increasing self-reported number of sunburns as a child (p(trend) 〈 0.001) and with the presence of viral warts (p 〈 0.001). As expected, antibodies against HPV 16 were associated with a self-reported history of an abnormal cervical smear among women (OR 5.1, 95%CI: 2.6-10.2) and antibodies against HPV 6 were associated with a self-reported history of genital warts (OR 4.0, 95%CI: 2.2-7.2). However, no clear associations between any of the HPV types examined (including cutaneous betaHPVs) and SCC were identified. For example, the seroprevalence of HPV 5 was 15% among cases and 9% among controls (p = 0.09) and the seroprevalence of HPV 8 was 23% among cases and 21% among controls (p = 0.6). Nor was seropositivity to multiple types associated with SCC. These serological data do not provide evidence for a role for HPV in the aetiology of cutaneous SCC among OTR in two UK-based populations. (C) 2009 UICC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19588489
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  • 2
    Abstract: ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite intensive study of high-risk mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV), little is known of the epidemiology of cutaneous HPV. As part of a study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and HPV among organ transplant recipients (OTR) from London and Oxford, we investigated the seroprevalence and risk factors for 34 HPV types (detected using Luminex technology) among 425 Caucasian OTR without skin cancer. RESULTS: Overall, 86% of participants were seropositive to at least one HPV: 41% to mucosal alpha types, 33% to cutaneous alpha types, 57% to alpha types, 56% to beta, 47% to gamma types and 45% to other types (nu, mu, HPV101 and 103). In both centres, the most common types were HPV6 (33% and 26% for London and Oxford respectively), HPV8 (24% and 18%), HPV15 (26% and 29%), HPV17 (25% and 21%), HPV38 (23% and 21%), HPV49 (19% and 21%), HPV4 (27% and 23%), HPV65 (30% and 25%), HPV95 (22% and 20%), HPV1 (33% and 24%) and HPV63 (28% and 17%). The seroprevalence of 8 HPV types differed significantly (P 〈 0.05) between London and Oxford. Those individuals seropositive to multiple types of one genus were more likely to be seroreactive to multiple types of another genus. As expected, antibodies against mucosal alphaHPV types were more frequent in younger patients and among women. Sunbed use and sunbathing was associated with seropositivity to multiple gammaHPV (P-trend = 0.007) and self-history of abnormal smear was related to seroactivity to multiple betaHPV (P = 0.01). Skin type and other self reported markers of exposure to ultraviolet radiation were not consistently associated with any HPV types. No other distinguishing epidemiological features of transplant recipients with antibodies against single or multiple HPV types were identified. CONCLUSION: Findings for mucosal HPV types were in line with results from previous studies. We observed differences in HPV seroprevalence between organ transplant recipients from two geographically close centres but no clear risk factor was found associated with cutaneous HPV seropositivity among organ transplant recipients. These findings have implications for interpretation of future seroepidemiology studies addressing the association between HPV and cutaneous SCC in OTR populations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19751499
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; SKIN ; ASSOCIATION ; antibody ; MALIGNANCIES ; AGE ; risk factors ; skin cancer ; RISK FACTOR ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS DNA ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; PREVALENCE ; human papilloma virus ; SUNLIGHT ; glutathione-S-transferase ; HPV INFECTION ; IMMUNOCOMPETENT INDIVIDUALS ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTORS ; KERATOSES ; renal transplant recipients ; seborrhoeic warts
    Abstract: Background Renal transplant recipients (RTR) have a well recognized increased risk of cutaneous malignancy. A clinical observation that RTR with skin cancer often had multiple seborrhoeic warts prompted an investigation in RTR into the relationship between seborrhoeic warts and skin cancer and an exploration into potential risk factors for seborrhoeic warts in this population, including infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods This was a case control study involving 308 RTR. Clinical examinations identified seborrhoeic warts. Histological records reviewed to look for evidence of prior cutaneous malignancy. Seroprevalence of antibodies to 34 different HPV types tested using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (OR) calculated using unconditional logistic regression analysis to look for associations between skin cancer, HPV infection and seborrhoeic warts, controlling for potential confounding factors of gender, age and time since transplantation. Results Seborrhoeic warts were associated with non-melanoma skin cancer [OR = 3.7; 95% confidence intervals (CI) ranging from 1.6-8.9; P = 0.002] when confounding factors of gender, age and time since transplantation were controlled for. There was also an association between seborrhoeic warts and viral warts (OR = 3.0, CI: 1.6-5.4; P 〈 0.0001), but no association between seborrhoeic warts and infection with single or multiple HPV types. Conclusions Seborrhoeic warts are associated with cutaneous malignancy, but not with any of the HPV types tested. The reasons for this association are unclear. RTR with multiple seborrhoeic warts may require more regular cutaneous examination to monitor for early signs of skin cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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