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  • 1
    Keywords: POOR-PROGNOSIS ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA ; RISK STRATIFICATION ; outcome prediction ; TP53 MUTATIONS ; PATHWAY ACTIVATION ; MOLECULAR SUBGROUPS ; NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR TRKC ; MYCN AMPLIFICATION
    Abstract: Purpose Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Patients and Methods Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Results Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Conclusion Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-07-27
    Description: Medulloblastoma is an aggressively growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and shows tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently identified. WNT tumours, showing activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis. Group 3 and 4 tumours are molecularly less well characterized, and also present the greatest clinical challenges. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs, conducted as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) PedBrain Tumor Project. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 and 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of what are, to our knowledge, the first medulloblastoma fusion genes identified. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 and 4 patients.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662966/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jones, David T W -- Jager, Natalie -- Kool, Marcel -- Zichner, Thomas -- Hutter, Barbara -- Sultan, Marc -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Hovestadt, Volker -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Rausch, Tobias -- Warnatz, Hans-Jorg -- Ryzhova, Marina -- Bender, Sebastian -- Sturm, Dominik -- Pleier, Sabrina -- Cin, Huriye -- Pfaff, Elke -- Sieber, Laura -- Wittmann, Andrea -- Remke, Marc -- Witt, Hendrik -- Hutter, Sonja -- Tzaridis, Theophilos -- Weischenfeldt, Joachim -- Raeder, Benjamin -- Avci, Meryem -- Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav -- Zapatka, Marc -- Weber, Ursula D -- Wang, Qi -- Lasitschka, Barbel -- Bartholomae, Cynthia C -- Schmidt, Manfred -- von Kalle, Christof -- Ast, Volker -- Lawerenz, Chris -- Eils, Jurgen -- Kabbe, Rolf -- Benes, Vladimir -- van Sluis, Peter -- Koster, Jan -- Volckmann, Richard -- Shih, David -- Betts, Matthew J -- Russell, Robert B -- Coco, Simona -- Tonini, Gian Paolo -- Schuller, Ulrich -- Hans, Volkmar -- Graf, Norbert -- Kim, Yoo-Jin -- Monoranu, Camelia -- Roggendorf, Wolfgang -- Unterberg, Andreas -- Herold-Mende, Christel -- Milde, Till -- Kulozik, Andreas E -- von Deimling, Andreas -- Witt, Olaf -- Maass, Eberhard -- Rossler, Jochen -- Ebinger, Martin -- Schuhmann, Martin U -- Fruhwald, Michael C -- Hasselblatt, Martin -- Jabado, Nada -- Rutkowski, Stefan -- von Bueren, Andre O -- Williamson, Dan -- Clifford, Steven C -- McCabe, Martin G -- Collins, V Peter -- Wolf, Stephan -- Wiemann, Stefan -- Lehrach, Hans -- Brors, Benedikt -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Felsberg, Jorg -- Reifenberger, Guido -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Yaspo, Marie-Laure -- Korbel, Jan O -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Eils, Roland -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Lichter, Peter -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):100-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11284.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22832583" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/genetics ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Child ; Chromatin/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA Helicases/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Histone Demethylases/genetics ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/classification/diagnosis/*genetics/pathology ; Methylation ; Mutation/genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/genetics ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/genetics ; Polyploidy ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Signal Transduction ; T-Box Domain Proteins/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; beta Catenin/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-07-24
    Description: Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumours in children. Identifying and understanding the genetic events that drive these tumours is critical for the development of more effective diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Recently, our group and others described distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma on the basis of transcriptional and copy number profiles. Here we use whole-exome hybrid capture and deep sequencing to identify somatic mutations across the coding regions of 92 primary medulloblastoma/normal pairs. Overall, medulloblastomas have low mutation rates consistent with other paediatric tumours, with a median of 0.35 non-silent mutations per megabase. We identified twelve genes mutated at statistically significant frequencies, including previously known mutated genes in medulloblastoma such as CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4 and TP53. Recurrent somatic mutations were newly identified in an RNA helicase gene, DDX3X, often concurrent with CTNNB1 mutations, and in the nuclear co-repressor (N-CoR) complex genes GPS2, BCOR and LDB1. We show that mutant DDX3X potentiates transactivation of a TCF promoter and enhances cell viability in combination with mutant, but not wild-type, beta-catenin. Together, our study reveals the alteration of WNT, hedgehog, histone methyltransferase and now N-CoR pathways across medulloblastomas and within specific subtypes of this disease, and nominates the RNA helicase DDX3X as a component of pathogenic beta-catenin signalling in medulloblastoma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413789/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413789/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pugh, Trevor J -- Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan -- Archer, Tenley C -- Pomeranz Krummel, Daniel A -- Auclair, Daniel -- Bochicchio, James -- Carneiro, Mauricio O -- Carter, Scott L -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Erlich, Rachel L -- Greulich, Heidi -- Lawrence, Michael S -- Lennon, Niall J -- McKenna, Aaron -- Meldrim, James -- Ramos, Alex H -- Ross, Michael G -- Russ, Carsten -- Shefler, Erica -- Sivachenko, Andrey -- Sogoloff, Brian -- Stojanov, Petar -- Tamayo, Pablo -- Mesirov, Jill P -- Amani, Vladimir -- Teider, Natalia -- Sengupta, Soma -- Francois, Jessica Pierre -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Yu, Furong -- Crabtree, Gerald R -- Kautzman, Amanda G -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Getz, Gad -- Jager, Natalie -- Jones, David T W -- Lichter, Peter -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Roberts, Thomas M -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- CA050661/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- L40 NS063706/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD18655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA030002/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA105607/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA154480/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01CA105607/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R25 NS070682/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R25NS070682/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):106-10. doi: 10.1038/nature11329.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22820256" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cerebellar Neoplasms/classification/*genetics ; Child ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Helicases/chemistry/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Exome/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics ; LIM Domain Proteins/genetics ; Medulloblastoma/classification/*genetics ; Models, Molecular ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/genetics ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics ; Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics ; Repressor Proteins/genetics ; Signal Transduction ; TCF Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/chemistry/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; beta Catenin/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-12-21
    Description: Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4085046/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4085046/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Simakov, Oleg -- Marletaz, Ferdinand -- Cho, Sung-Jin -- Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric -- Havlak, Paul -- Hellsten, Uffe -- Kuo, Dian-Han -- Larsson, Tomas -- Lv, Jie -- Arendt, Detlev -- Savage, Robert -- Osoegawa, Kazutoyo -- de Jong, Pieter -- Grimwood, Jane -- Chapman, Jarrod A -- Shapiro, Harris -- Aerts, Andrea -- Otillar, Robert P -- Terry, Astrid Y -- Boore, Jeffrey L -- Grigoriev, Igor V -- Lindberg, David R -- Seaver, Elaine C -- Weisblat, David A -- Putnam, Nicholas H -- Rokhsar, Daniel S -- R01 GM 074619/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM074619/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 24;493(7433):526-31. doi: 10.1038/nature11696. Epub 2012 Dec 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23254933" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Body Patterning/*genetics ; Conserved Sequence/genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Genetic Linkage ; Genetic Speciation ; Genome/*genetics ; Humans ; INDEL Mutation/genetics ; Introns/genetics ; Leeches/anatomy & histology/*genetics ; Mollusca/anatomy & histology/*genetics ; Multigene Family/genetics ; *Phylogeny ; Polychaeta/anatomy & histology/*genetics ; Synteny/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-01-21
    Description: The genetics of renal cancer is dominated by inactivation of the VHL tumour suppressor gene in clear cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the commonest histological subtype. A recent large-scale screen of approximately 3,500 genes by PCR-based exon re-sequencing identified several new cancer genes in ccRCC including UTX (also known as KDM6A), JARID1C (also known as KDM5C) and SETD2 (ref. 2). These genes encode enzymes that demethylate (UTX, JARID1C) or methylate (SETD2) key lysine residues of histone H3. Modification of the methylation state of these lysine residues of histone H3 regulates chromatin structure and is implicated in transcriptional control. However, together these mutations are present in fewer than 15% of ccRCC, suggesting the existence of additional, currently unidentified cancer genes. Here, we have sequenced the protein coding exome in a series of primary ccRCC and report the identification of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene PBRM1 (ref. 4) as a second major ccRCC cancer gene, with truncating mutations in 41% (92/227) of cases. These data further elucidate the somatic genetic architecture of ccRCC and emphasize the marked contribution of aberrant chromatin biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Varela, Ignacio -- Tarpey, Patrick -- Raine, Keiran -- Huang, Dachuan -- Ong, Choon Kiat -- Stephens, Philip -- Davies, Helen -- Jones, David -- Lin, Meng-Lay -- Teague, Jon -- Bignell, Graham -- Butler, Adam -- Cho, Juok -- Dalgliesh, Gillian L -- Galappaththige, Danushka -- Greenman, Chris -- Hardy, Claire -- Jia, Mingming -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- Marshall, John -- McLaren, Stuart -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Stebbings, Lucy -- Largaespada, David A -- Wessels, L F A -- Richard, Stephane -- Kahnoski, Richard J -- Anema, John -- Tuveson, David A -- Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Mustonen, Ville -- Fischer, Andrej -- Adams, David J -- Rust, Alistair -- Chan-on, Waraporn -- Subimerb, Chutima -- Dykema, Karl -- Furge, Kyle -- Campbell, Peter J -- Teh, Bin Tean -- Stratton, Michael R -- Futreal, P Andrew -- 077012/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- R01 CA113636/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA134759/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jan 27;469(7331):539-42. doi: 10.1038/nature09639. Epub 2011 Jan 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248752" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Kidney Neoplasms/*genetics ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/*metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics ; Transcription Factors/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-02-22
    Description: Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, arises in the cerebellum and disseminates through the cerebrospinal fluid in the leptomeningeal space to coat the brain and spinal cord. Dissemination, a marker of poor prognosis, is found in up to 40% of children at diagnosis and in most children at the time of recurrence. Affected children therefore are treated with radiation to the entire developing brain and spinal cord, followed by high-dose chemotherapy, with the ensuing deleterious effects on the developing nervous system. The mechanisms of dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid are poorly studied, and medulloblastoma metastases have been assumed to be biologically similar to the primary tumour. Here we show that in both mouse and human medulloblastoma, the metastases from an individual are extremely similar to each other but are divergent from the matched primary tumour. Clonal genetic events in the metastases can be demonstrated in a restricted subclone of the primary tumour, suggesting that only rare cells within the primary tumour have the ability to metastasize. Failure to account for the bicompartmental nature of metastatic medulloblastoma could be a major barrier to the development of effective targeted therapies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3288636/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3288636/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Xiaochong -- Northcott, Paul A -- Dubuc, Adrian -- Dupuy, Adam J -- Shih, David J H -- Witt, Hendrik -- Croul, Sidney -- Bouffet, Eric -- Fults, Daniel W -- Eberhart, Charles G -- Garzia, Livia -- Van Meter, Timothy -- Zagzag, David -- Jabado, Nada -- Schwartzentruber, Jeremy -- Majewski, Jacek -- Scheetz, Todd E -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Li, Xiao-Nan -- Scherer, Stephen W -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Akagi, Keiko -- MacDonald, Tobey J -- Koster, Jan -- McCabe, Martin G -- Sarver, Aaron L -- Collins, V Peter -- Weiss, William A -- Largaespada, David A -- Collier, Lara S -- Taylor, Michael D -- K01CA122183/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- NS055089/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA108622/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA113636/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148699-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS055089/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 15;482(7386):529-33. doi: 10.1038/nature10825.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Center, Program in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343890" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Clonal Evolution/*genetics ; CpG Islands/genetics ; DNA Methylation ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Genes, p53/genetics ; Germ-Line Mutation/genetics ; Humans ; Li-Fraumeni Syndrome/complications/genetics ; Medulloblastoma/complications/*genetics/*pathology ; Mice ; Mutagenesis, Insertional ; Neoplasm Metastasis/*genetics/*pathology ; Survival Rate
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-05-24
    Description: Recent exon-sequencing studies of human tumours have revealed that subunits of BAF (mammalian SWI/SNF) complexes are mutated in more than 20% of all human malignancies, but the mechanisms involved in tumour suppression are unclear. BAF chromatin-remodelling complexes are polymorphic assemblies that use energy provided by ATP hydrolysis to regulate transcription through the control of chromatin structure and the placement of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) across the genome. Several proteins dedicated to this multisubunit complex, including BRG1 (also known as SMARCA4) and BAF250a (also known as ARID1A), are mutated at frequencies similar to those of recognized tumour suppressors. In particular, the core ATPase BRG1 is mutated in 5-10% of childhood medulloblastomas and more than 15% of Burkitt's lymphomas. Here we show a previously unknown function of BAF complexes in decatenating newly replicated sister chromatids, a requirement for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. We find that deletion of Brg1 in mouse cells, as well as the expression of BRG1 point mutants identified in human tumours, leads to anaphase bridge formation (in which sister chromatids are linked by catenated strands of DNA) and a G2/M-phase block characteristic of the decatenation checkpoint. Endogenous BAF complexes interact directly with endogenous topoisomerase IIalpha (TOP2A) through BAF250a and are required for the binding of TOP2A to approximately 12,000 sites across the genome. Our results demonstrate that TOP2A chromatin binding is dependent on the ATPase activity of BRG1, which is compromised in oncogenic BRG1 mutants. These studies indicate that the ability of TOP2A to prevent DNA entanglement at mitosis requires BAF complexes and suggest that this activity contributes to the role of BAF subunits as tumour suppressors.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3668793/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3668793/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dykhuizen, Emily C -- Hargreaves, Diana C -- Miller, Erik L -- Cui, Kairong -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Kool, Marcel -- Pfister, Stefan -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Zhao, Keji -- Crabtree, Gerald R -- R01 CA163915/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R03 DA032469/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R37 NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 30;497(7451):624-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12146. Epub 2013 May 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23698369" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Anaphase ; Animals ; Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Cycle Checkpoints ; Chromatids/metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly ; Chromosome Segregation ; DNA Helicases/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; DNA Replication ; DNA Topoisomerases, Type II/genetics/*metabolism ; DNA, Catenated/*chemistry/*metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Fibroblasts ; G2 Phase ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/genetics ; Mice ; Mitosis ; Nuclear Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription Factors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Ependymomas are common childhood brain tumours that occur throughout the nervous system, but are most common in the paediatric hindbrain. Current standard therapy comprises surgery and radiation, but not cytotoxic chemotherapy as it does not further increase survival. Whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing of 47 hindbrain ependymomas reveals an extremely low mutation rate, and zero significant recurrent somatic single nucleotide variants. Although devoid of recurrent single nucleotide variants and focal copy number aberrations, poor-prognosis hindbrain ependymomas exhibit a CpG island methylator phenotype. Transcriptional silencing driven by CpG methylation converges exclusively on targets of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 which represses expression of differentiation genes through trimethylation of H3K27. CpG island methylator phenotype-positive hindbrain ependymomas are responsive to clinical drugs that target either DNA or H3K27 methylation both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that epigenetic modifiers are the first rational therapeutic candidates for this deadly malignancy, which is epigenetically deregulated but genetically bland.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4174313/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4174313/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mack, S C -- Witt, H -- Piro, R M -- Gu, L -- Zuyderduyn, S -- Stutz, A M -- Wang, X -- Gallo, M -- Garzia, L -- Zayne, K -- Zhang, X -- Ramaswamy, V -- Jager, N -- Jones, D T W -- Sill, M -- Pugh, T J -- Ryzhova, M -- Wani, K M -- Shih, D J H -- Head, R -- Remke, M -- Bailey, S D -- Zichner, T -- Faria, C C -- Barszczyk, M -- Stark, S -- Seker-Cin, H -- Hutter, S -- Johann, P -- Bender, S -- Hovestadt, V -- Tzaridis, T -- Dubuc, A M -- Northcott, P A -- Peacock, J -- Bertrand, K C -- Agnihotri, S -- Cavalli, F M G -- Clarke, I -- Nethery-Brokx, K -- Creasy, C L -- Verma, S K -- Koster, J -- Wu, X -- Yao, Y -- Milde, T -- Sin-Chan, P -- Zuccaro, J -- Lau, L -- Pereira, S -- Castelo-Branco, P -- Hirst, M -- Marra, M A -- Roberts, S S -- Fults, D -- Massimi, L -- Cho, Y J -- Van Meter, T -- Grajkowska, W -- Lach, B -- Kulozik, A E -- von Deimling, A -- Witt, O -- Scherer, S W -- Fan, X -- Muraszko, K M -- Kool, M -- Pomeroy, S L -- Gupta, N -- Phillips, J -- Huang, A -- Tabori, U -- Hawkins, C -- Malkin, D -- Kongkham, P N -- Weiss, W A -- Jabado, N -- Rutka, J T -- Bouffet, E -- Korbel, J O -- Lupien, M -- Aldape, K D -- Bader, G D -- Eils, R -- Lichter, P -- Dirks, P B -- Pfister, S M -- Korshunov, A -- Taylor, M D -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA097257/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121941/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148621/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA163737/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA148699/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA159859/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):445-50. doi: 10.1038/nature13108. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [3] Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [4]. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [3] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [4]. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Molecular Genetics, Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, The Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 1X8, Canada. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Genome Biology, European Molecular Biology, Laboratory Meyerhofstr. 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany. ; 1] Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada. ; Department of Genetics, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Division of Bioinformatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital Boston, MIT, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada. ; Cancer Epigenetics Discovery Performance Unit, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA. ; Department of Oncogenomics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1105, The Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [3] CCU Pediatric Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] Centre for High-Throughput Biology, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, V6T 1Z4 British Columbia, Canada [2] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada [2] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3N1, Canada. ; Department of Pediatrics and National Capital Consortium, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132, USA. ; Pediatric Neurosurgery, Catholic University Medical School, Gemelli Hospital, Rome 00168, Italy. ; Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0646, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of Warsaw, Children's Memorial Health Institute University of Warsaw, Warsaw 04-730, Poland. ; Division of Anatomical Pathology, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. ; 1] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] Department of Neuropathology Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] University of Michigan Cell and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2200, USA [2] Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-0112, USA. ; Departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Neurosurgery, University of California, San Francisco, The Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; 1] Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Department of Neuro-oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; Department of Haematology and Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; 1] Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [3] Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Departments of Pediatrics and Human Genetics, McGill University and the McGill University Health Center Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec H3Z 2Z3, Canada. ; Department of Neuro-oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; Genome Biology, European Molecular Biology, Laboratory Meyerhofstr. 1, Heidelberg 69117, Germany. ; 1] Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [3] Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. ; 1] Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada [2] Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [3] Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [4] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69120, Germany [3] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ; 1] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg 69120, Germany [2] University of Michigan Cell and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2200, USA [3] CCU Neuropathology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553142" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics ; CpG Islands/*genetics ; DNA Methylation/drug effects ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Ependymoma/drug therapy/*genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; Epigenomics ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Silencing/drug effects ; Histones/drug effects/metabolism ; Humans ; Infant ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred NOD ; Mice, SCID ; Mutation/genetics ; Phenotype ; Polycomb Repressive Complex 2/metabolism ; Prognosis ; Rhombencephalon/pathology ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-10-28
    Description: Oxygen-containing mononuclear iron species--iron(III)-peroxo, iron(III)-hydroperoxo and iron(IV)-oxo--are key intermediates in the catalytic activation of dioxygen by iron-containing metalloenzymes. It has been difficult to generate synthetic analogues of these three active iron-oxygen species in identical host complexes, which is necessary to elucidate changes to the structure of the iron centre during catalysis and the factors that control their chemical reactivities with substrates. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of a mononuclear non-haem side-on iron(III)-peroxo complex, [Fe(III)(TMC)(OO)](+). We also report a series of chemical reactions in which this iron(III)-peroxo complex is cleanly converted to the iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex, [Fe(III)(TMC)(OOH)](2+), via a short-lived intermediate on protonation. This iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex then cleanly converts to the ferryl complex, [Fe(IV)(TMC)(O)](2+), via homolytic O-O bond cleavage of the iron(III)-hydroperoxo species. All three of these iron species--the three most biologically relevant iron-oxygen intermediates--have been spectroscopically characterized; we note that they have been obtained using a simple macrocyclic ligand. We have performed relative reactivity studies on these three iron species which reveal that the iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex is the most reactive of the three in the deformylation of aldehydes and that it has a similar reactivity to the iron(IV)-oxo complex in C-H bond activation of alkylaromatics. These reactivity results demonstrate that iron(III)-hydroperoxo species are viable oxidants in both nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions by iron-containing enzymes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306242/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3306242/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cho, Jaeheung -- Jeon, Sujin -- Wilson, Samuel A -- Liu, Lei V -- Kang, Eun A -- Braymer, Joseph J -- Lim, Mi Hee -- Hedman, Britt -- Hodgson, Keith O -- Valentine, Joan Selverstone -- Solomon, Edward I -- Nam, Wonwoo -- 5P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- GM 40392/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P41 RR001209-31/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM040392/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM040392-25/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- RR-001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 26;478(7370):502-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10535.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioinspired Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22031443" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aldehydes/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Enzymes/chemistry/metabolism ; Hydrogen Peroxide/*chemistry/metabolism ; Iron/*chemistry/metabolism ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Nonheme Iron Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Oxygen/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-03-01
    Description: The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes during the past 200-300 million years. The human MSY (male-specific region of Y chromosome) retains only three percent of the ancestral autosomes' genes owing to genetic decay. This evolutionary decay was driven by a series of five 'stratification' events. Each event suppressed X-Y crossing over within a chromosome segment or 'stratum', incorporated that segment into the MSY and subjected its genes to the erosive forces that attend the absence of crossing over. The last of these events occurred 30 million years ago, 5 million years before the human and Old World monkey lineages diverged. Although speculation abounds regarding ongoing decay and looming extinction of the human Y chromosome, remarkably little is known about how many MSY genes were lost in the human lineage in the 25 million years that have followed its separation from the Old World monkey lineage. To investigate this question, we sequenced the MSY of the rhesus macaque, an Old World monkey, and compared it to the human MSY. We discovered that during the last 25 million years MSY gene loss in the human lineage was limited to the youngest stratum (stratum 5), which comprises three percent of the human MSY. In the older strata, which collectively comprise the bulk of the human MSY, gene loss evidently ceased more than 25 million years ago. Likewise, the rhesus MSY has not lost any older genes (from strata 1-4) during the past 25 million years, despite its major structural differences to the human MSY. The rhesus MSY is simpler, with few amplified gene families or palindromes that might enable intrachromosomal recombination and repair. We present an empirical reconstruction of human MSY evolution in which each stratum transitioned from rapid, exponential loss of ancestral genes to strict conservation through purifying selection.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292678/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292678/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hughes, Jennifer F -- Skaletsky, Helen -- Brown, Laura G -- Pyntikova, Tatyana -- Graves, Tina -- Fulton, Robert S -- Dugan, Shannon -- Ding, Yan -- Buhay, Christian J -- Kremitzki, Colin -- Wang, Qiaoyan -- Shen, Hua -- Holder, Michael -- Villasana, Donna -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Cree, Andrew -- Courtney, Laura -- Veizer, Joelle -- Kotkiewicz, Holland -- Cho, Ting-Jan -- Koutseva, Natalia -- Rozen, Steve -- Muzny, Donna M -- Warren, Wesley C -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Wilson, Richard K -- Page, David C -- R01 HG000257/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG000257-17/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 22;483(7387):82-6. doi: 10.1038/nature10843.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. jhughes@wi.mit.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22367542" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chromosomes, Human, Y/*genetics ; Conserved Sequence/*genetics ; Crossing Over, Genetic/genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Amplification/genetics ; *Gene Deletion ; Humans ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Macaca mulatta/*genetics ; Male ; Models, Genetic ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Pan troglodytes/genetics ; Radiation Hybrid Mapping ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Time Factors ; Y Chromosome/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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