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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-09-06
    Description: PPARgamma is the functioning receptor for the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of antidiabetes drugs including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These drugs are full classical agonists for this nuclear receptor, but recent data have shown that many PPARgamma-based drugs have a separate biochemical activity, blocking the obesity-linked phosphorylation of PPARgamma by Cdk5. Here we describe novel synthetic compounds that have a unique mode of binding to PPARgamma, completely lack classical transcriptional agonism and block the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation in cultured adipocytes and in insulin-resistant mice. Moreover, one such compound, SR1664, has potent antidiabetic activity while not causing the fluid retention and weight gain that are serious side effects of many of the PPARgamma drugs. Unlike TZDs, SR1664 also does not interfere with bone formation in culture. These data illustrate that new classes of antidiabetes drugs can be developed by specifically targeting the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of PPARgamma.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179551/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Choi, Jang Hyun -- Banks, Alexander S -- Kamenecka, Theodore M -- Busby, Scott A -- Chalmers, Michael J -- Kumar, Naresh -- Kuruvilla, Dana S -- Shin, Youseung -- He, Yuanjun -- Bruning, John B -- Marciano, David P -- Cameron, Michael D -- Laznik, Dina -- Jurczak, Michael J -- Schurer, Stephan C -- Vidovic, Dusica -- Shulman, Gerald I -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- Griffin, Patrick R -- 1RC4DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK040936/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM084041-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01-GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-30/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405-31/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- RC4 DK090861-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U24 DK059635/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 MH074404-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54-MH074404/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Sep 4;477(7365):477-81. doi: 10.1038/nature10383.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology and Division of Metabolism and Chronic Disease, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21892191" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3-L1 Cells ; Adipocytes/drug effects/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, White/drug effects/metabolism ; Animals ; Biphenyl Compounds/chemistry/pharmacology ; Body Fluids/drug effects ; COS Cells ; Cercopithecus aethiops ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5/*antagonists & inhibitors ; Dietary Fats/pharmacology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects/chemistry/*pharmacology ; Ligands ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Obese ; Models, Molecular ; Obesity/chemically induced/metabolism ; Osteogenesis/drug effects ; PPAR gamma/agonists/chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation/drug effects ; Phosphoserine/metabolism ; Thiazolidinediones/adverse effects/pharmacology ; Transcription, Genetic/drug effects ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/pharmacology ; Weight Gain/drug effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-01-13
    Description: Exercise benefits a variety of organ systems in mammals, and some of the best-recognized effects of exercise on muscle are mediated by the transcriptional co-activator PPAR-gamma co-activator-1 alpha (PGC1-alpha). Here we show in mouse that PGC1-alpha expression in muscle stimulates an increase in expression of FNDC5, a membrane protein that is cleaved and secreted as a newly identified hormone, irisin. Irisin acts on white adipose cells in culture and in vivo to stimulate UCP1 expression and a broad program of brown-fat-like development. Irisin is induced with exercise in mice and humans, and mildly increased irisin levels in the blood cause an increase in energy expenditure in mice with no changes in movement or food intake. This results in improvements in obesity and glucose homeostasis. Irisin could be therapeutic for human metabolic disease and other disorders that are improved with exercise.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3522098/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3522098/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bostrom, Pontus -- Wu, Jun -- Jedrychowski, Mark P -- Korde, Anisha -- Ye, Li -- Lo, James C -- Rasbach, Kyle A -- Bostrom, Elisabeth Almer -- Choi, Jang Hyun -- Long, Jonathan Z -- Kajimura, Shingo -- Zingaretti, Maria Cristina -- Vind, Birgitte F -- Tu, Hua -- Cinti, Saverio -- Hojlund, Kurt -- Gygi, Steven P -- Spiegelman, Bruce M -- DK31405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK54477/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K99 DK087853/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK054477/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK061562/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK031405/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 11;481(7382):463-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10777.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22237023" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adipocytes/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, Brown/*cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Adipose Tissue, White/*cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Respiration/drug effects ; Cells, Cultured ; Culture Media, Conditioned/pharmacology ; Energy Metabolism/drug effects/genetics/physiology ; Exercise/physiology ; Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects/genetics ; Hormones/metabolism/secretion ; Humans ; Insulin Resistance/physiology ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Ion Channels/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Mice, Transgenic ; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism ; Models, Animal ; Muscle Cells/metabolism ; Obesity/blood/chemically induced/prevention & control ; Physical Conditioning, Animal/physiology ; Plasma/chemistry ; Subcutaneous Fat/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; *Thermogenesis/drug effects/genetics ; Trans-Activators/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism/secretion ; Transcription Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-02-05
    Description: We describe the draft genome of the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex, which is only 200 megabases and contains at least 30,907 genes. The high gene count is a consequence of an elevated rate of gene duplication resulting in tandem gene clusters. More than a third of Daphnia's genes have no detectable homologs in any other available proteome, and the most amplified gene families are specific to the Daphnia lineage. The coexpansion of gene families interacting within metabolic pathways suggests that the maintenance of duplicated genes is not random, and the analysis of gene expression under different environmental conditions reveals that numerous paralogs acquire divergent expression patterns soon after duplication. Daphnia-specific genes, including many additional loci within sequenced regions that are otherwise devoid of annotations, are the most responsive genes to ecological challenges.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3529199/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3529199/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Colbourne, John K -- Pfrender, Michael E -- Gilbert, Donald -- Thomas, W Kelley -- Tucker, Abraham -- Oakley, Todd H -- Tokishita, Shinichi -- Aerts, Andrea -- Arnold, Georg J -- Basu, Malay Kumar -- Bauer, Darren J -- Caceres, Carla E -- Carmel, Liran -- Casola, Claudio -- Choi, Jeong-Hyeon -- Detter, John C -- Dong, Qunfeng -- Dusheyko, Serge -- Eads, Brian D -- Frohlich, Thomas -- Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A -- Gerlach, Daniel -- Hatcher, Phil -- Jogdeo, Sanjuro -- Krijgsveld, Jeroen -- Kriventseva, Evgenia V -- Kultz, Dietmar -- Laforsch, Christian -- Lindquist, Erika -- Lopez, Jacqueline -- Manak, J Robert -- Muller, Jean -- Pangilinan, Jasmyn -- Patwardhan, Rupali P -- Pitluck, Samuel -- Pritham, Ellen J -- Rechtsteiner, Andreas -- Rho, Mina -- Rogozin, Igor B -- Sakarya, Onur -- Salamov, Asaf -- Schaack, Sarah -- Shapiro, Harris -- Shiga, Yasuhiro -- Skalitzky, Courtney -- Smith, Zachary -- Souvorov, Alexander -- Sung, Way -- Tang, Zuojian -- Tsuchiya, Dai -- Tu, Hank -- Vos, Harmjan -- Wang, Mei -- Wolf, Yuri I -- Yamagata, Hideo -- Yamada, Takuji -- Ye, Yuzhen -- Shaw, Joseph R -- Andrews, Justen -- Crease, Teresa J -- Tang, Haixu -- Lucas, Susan M -- Robertson, Hugh M -- Bork, Peer -- Koonin, Eugene V -- Zdobnov, Evgeny M -- Grigoriev, Igor V -- Lynch, Michael -- Boore, Jeffrey L -- P42 ES004699/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- P42 ES004699-25/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- P42ES004699/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES019324/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R24 GM078274/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R24 GM078274-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R24GM07827401/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Feb 4;331(6017):555-61. doi: 10.1126/science.1197761.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Indiana University, 915 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. jcolbour@indiana.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21292972" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Chromosome Mapping ; Daphnia/*genetics/physiology ; *Ecosystem ; Environment ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Conversion ; Gene Duplication ; Gene Expression ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genes ; Genes, Duplicate ; *Genome ; Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Multigene Family ; Phylogeny ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-12-20
    Description: Multivalent molecules with repetitive structures including bacterial capsular polysaccharides and viral capsids elicit antibody responses through B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking in the absence of T cell help. We report that immunization with these T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens causes up-regulation of endogenous retrovirus (ERV) RNAs in antigen-specific mouse B cells. These RNAs are detected via a mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-dependent RNA sensing pathway or reverse-transcribed and detected via the cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway, triggering a second, sustained wave of signaling that promotes specific immunoglobulin M production. Deficiency of both MAVS and cGAS, or treatment of MAVS-deficient mice with reverse transcriptase inhibitors, dramatically inhibits TI-2 antibody responses. These findings suggest that ERV and two innate sensing pathways that detect them are integral components of the TI-2 B cell signaling apparatus.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4391621/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4391621/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zeng, Ming -- Hu, Zeping -- Shi, Xiaolei -- Li, Xiaohong -- Zhan, Xiaoming -- Li, Xiao-Dong -- Wang, Jianhui -- Choi, Jin Huk -- Wang, Kuan-wen -- Purrington, Tiana -- Tang, Miao -- Fina, Maggy -- DeBerardinis, Ralph J -- Moresco, Eva Marie Y -- Pedersen, Gabriel -- McInerney, Gerald M -- Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B -- Chen, Zhijian J -- Beutler, Bruce -- P01 AI070167/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI093967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA157996/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI100627/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Dec 19;346(6216):1486-92. doi: 10.1126/science.346.6216.1486.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for the Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8502, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics and Children's Medical Center Research Institute, and McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8502, USA. ; Center for the Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8502, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA. ; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels vag 16, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. ; Center for the Genetics of Host Defense, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8502, USA. Bruce.Beutler@UTSouthwestern.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25525240" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics/*immunology ; Animals ; Antibody Formation ; Antigens, T-Independent/*immunology ; B-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Cytosol/immunology ; DNA/immunology ; Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics/*immunology ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Membrane Proteins/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; NF-kappa B/metabolism ; Nucleotides, Cyclic/immunology ; Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics/*immunology ; RNA, Viral/genetics/*immunology ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-09-08
    Description: Background/Aim: This study evaluated the prognostic value of the 8th edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) cancer staging system for patients with internal mammary lymph node (IMN) metastases. Materials and Methods: Of the patients with breast cancer who were treated between 2009 and 2013, 66 were diagnosed as cN3b. We restaged the patients and analyzed the prognostic value of the prognostically staged groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 53.9 months, the 5-year overall survival rates of patients with IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC stages were 100%, 95%, and 50% (p=0.001), while the progression-free survival rates were 100%, 83%, and 50% (p=0.005). Conclusion: Despite the small number of patients, the prognostic stage provided accurate information for IMN metastasized breast cancer, which will lead to more accurate prognosis predictions and optimal treatment selection.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-09
    Description: Objectives The predictors of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy (PICM) for complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) have not yet been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the major determinant of the occurrence of PICM. Setting This is a multicentre, retrospective analysis of CAVB from tertiary referral centres in Daejeon, South Korea. Participants A cohort of 900 consecutive patients with an implanted pacemaker was collected from December 2001 to August 2015. Of these, a total of 130 patients with CAVB with pacing-dependent rhythm who underwent ECG and echocardiogram before and after implantation were analysed for the occurrence of PICM. Outcome measures Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the determinant of PICM by ECG, device parameters and echocardiogram over a mean of 4.5 years. Results PICM was observed in 16.1% (n=21) of all patients with CAVB (age, 64±11 years; male, 36.2%). The preimplant left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (66%±9% vs 66%±8%) and non-apical pacing (40.4% vs 33.3%) were similar; however, the native QRS duration (124±34 ms vs 149±32 ms) and the paced QRS duration (pQRSd) (139±29 ms vs 167±28 ms) were significantly different between the two groups. The postimplant LV ejection fraction (61%±7% vs 31%±8%) was also significantly different at the end of follow-up. A pQRSd significantly correlated with PICM (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.09, P=0.001). A pQRSd with a cut-off value of above 140 ms had a sensitivity of 95% while a pQRSd with a cut-off value of above 167 ms had a specificity of 90% for PICM. Conclusion In patients with CAVB with pacing-dependent rhythm, regardless of the pacing site, the pQRSd is a major determinant of the occurrence of PICM.
    Keywords: Open access, Cardiovascular medicine
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-10-03
    Description: Memory stabilization after learning requires translational and transcriptional regulations in the brain, yet the temporal molecular changes that occur after learning have not been explored at the genomic scale. We used ribosome profiling and RNA sequencing to quantify the translational status and transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus after contextual fear conditioning. We revealed three types of repressive regulations: translational suppression of ribosomal protein-coding genes in the hippocampus, learning-induced early translational repression of specific genes, and late persistent suppression of a subset of genes via inhibition of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1/ERalpha) signaling. In behavioral analyses, overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the newly identified genes undergoing rapid translational repression, or activating ESR1 in the hippocampus impaired memory formation. Collectively, this study unveils the yet-unappreciated importance of gene repression mechanisms for memory formation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cho, Jun -- Yu, Nam-Kyung -- Choi, Jun-Hyeok -- Sim, Su-Eon -- Kang, SukJae Joshua -- Kwak, Chuljung -- Lee, Seung-Woo -- Kim, Ji-il -- Choi, Dong Il -- Kim, V Narry -- Kaang, Bong-Kiun -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 2;350(6256):82-7. doi: 10.1126/science.aac7368.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for RNA Research, Institute for Basic Science, Seoul 151-742, Korea. Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea. ; Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea. ; Center for RNA Research, Institute for Basic Science, Seoul 151-742, Korea. Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea. narrykim@snu.ac.kr kaang@snu.ac.kr. ; Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea. narrykim@snu.ac.kr kaang@snu.ac.kr.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430118" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Conditioning, Classical ; Estrogen Receptor alpha/*genetics ; Fear ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; Hippocampus/*metabolism ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/*genetics ; *Memory ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Protein Biosynthesis/*genetics ; Ribosomal Proteins/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-04-29
    Description: Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Choi, Ji-Hyuk -- Wang, Han -- Oh, Soong Ju -- Paik, Taejong -- Sung, Pil -- Sung, Jinwoo -- Ye, Xingchen -- Zhao, Tianshuo -- Diroll, Benjamin T -- Murray, Christopher B -- Kagan, Cherie R -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 8;352(6282):205-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aad0371.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Complex Assemblies of Soft Matter, CNRS-SOLVAY-PENN UMI 3254, Bristol, PA 19007-3624, USA. Rare Metals Research Center, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-350, Korea. ; Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, Korea. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Complex Assemblies of Soft Matter, CNRS-SOLVAY-PENN UMI 3254, Bristol, PA 19007-3624, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-747, Korea. ; Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. kagan@seas.upenn.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27124455" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-07-04
    Description: Background/Aim: Exosomes, derived from chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) cells, can be used as biomarkers and new targets for the detection of the BCR-ABL transcript. This study aimed to identify these possibilities. Materials and Methods: Human CML cell line-derived exosomes and CML-patients-derived exosomes were isolated with a size-exclusion chromatography column and ExoQuick™ exosome precipitation solution, respectively. Isolated exosomes were analysed by nested PCR to detect the BCR-ABL transcript. Results: Exosomes derived from the two human CML cell lines yielded a 250-bp band. RNA sequence analysis revealed 99% sequence homology with the partial mRNA for the human BCR-ABL chimeric protein. This ~250-bp band was also observed in the exosomes derived from patients with CML. However, only patients at the blast and accelerated phases showed the exosomal BCR-ABL transcript. Conclusion: CML-derived exosomes could act as novel targets for the detection of the BCR-ABL transcript.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0277-5387
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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