Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-09-05
    Description: Background: Telomere dysfunction triggers cellular senescence and constitutes a driving force for cancer initiation. Genetic variants in genes involved in telomere maintenance may contribute to colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods: In this study, we firstly captured germline mutations in 192 patients with colorectal cancer by sequencing the coding regions of 13 core components implicated in telomere biology. Five potential functional variants were then genotyped and assessed in a case–control set with 3,761 colorectal cancer cases and 3,839 healthy controls. The promising association was replicated in additional 6,765 cases and 6,906 controls. Functional experiments were used to further clarify the potential function of the significant variant and uncover the underlying mechanism in colorectal cancer development. Results: The two-stage association studies showed that a rare missense variant rs149418249 (c. C 1520 T and p.P507L) in the 11th exon of TPP1 (also known as ACD , gene ID 65057) was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk with the ORs being 2.90 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04–8.07; P = 0.041], 2.50 (95% CI, 1.04–6.04; P = 0.042), and 2.66 (95% CI, 1.36–5.18; P = 0.004) in discovery, replication, and the combined samples, respectively. Further functional annotation indicated that the TPP1 P507L substitution interrupted TPP1–TIN2 interaction, impaired telomerase processivity, and shortened telomere length, which subsequently facilitated cell proliferation and promoted colorectal cancer development. Conclusions: A rare variant P507L in TPP1 confers increased risk of colorectal cancer through interrupting TPP1–TIN2 interaction, impairing telomerase processivity, and shrinking telomere length. Impact: These findings emphasize the important role of telomere dysfunction in colorectal cancer development, and provide new insights about the prevention of this type of cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(9); 1029–35. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-07-16
    Description: Folate receptors (FRalpha, FRbeta and FRgamma) are cysteine-rich cell-surface glycoproteins that bind folate with high affinity to mediate cellular uptake of folate. Although expressed at very low levels in most tissues, folate receptors, especially FRalpha, are expressed at high levels in numerous cancers to meet the folate demand of rapidly dividing cells under low folate conditions. The folate dependency of many tumours has been therapeutically and diagnostically exploited by administration of anti-FRalpha antibodies, high-affinity antifolates, folate-based imaging agents and folate-conjugated drugs and toxins. To understand how folate binds its receptors, we determined the crystal structure of human FRalpha in complex with folic acid at 2.8 A resolution. FRalpha has a globular structure stabilized by eight disulphide bonds and contains a deep open folate-binding pocket comprised of residues that are conserved in all receptor subtypes. The folate pteroate moiety is buried inside the receptor, whereas its glutamate moiety is solvent-exposed and sticks out of the pocket entrance, allowing it to be conjugated to drugs without adversely affecting FRalpha binding. The extensive interactions between the receptor and ligand readily explain the high folate-binding affinity of folate receptors and provide a template for designing more specific drugs targeting the folate receptor system.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Chen -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Zhou, X Edward -- Yi, Wei -- Brunzelle, Joseph S -- Li, Jun -- Yong, Eu-Leong -- Xu, H Eric -- Melcher, Karsten -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Aug 22;500(7463):486-9. doi: 10.1038/nature12327. Epub 2013 Jul 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Program for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue North East, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23851396" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites/genetics ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Folate Receptor 1/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Folic Acid/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Mutation ; Protein Binding ; Structure-Activity Relationship
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-08-11
    Description: The plant hormone jasmonate plays crucial roles in regulating plant responses to herbivorous insects and microbial pathogens and is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Key mediators of jasmonate signalling include MYC transcription factors, which are repressed by jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressors in the resting state. In the presence of active jasmonate, JAZ proteins function as jasmonate co-receptors by forming a hormone-dependent complex with COI1, the F-box subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin E3 ligase. The hormone-dependent formation of the COI1-JAZ co-receptor complex leads to ubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation of JAZ repressors and release of MYC proteins from transcriptional repression. The mechanism by which JAZ proteins repress MYC transcription factors and how JAZ proteins switch between the repressor function in the absence of hormone and the co-receptor function in the presence of hormone remain enigmatic. Here we show that Arabidopsis MYC3 undergoes pronounced conformational changes when bound to the conserved Jas motif of the JAZ9 repressor. The Jas motif, previously shown to bind to hormone as a partly unwound helix, forms a complete alpha-helix that displaces the amino (N)-terminal helix of MYC3 and becomes an integral part of the MYC N-terminal fold. In this position, the Jas helix competitively inhibits MYC3 interaction with the MED25 subunit of the transcriptional Mediator complex. Our structural and functional studies elucidate a dynamic molecular switch mechanism that governs the repression and activation of a major plant hormone pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4567411/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4567411/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Feng -- Yao, Jian -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Zhang, Li -- Lam, Vinh Q -- Xin, Xiu-Fang -- Zhou, X Edward -- Chen, Jian -- Brunzelle, Joseph -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Zhou, Mingguo -- Xu, H Eric -- Melcher, Karsten -- He, Sheng Yang -- R01 AI068718/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01AI060761/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 10;525(7568):269-73. doi: 10.1038/nature14661. Epub 2015 Aug 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences and Laboratory of Structural Biology and Biochemistry, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; DOE Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA. ; College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, No. 1 Weigang, 210095, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008, USA. ; Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, Translational Research Institute, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang, China. ; Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Life Sciences Collaborative Access Team, Synchrotron Research Center, Northwestern University, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA. ; Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26258305" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Apoproteins/chemistry/metabolism ; *Arabidopsis/chemistry/metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Binding, Competitive/genetics ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cyclopentanes/*metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism ; Oxylipins/*metabolism ; Plant Growth Regulators/*metabolism ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein Binding/genetics ; Protein Conformation ; Repressor Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Trans-Activators/*antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Ubiquitination
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-01-28
    Description: Background/Aim: Combination of perioperative chemotherapy with gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy improves long-term survival in patients with gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative levels of CRP, albumin, fibrinogen, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and routinely used tumor markers (CEA, CA 19-9, CA 72-4) for lymph node involvement. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in 136 patients who underwent surgery between 2007 and 2015. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were performed in order to identify important characteristics associated with the risk of lymph node involvement. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank tests were used to compare overall survival. Results: Lymph node involvement was significantly affected by preoperative fibrinogen (p=0.008) and albumin (p=0.023). Poor clinical condition, T and N staging and fibrinogen level above 3.5 g/l were significantly associated with worse overall survival. Conclusion: Preoperative fibrinogen and albumin levels are significantly associated with lymphoid metastases in patients with gastric cancer.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 0378-4347
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Optics and Lasers in Engineering 9 (1988), S. 111-119 
    ISSN: 0143-8166
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics , Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1352-8661
    Keywords: EPR ; oximetry ; in vivo ; biocompatibility ; ischemia ; MRI
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine , Physics
    Notes: Abstract The development of oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic materials is being actively pursued because of their potential applications forin vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry. Among these materials, fusinite is of particular interest because of the high sensitivity of the EPR linewidth to the partial pressure pO2. Although this material has led to a number of very useful results in experimental systems, its potential use in humans is limited by the need to prove that it will not cause deleterious effects. The strategy used in this study to optimize the biocompatibility of the oxygen-sensitive materials was to prepare small silicon implants containing the fusinite. The use of silicon permits the diffusion of oxygen inside the implant while the material does not have contact with the biological environment. Radiosterilization did not affect the pO2 sensitivity of the material. The feasibility of performing pO2 measurement was verifiedin vivo by perodically inducing ischemia in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice over a period of 6 weeks.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [S.l.] : American Institute of Physics (AIP)
    Physics of Plasmas 8 (2001), S. 5006-5012 
    ISSN: 1089-7674
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: The role of energetic electrons in periodic self-oscillations of a discharge plasma has been studied by measuring the spatiotemporal evolution of plasma potential, electron density, and electron velocity distribution function. It is found that the self-oscillation involves the instabilities of sheaths, propagation of a double layer and competition between the ionization, thermalization, and diffusion. The energetic electrons are the key factor which links these processes to form the oscillation cycle. The time interval of each phase in the cycle is estimated according to the physical process and the calculations are in agreement with experimental measurements. The study of the probe perturbation effect on the oscillations indicates that the length of the oscillation period is related to the amount of energetic electrons; the more energetic electrons, the shorter the period. © 2001 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...