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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-08-31
    Description: Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate are regulated on geological timescales by the balance between carbon input from volcanic and metamorphic outgassing and its removal by weathering feedbacks; these feedbacks involve the erosion of silicate rocks and organic-carbon-bearing rocks. The integrated effect of these processes is reflected in the calcium carbonate compensation depth, which is the oceanic depth at which calcium carbonate is dissolved. Here we present a carbonate accumulation record that covers the past 53 million years from a depth transect in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The carbonate compensation depth tracks long-term ocean cooling, deepening from 3.0-3.5 kilometres during the early Cenozoic (approximately 55 million years ago) to 4.6 kilometres at present, consistent with an overall Cenozoic increase in weathering. We find large superimposed fluctuations in carbonate compensation depth during the middle and late Eocene. Using Earth system models, we identify changes in weathering and the mode of organic-carbon delivery as two key processes to explain these large-scale Eocene fluctuations of the carbonate compensation depth.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Palike, Heiko -- Lyle, Mitchell W -- Nishi, Hiroshi -- Raffi, Isabella -- Ridgwell, Andy -- Gamage, Kusali -- Klaus, Adam -- Acton, Gary -- Anderson, Louise -- Backman, Jan -- Baldauf, Jack -- Beltran, Catherine -- Bohaty, Steven M -- Bown, Paul -- Busch, William -- Channell, Jim E T -- Chun, Cecily O J -- Delaney, Margaret -- Dewangan, Pawan -- Dunkley Jones, Tom -- Edgar, Kirsty M -- Evans, Helen -- Fitch, Peter -- Foster, Gavin L -- Gussone, Nikolaus -- Hasegawa, Hitoshi -- Hathorne, Ed C -- Hayashi, Hiroki -- Herrle, Jens O -- Holbourn, Ann -- Hovan, Steve -- Hyeong, Kiseong -- Iijima, Koichi -- Ito, Takashi -- Kamikuri, Shin-ichi -- Kimoto, Katsunori -- Kuroda, Junichiro -- Leon-Rodriguez, Lizette -- Malinverno, Alberto -- Moore, Ted C Jr -- Murphy, Brandon H -- Murphy, Daniel P -- Nakamura, Hideto -- Ogane, Kaoru -- Ohneiser, Christian -- Richter, Carl -- Robinson, Rebecca -- Rohling, Eelco J -- Romero, Oscar -- Sawada, Ken -- Scher, Howie -- Schneider, Leah -- Sluijs, Appy -- Takata, Hiroyuki -- Tian, Jun -- Tsujimoto, Akira -- Wade, Bridget S -- Westerhold, Thomas -- Wilkens, Roy -- Williams, Trevor -- Wilson, Paul A -- Yamamoto, Yuhji -- Yamamoto, Shinya -- Yamazaki, Toshitsugu -- Zeebe, Richard E -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 30;488(7413):609-14. doi: 10.1038/nature11360.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK. hpaelike@marum.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22932385" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Altitude ; Atmosphere/chemistry ; Calcium Carbonate/*analysis ; *Carbon Cycle ; Carbon Dioxide/analysis ; Diatoms/metabolism ; Foraminifera/metabolism ; Geologic Sediments/chemistry ; Global Warming/history/statistics & numerical data ; History, 21st Century ; History, Ancient ; Marine Biology ; Oxygen/metabolism ; Pacific Ocean ; Seawater/*chemistry ; Temperature
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-06-14
    Description: Sediments cored along the southwestern Iberian margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 339 provide constraints on Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) circulation patterns from the Pliocene epoch to the present day. After the Strait of Gibraltar opened (5.33 million years ago), a limited volume of MOW entered the Atlantic. Depositional hiatuses indicate erosion by bottom currents related to higher volumes of MOW circulating into the North Atlantic, beginning in the late Pliocene. The hiatuses coincide with regional tectonic events and changes in global thermohaline circulation (THC). This suggests that MOW influenced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), THC, and climatic shifts by contributing a component of warm, saline water to northern latitudes while in turn being influenced by plate tectonics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hernandez-Molina, F Javier -- Stow, Dorrik A V -- Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A -- Acton, Gary -- Bahr, Andre -- Balestra, Barbara -- Ducassou, Emmanuelle -- Flood, Roger -- Flores, Jose-Abel -- Furota, Satoshi -- Grunert, Patrick -- Hodell, David -- Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco -- Kim, Jin Kyoung -- Krissek, Lawrence -- Kuroda, Junichiro -- Li, Baohua -- Llave, Estefania -- Lofi, Johanna -- Lourens, Lucas -- Miller, Madeline -- Nanayama, Futoshi -- Nishida, Naohisa -- Richter, Carl -- Roque, Cristina -- Pereira, Helder -- Sanchez Goni, Maria Fernanda -- Sierro, Francisco J -- Singh, Arun Deo -- Sloss, Craig -- Takashimizu, Yasuhiro -- Tzanova, Alexandrina -- Voelker, Antje -- Williams, Trevor -- Xuan, Chuang -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jun 13;344(6189):1244-50. doi: 10.1126/science.1251306.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK. javier.hernandez-molina@rhul.ac.uk. ; Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, Scotland, UK. ; International Ocean Discovery Program, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA. ; Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341, USA. ; Institute of Geosciences, University of Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany. ; Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac Cedex, France. ; School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. ; Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Salamanca, 3008 Salamanca, Spain. ; Department of Natural History Sciences, Hokkaido University, N10W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan. ; Institute for Earth Sciences, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria. ; Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK. ; Department of Biogeochemistry, JAMSTEC, 237-0061 Yokosuka, Japan. ; Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, Ansan 426-744, Korea. ; School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Institute for Frontier Research on Earth Evolution (IFREE), JAMSTEC, 2-15 Natsushima-Cho, Yokosuka-city, Kanagawa 237-0061, Japan. ; Department of Micropalaeontology, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, P.R. China. ; Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana, Rios Rosas 23, 28003 Madrid, Spain. ; Geosciences Montpellier, Universite Montpellier II, 34090 Montpellier, France, and Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK. ; Institute of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. ; Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, Geological Survey of Japan (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan. ; School of Geosciences, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA. ; Divisao de Geologia e Georecursos Marinhos, IPMA, 1749-077 Lisboa, Portugal. ; Grupo de Biologia e Geologia, Escola Secundaria de Loule, 8100-740 Loule, Portugal. ; Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac, France. ; Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India. ; School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia. ; Department of Geology, Faculty of Education, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan. ; Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. ; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA. ; Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926012" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Atlantic Ocean ; *Climate Change ; Mediterranean Sea ; Paleontology ; *Seawater ; *Water Movements
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0921-4534
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-8798
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary The susceptibility of fourteen established cell lines to infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was assayed using an indirect fluorescent antibody technique. In kinetic studies, the degree of binding and internalization of JEV allowed the identification of high susceptibility and low-susceptibility cells. Scatchard analysis showed that JEV specifically bound to high-susceptibility Vero cells with greater affinity than to low-susceptibility NRK cells. Microinjection of viral genomic RNA into NRK cells induced highly efficient production of viral antigen and infectious virions. A hemagglutinin-inhibiting monoclonal antibody against JEV (MAb 301) inhibited the binding of JEV to the Vero and NRK cells. JEV was found to bind to a 74K molecule present in the membrane fraction of Vero cells and this binding was inhibited by MAb 301. Importantly, the 74K molecule was not detected in the membrane faction of NRK cells. These results suggest that early events in the JEV-cell interaction influence the susceptibility of cells to infection, and in particular suggests that the 74K molecule may be a possible candidate or component of the cellular receptor for JEV.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-8798
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Among all the neural cells in fetal rat brain culture developing neurons showed the highest rate of infection by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). JEV specifically bound to these cells as measured by immuno-staining. These results indicate that developing neurons are the major target of JEV, and that the initial specific binding of virus to these cells may be one of the reasons for the neurotropism of JEV.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-8798
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary To study the role of HIV-1 gp120 in loss of myelin in HIV encephalopathy, the binding of gp120 to various types of neural cells and its effects on myelination were examined in rat primary brain culture. Doublestaining of cultured cells with gp120 and specific antibodies for different neural cell types showed that gp120 bound to most of the galactocerebroside (GalC)-positive oligodendrocytes, a small population of type-2-like astrocytes and a few small neurons. Gp120 did not bind to type-1-like astrocytes, most neurons, or to macrophage/microglia. To assay myelination, cells were bathed in a myelination medium containing chick embryo extract and high glucose, with or without gp120. Seven days after the application, myelination in the culture was observed morphologically and by staining with anti-myelin basic protein (MBP) antibody, and was found to be significantly inhibited by the addition of gp120 (50–100 nM). The processes of oligodendrocytes were reduced in length and arborization relative to the control, but MBP production by oligodendrocytes was unaffected. These results show that gp120 can cause a functional disorder of oligodendrocytes and thus could underlie the diffuse loss of mylein sheaths of HIV encephalopathy.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-0584
    Keywords: Aggressive-phase multiple myeloma ; Burkitt's type translocation ; Double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization ; c-myc
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-0584
    Keywords: Key words Aggressive natural killer cell ; Leukemia/lymphoma ; Spectral karyotyping ; Epstein-Barr virus
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  A 38-year-old male presented with fever and hepatosplenomegaly. Cells that had infiltrated to the bone marrow were consistent immunophenotypically and genotypically with natural killer (NK) cells. Oligoclonal Epstein-Barr virus infection was detected in the bone marrow cells. The patient was diagnosed as a case of aggressive NK cell leukemia/lymphoma. Combined chemotherapy was not effective and death occurred shortly after presentation. Although the karyotype of this case was too complicated to be accurately identified only by G-banding, spectral karyotyping (SKY) analysis not only identified all chromosomal materials of unknown origin, but also detected the cryptic translocation on the apparently normal chromosome. Moreover, SKY analysis identified der(4)t(4;14)(q12;q11.2). The chromosomal band 14q11.2 is a recurring breakpoint in T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and is also the locus of the δ chain of the T-cell receptor. To our knowledge, t(4;14)(q12;q11.2) in T-cell or NK-cell malignancies has not been previously reported.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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