Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
Filter
Language
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-10-23
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Abstract: Importance: Comprehensive and timely monitoring of disease burden in all age groups, including children and adolescents, is essential for improving population health. Objective: To quantify and describe levels and trends of mortality and nonfatal health outcomes among children and adolescents from 1990 to 2015 to provide a framework for policy discussion. Evidence Review: Cause-specific mortality and nonfatal health outcomes were analyzed for 195 countries and territories by age group, sex, and year from 1990 to 2015 using standardized approaches for data processing and statistical modeling, with subsequent analysis of the findings to describe levels and trends across geography and time among children and adolescents 19 years or younger. A composite indicator of income, education, and fertility was developed (Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) for each geographic unit and year, which evaluates the historical association between SDI and health loss. Findings: Global child and adolescent mortality decreased from 14.18 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 14.09 million to 14.28 million) deaths in 1990 to 7.26 million (95% UI, 7.14 million to 7.39 million) deaths in 2015, but progress has been unevenly distributed. Countries with a lower SDI had a larger proportion of mortality burden (75%) in 2015 than was the case in 1990 (61%). Most deaths in 2015 occurred in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Global trends were driven by reductions in mortality owing to infectious, nutritional, and neonatal disorders, which in the aggregate led to a relative increase in the importance of noncommunicable diseases and injuries in explaining global disease burden. The absolute burden of disability in children and adolescents increased 4.3% (95% UI, 3.1%-5.6%) from 1990 to 2015, with much of the increase owing to population growth and improved survival for children and adolescents to older ages. Other than infectious conditions, many top causes of disability are associated with long-term sequelae of conditions present at birth (eg, neonatal disorders, congenital birth defects, and hemoglobinopathies) and complications of a variety of infections and nutritional deficiencies. Anemia, developmental intellectual disability, hearing loss, epilepsy, and vision loss are important contributors to childhood disability that can arise from multiple causes. Maternal and reproductive health remains a key cause of disease burden in adolescent females, especially in lower-SDI countries. In low-SDI countries, mortality is the primary driver of health loss for children and adolescents, whereas disability predominates in higher-SDI locations; the specific pattern of epidemiological transition varies across diseases and injuries. Conclusions and Relevance: Consistent international attention and investment have led to sustained improvements in causes of health loss among children and adolescents in many countries, although progress has been uneven. The persistence of infectious diseases in some countries, coupled with ongoing epidemiologic transition to injuries and noncommunicable diseases, require all countries to carefully evaluate and implement appropriate strategies to maximize the health of their children and adolescents and for the international community to carefully consider which elements of child and adolescent health should be monitored.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28384795
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-11-12
    Description: In multicellular organisms, transcription regulation is one of the central mechanisms modelling lineage differentiation and cell-fate determination. Transcription requires dynamic chromatin configurations between promoters and their corresponding distal regulatory elements. It is believed that their communication occurs within large discrete foci of aggregated RNA polymerases termed transcription factories in three-dimensional nuclear space. However, the dynamic nature of chromatin connectivity has not been characterized at the genome-wide level. Here, through a chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tagging approach using an antibody that primarily recognizes the pre-initiation complexes of RNA polymerase II, we explore the transcriptional interactomes of three mouse cells of progressive lineage commitment, including pluripotent embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells and neurosphere stem/progenitor cells. Our global chromatin connectivity maps reveal approximately 40,000 long-range interactions, suggest precise enhancer-promoter associations and delineate cell-type-specific chromatin structures. Analysis of the complex regulatory repertoire shows that there are extensive colocalizations among promoters and distal-acting enhancers. Most of the enhancers associate with promoters located beyond their nearest active genes, indicating that the linear juxtaposition is not the only guiding principle driving enhancer target selection. Although promoter-enhancer interactions exhibit high cell-type specificity, promoters involved in interactions are found to be generally common and mostly active among different cells. Chromatin connectivity networks reveal that the pivotal genes of reprogramming functions are transcribed within physical proximity to each other in embryonic stem cells, linking chromatin architecture to coordinated gene expression. Our study sets the stage for the full-scale dissection of spatial and temporal genome structures and their roles in orchestrating development.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3954713/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3954713/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Yubo -- Wong, Chee-Hong -- Birnbaum, Ramon Y -- Li, Guoliang -- Favaro, Rebecca -- Ngan, Chew Yee -- Lim, Joanne -- Tai, Eunice -- Poh, Huay Mei -- Wong, Eleanor -- Mulawadi, Fabianus Hendriyan -- Sung, Wing-Kin -- Nicolis, Silvia -- Ahituv, Nadav -- Ruan, Yijun -- Wei, Chia-Lin -- 1U54HG004557-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- GGP12152/Telethon/Italy -- GM61390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK090382/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059862/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004456-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS079231/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01DK090382/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01HD059862/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HG003521-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG005058/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG006768/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS079231/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U01 GM061390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U19 GM061390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 12;504(7479):306-10. doi: 10.1038/nature12716. Epub 2013 Nov 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2] [3] Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel (R.Y.B.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Systems Biology Center, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA (Y.Z.). ; 1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Institute for Human Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94158, USA [2] [3] Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel (R.Y.B.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Systems Biology Center, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA (Y.Z.). ; 1] The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, and Department of Genetic and Development Biology, University of Connecticut, 400 Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA [2] Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore. ; Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano, Italy. ; Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA. ; Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore. ; Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Institute for Human Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, and Department of Genetic and Development Biology, University of Connecticut, 400 Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA. ; 1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2] Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24213634" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; Cell Lineage ; Chromatin/*genetics/*metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Mice ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/*genetics ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics ; Zebrafish/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-08-15
    Description: The vast majority of the mammalian genome has the potential to express noncoding RNA (ncRNA). The 11-subunit RNA exosome complex is the main source of cellular 3'-5' exoribonucleolytic activity and potentially regulates the mammalian noncoding transcriptome. Here we generated a mouse model in which the essential subunit Exosc3 of the RNA exosome complex can be conditionally deleted. Exosc3-deficient B cells lack the ability to undergo normal levels of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, two mutagenic DNA processes used to generate antibody diversity via the B-cell mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). The transcriptome of Exosc3-deficient B cells has revealed the presence of many novel RNA exosome substrate ncRNAs. RNA exosome substrate RNAs include xTSS-RNAs, transcription start site (TSS)-associated antisense transcripts that can exceed 500 base pairs in length and are transcribed divergently from cognate coding gene transcripts. xTSS-RNAs are most strongly expressed at genes that accumulate AID-mediated somatic mutations and/or are frequent translocation partners of DNA double-strand breaks generated at Igh in B cells. Strikingly, translocations near TSSs or within gene bodies occur over regions of RNA exosome substrate ncRNA expression. These RNA exosome-regulated, antisense-transcribed regions of the B-cell genome recruit AID and accumulate single-strand DNA structures containing RNA-DNA hybrids. We propose that RNA exosome regulation of ncRNA recruits AID to single-strand DNA-forming sites of antisense and divergent transcription in the B-cell genome, thereby creating a link between ncRNA transcription and overall maintenance of B-cell genomic integrity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4372240/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4372240/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pefanis, Evangelos -- Wang, Jiguang -- Rothschild, Gerson -- Lim, Junghyun -- Chao, Jaime -- Rabadan, Raul -- Economides, Aris N -- Basu, Uttiya -- 1DP2OD008651-01/OD/NIH HHS/ -- 1R01AI099195-01A1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 1R01CA179044-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 1R01CA185486-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 1U54CA121852-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD008651/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI099195/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA121852/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 16;514(7522):389-93. doi: 10.1038/nature13580. Epub 2014 Aug 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, New York 10591, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Department of Systems Biology and Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [2]. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Systems Biology and Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, New York 10591, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25119026" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; B-Lymphocytes/*metabolism ; Base Pairing ; Cytidine Deaminase/*metabolism ; DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded ; DNA, Single-Stranded/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Exosome Multienzyme Ribonuclease Complex/deficiency/genetics ; Exosomes/metabolism ; Female ; Genome/genetics ; Genomic Instability/genetics ; Immunoglobulin Class Switching/genetics ; Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics ; Male ; Mice ; Nucleic Acid Hybridization ; RNA, Antisense/biosynthesis/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Untranslated/*biosynthesis/chemistry/*genetics/metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin/genetics ; Substrate Specificity ; Transcription Initiation Site ; Transcription, Genetic/*genetics ; Translocation, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-01-12
    Description: Orally administered probiotics change gut microbiota composition and enzyme activities. Thus, coadministration of probiotics with drugs may lead to changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters of the drugs. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen in mice treated with probiotics. Oral administration of probiotics changed the gut microbiota composition in the mice. Of these probiotics, Lactobacillus reuteri K8 increased the numbers of clostridia, bifidobacteria, and enterococci, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus K9 decreased the number of bifidobacteria, determined by culturing in selective media. Next, we performed a pharmacokinetic study of acetaminophen in mice orally treated with K8 and K9 for 3 days. Treatment with K8 reduced the area under the curve (AUC) of orally administered acetaminophen to 68.4% compared with normal control mice, whereas K9 did not affect the AUC of acetaminophen. Oral administration to mice of K8, which degraded acetaminophen, increased the degradation of acetaminophen by gut microbiota, whereas K9 treatment did not affect it. Treatment with K8 increased the number of L. reuteri adhered in the upper small intestine, whereas the number of L. rhamnosus was not affected by treatment with K8 or K9. K8 increased the number of cyanobacteria, whereas K9 increased the number of deferribacteres. These results suggest that the intake of probiotics may make the absorption of orally administered drugs fluctuate through the disturbance of gut microbiota-mediated drug metabolism and that the subsequent impact on microbiota metabolism could result in altered systemic concentrations of the intact drug.
    Print ISSN: 0090-9556
    Electronic ISSN: 1521-009X
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-12-02
    Description: Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most dramatic examples of massive stellar deaths, often associated with supernovae. They release ultra-relativistic jets, which produce non-thermal emission through synchrotron radiation as they interact with the surrounding medium. Here we report observations of the unusual GRB 101225A. Its gamma-ray emission was exceptionally long-lived and was followed by a bright X-ray transient with a hot thermal component and an unusual optical counterpart. During the first 10 days, the optical emission evolved as an expanding, cooling black body, after which an additional component, consistent with a faint supernova, emerged. We estimate its redshift to be z = 0.33 by fitting the spectral-energy distribution and light curve of the optical emission with a GRB-supernova template. Deep optical observations may have revealed a faint, unresolved host galaxy. Our proposed progenitor is a merger of a helium star with a neutron star that underwent a common envelope phase, expelling its hydrogen envelope. The resulting explosion created a GRB-like jet which became thermalized by interacting with the dense, previously ejected material, thus creating the observed black body, until finally the emission from the supernova dominated. An alternative explanation is a minor body falling onto a neutron star in the Galaxy.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thone, C C -- de Ugarte Postigo, A -- Fryer, C L -- Page, K L -- Gorosabel, J -- Aloy, M A -- Perley, D A -- Kouveliotou, C -- Janka, H T -- Mimica, P -- Racusin, J L -- Krimm, H -- Cummings, J -- Oates, S R -- Holland, S T -- Siegel, M H -- De Pasquale, M -- Sonbas, E -- Im, M -- Park, W-K -- Kann, D A -- Guziy, S -- Garcia, L Hernandez -- Llorente, A -- Bundy, K -- Choi, C -- Jeong, H -- Korhonen, H -- Kubanek, P -- Lim, J -- Moskvitin, A -- Munoz-Darias, T -- Pak, S -- Parrish, I -- England -- Nature. 2011 Nov 30;480(7375):72-4. doi: 10.1038/nature10611.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉IAA - CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada, Spain. cthoene@iaa.es〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22129726" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-05-25
    Description: Objectives To validate the performances of two prediction models (Brock and Lee models) for the differentiation of minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and invasive pulmonary adenocarcinoma (IPA) from preinvasive lesions among subsolid nodules (SSNs). Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting A tertiary university hospital in South Korea. Participants 410 patients with 410 incidentally detected SSNs who underwent surgical resection for the pulmonary adenocarcinoma spectrum between 2011 and 2015. Primary and secondary outcome measures Using clinical and radiological variables, the predicted probability of MIA/IPA was calculated from pre-existing logistic models (Brock and Lee models). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were calculated and compared between models. Performance metrics including sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were also obtained. Results For pure ground-glass nodules (n=101), the AUC of the Brock model in differentiating MIA/IPA (59/101) from preinvasive lesions (42/101) was 0.671. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV based on the optimal cut-off value were 64.4%, 64.3%, 64.4%, 71.7% and 56.3%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV according to the Lee criteria were 76.3%, 42.9%, 62.4%, 65.2% and 56.3%, respectively. AUC was not obtained for the Lee model as a single cut-off of nodule size (≥10 mm) was suggested by this model for the assessment of pure ground-glass nodules. For part-solid nodules (n=309; 26 preinvasive lesions and 283 MIA/IPAs), the AUC was 0.746 for the Brock model and 0.771 for the Lee model (p=0.574). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV were 82.3%, 53.8%, 79.9%, 95.1% and 21.9%, respectively, for the Brock model and 77.0%, 69.2%, 76.4%, 96.5% and 21.7%, respectively, for the Lee model. Conclusions The performance of prediction models for the incidentally detected SSNs in differentiating MIA/IPA from preinvasive lesions might be suboptimal. Thus, an alternative risk calculation model is required for the incidentally detected SSNs.
    Keywords: Open access, Oncology
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-08-03
    Description: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by a loss of β-cells in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas and subsequent deficient insulin secretion in response to hyperglycemia. Development of an in vivo test to measure β-cell mass (BCM) would greatly enhance the ability to track diabetes therapies. β-cells and neurologic tissues have common cellular receptors and transporters, therefore, we screened brain radioligands for their ability to identify β-cells. Methods: We examined a β-cell gene atlas for endocrine pancreas receptor targets and cross-referenced these targets with brain radioligands that were available at our institution. Twelve healthy control subjects and 2 T1DM subjects underwent dynamic PET/CT scans with 6 tracers. Results: The D 2 /D 3 receptor agonist radioligand 11 C-(+)-4-propyl-9-hydroxynaphthoxazine (PHNO) was the only radioligand to demonstrate sustained uptake in the pancreas with high contrast versus abdominal organs such as the kidneys, liver, and spleen, based on the first 30 min of data. Mean SUV from 20 to 30 min demonstrated high uptake of 11 C-(+)-PHNO in healthy controls (SUV, 13.8) with a 71% reduction in a T1DM subject with undetectable levels of C-peptide (SUV, 4.0) and a 20% reduction in a T1DM subject with fasting C-peptide level of 0.38 ng/mL (SUV, 11.0). SUV in abdominal organs outside the pancreas did not show measurable differences between the control and T1DM subjects, suggesting that the changes in SUV of 11 C-(+)-PHNO may be specific to changes in the pancreas between healthy controls and T1DM subjects. When D 3 and D 2 antagonists were used in nonhuman primates, specific pancreatic binding (SUVR-1) of 11 C-PHNO was reduced by 57% and 38%, respectively. Conclusion: 11 C-(+)-PHNO is a potential marker of BCM, with 2:1 binding of D 3 receptors over D 2 receptors. Further in vitro and in vivo studies to establish D 2 /D 3 receptor specificity to β-cells is warranted to characterize 11 C-(+)-PHNO as a candidate for clinical measurement of BCM in healthy control and diabetic subjects.
    Print ISSN: 0022-3123
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis involve the progressive and inexorable destruction of oxygen exchange surfaces and airways, and have emerged as a leading cause of death worldwide. Mitigating therapies, aside from impractical organ transplantation, remain limited and the possibility of regenerative medicine has lacked empirical support. However, it is clinically known that patients who survive sudden, massive loss of lung tissue from necrotizing pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome often recover full pulmonary function within six months. Correspondingly, we recently demonstrated lung regeneration in mice following H1N1 influenza virus infection, and linked distal airway stem cells expressing Trp63 (p63) and keratin 5, called DASC(p63/Krt5), to this process. Here we show that pre-existing, intrinsically committed DASC(p63/Krt5) undergo a proliferative expansion in response to influenza-induced lung damage, and assemble into nascent alveoli at sites of interstitial lung inflammation. We also show that the selective ablation of DASC(p63/Krt5) in vivo prevents this regeneration, leading to pre-fibrotic lesions and deficient oxygen exchange. Finally, we demonstrate that single DASC(p63/Krt5)-derived pedigrees differentiate to type I and type II pneumocytes as well as bronchiolar secretory cells following transplantation to infected lung and also minimize the structural consequences of endogenous stem cell loss on this process. The ability to propagate these cells in culture while maintaining their intrinsic lineage commitment suggests their potential in stem cell-based therapies for acute and chronic lung diseases.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zuo, Wei -- Zhang, Ting -- Wu, Daniel Zheng'An -- Guan, Shou Ping -- Liew, Audrey-Ann -- Yamamoto, Yusuke -- Wang, Xia -- Lim, Siew Joo -- Vincent, Matthew -- Lessard, Mark -- Crum, Christopher P -- Xian, Wa -- McKeon, Frank -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jan 29;517(7536):616-20. doi: 10.1038/nature13903. Epub 2014 Nov 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Genome Institute of Singapore, A-STAR, 138672 Singapore. ; The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, USA. ; Advanced Cell Technologies, Marlborough, Massachusetts 01752, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Genome Institute of Singapore, A-STAR, 138672 Singapore [2] The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, USA [3] Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [4] Department of Medicine, National University Health System, 119228 Singapore [5] Department of Genetics and Developmental Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA. ; 1] Genome Institute of Singapore, A-STAR, 138672 Singapore [2] The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, USA [3] Department of Medicine, National University Health System, 119228 Singapore.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25383540" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bronchioles/cytology/virology ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Lineage ; Cell Proliferation ; Dogs ; Humans ; Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/pathogenicity ; Keratin-5/*metabolism ; Lung/*cytology/pathology/*physiology/virology ; Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells ; Mice ; Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism/pathology/virology ; Oxygen/metabolism ; Pedigree ; Phosphoproteins/*metabolism ; Pneumonia/metabolism/pathology/virology ; Pulmonary Alveoli/cytology/pathology/virology ; Re-Epithelialization ; *Regeneration ; Stem Cell Transplantation ; Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Trans-Activators/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Abstract: While transcription as regulated by histones and their post-translational modifications has been well described, the function of histone variants in this process remains poorly characterized. Potentially important insight into this process pertain to the frequently occurring mutations of H3.3, leading to G34 substitutions in childhood glioblastoma and giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB). In this study, we have established primary cell lines from GCTB patients and used them to uncover the influence of H3.3 G34W substitutions on cellular growth behavior, gene expression, and chromatin compaction. Primary cell lines with H3.3 G34W showed increased colony formation, infiltration and proliferation, known hallmarks of tumor development. Isogenic cell lines with H3.3 G34W recapitulated the increased proliferation observed in primary cells. Transcriptomic analysis of primary cells and tumor biopsies revealed slightly more downregulated gene expression, perhaps by increased chromatin compaction. We identified components related to splicing, most prominently hnRNPs, by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry that specifically interact with H3.3 G34W in the isogenic cell lines. RNA-sequencing analysis and hybridization-based validations further enforced splicing aberrations. Our data uncover a role for H3.3 in RNA processing and chromatin modulation that is blocked by the G34W substitution, potentially driving the tumorigenic process in GCTB.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29044188
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...