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  • 1
    Keywords: proliferation ; COMBINATION ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; GENE ; GENES ; COMPLEX ; FAMILY ; IMPACT ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; FREQUENCY ; LINKAGE ; VARIANTS ; TARGET ; COPY NUMBER ; ARRAYS ; NUMBER ; genotyping ; MUTATIONS ; REVEALS ; TARGETS ; CHILDREN ; DISORDERS ; VARIANT ; DETERMINANTS ; SCIENCE ; development ; LOCUS ; MOTILITY ; LOCI ; SPECTRUM DISORDERS ; Genetic ; RANGE ; Lead ; COPY NUMBER VARIANTS ; Copy number variation ; ANCESTRY ; GENETIC DISORDER ; HIDDEN-MARKOV MODEL ; SNP GENOTYPING DATA
    Abstract: The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of conditions characterized by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviours(1). Individuals with an ASD vary greatly in cognitive development, which can range from above average to intellectual disability(2). Although ASDs are known to be highly heritable (similar to 90%)(3), the underlying genetic determinants are still largely unknown. Here we analysed the genome-wide characteristics of rare (〈1% frequency) copy number variation in ASD using dense genotyping arrays. When comparing 996 ASD individuals of European ancestry to 1,287 matched controls, cases were found to carry a higher global burden of rare, genic copy number variants (CNVs) (1.19 fold, P=0.012), especially so for loci previously implicated in either ASD and/or intellectual disability (1.69 fold, P=3.4 x 10(-4)). Among the CNVs there were numerous de novo and inherited events, sometimes in combination in a given family, implicating many novel ASD genes such as SHANK2, SYNGAP1, DLGAP2 and the X-linked DDX53-PTCHD1 locus. We also discovered an enrichment of CNVs disrupting functional gene sets involved in cellular proliferation, projection and motility, and GTPase/Ras signalling. Our results reveal many new genetic and functional targets in ASD that may lead to final connected pathways
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20531469
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-06-14
    Description: Pulmonary CD4 T cells are critical in respiratory virus control, both by delivering direct effector function and through coordinating responses of other immune cells. Recent studies have shown that following influenza virus infection, virus-specific CD4 T cells are partitioned between pulmonary vasculature and lung tissue. However, very little is known about the peptide specificity or functional differences of CD4 T cells within these two compartments. Using a mouse model of influenza virus infection in conjunction with intravascular labeling in vivo , the cell surface phenotype, epitope specificity, and functional potential of the endogenous polyclonal CD4 T cell response was examined by tracking nine independent CD4 T cell epitope specificities. These studies revealed that tissue-localized CD4 cells were globally distinct from vascular cells in expression of markers associated with transendothelial migration, residency, and micropositioning. Despite these differences, there was little evidence for remodeling of the viral epitope specificity or cytokine potential as cells transition from vasculature to the highly inflamed lung tissue. Our studies also distinguished cells in the pulmonary vasculature from peripheral circulating CD4 T cells, providing support for the concept that the pulmonary vasculature does not simply reflect circulating cells that are trapped within the narrow confines of capillary vessels but rather is enriched in transitional cells primed in the draining lymph node that have specialized potential to enter the lung tissue. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells convey a multitude of functions in immunity to influenza, including those delivered in the lymph node and others conveyed by CD4 T cells that leave the lymph node, enter the blood, and extravasate into the lung tissue. Here, we show that the transition of recently primed CD4 cells detected in the lung vasculature undergo profound changes in expression of markers associated with tissue localization as they establish residence in the lung. However, this transition does not edit CD4 T cell epitope specificity or the cytokine potential of the CD4 T cells. Thus, CD4 T cells that enter the infected lung can convey diverse functions and have a sufficiently broad viral antigen specificity to detect the complex array of infected cells within the infected tissue, offering the potential for more effective protective function.
    Print ISSN: 0022-538X
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-5514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency through MSH6 inactivation has been identified in up to 30% of recurrent high-grade gliomas, and represents a key molecular mechanism underlying the acquired resistance to the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ). To develop a therapeutic strategy that could be effective in these TMZ-refractory gliomas, we first screened 13 DNA damage response modulators for their ability to suppress viability of MSH6-inactivated, TMZ-resistant glioma cells. We identified a PLK1 selective inhibitor, Volasertib, as the most potent in inhibiting proliferation of glioblastoma cells. PLK1 inhibition induced mitotic catastrophe, G 2 –M cell-cycle arrest, and DNA damage, leading to caspase-mediated apoptosis in glioblastoma cells. Importantly, therapeutic effects of PLK1 inhibitors were not influenced by MSH6 knockdown, indicating that their action is independent of MMR status of the cells. Systemic treatment with Volasertib potently inhibited tumor growth in an MMR-deficient, TMZ-resistant glioblastoma xenograft model. Further in vitro testing in established and patient-derived cell line panels revealed an association of PLK1 inhibitor efficacy with cellular Myc expression status. We found that cells with deregulated Myc are vulnerable to PLK1 inhibition, as Myc overexpression sensitizes, whereas its silencing desensitizes, glioblastoma cells to PLK1 inhibitors. This discovery is clinically relevant as glioma progression post-TMZ treatment is frequently accompanied by MYC genomic amplification and/or pathway activation. In conclusion, PLK inhibitor represents a novel therapeutic option for recurrent gliomas, including those TMZ-resistant from MMR deficiency. Genomic MYC alteration may serve as a biomarker for PLK inhibitor sensitivity, as Myc-driven tumors demonstrated pronounced responses.
    Print ISSN: 1535-7163
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-8514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
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    Olga Kondrashova; Monique Topp; Ksenija Nesic; Elizabeth Lieschke; Gwo-Yaw Ho; Maria I. Harrell; Giada V. Zapparoli; Alison Hadley; Robert Holian; Emma Boehm; Valerie Heong; Elaine Sanij; Richard B. Pearson; John J. Krais; Neil Johnson; Orla McNally; Sumitra Ananda; Kathryn Alsop; Karla J. Hutt; Scott H. Kaufmann; Kevin K. Lin; Thomas C. Harding; Nadia Traficante; G. Chenevix-Trench; A. Green; P. Webb; D. Gertig; S. Fereday; S. Moore; J. Hung; K. Harrap; T. Sadkowsky; N. Pandeya; M. Malt; A. Mellon; R. Robertson; T. Vanden Bergh; M. Jones; P. Mackenzie; J. Maidens; K. Nattress; Y. E. Chiew; A. Stenlake; H. Sullivan; B. Alexander; P. Ashover; S. Brown; T. Corrish; L. Green; L. Jackman; K. Ferguson; K. Martin; A. Martyn; B. Ranieri; J. White; V. Jayde; P. Mamers; L. Bowes; L. Galletta; D. Giles; J. Hendley; T. Schmidt; H. Shirley; C. Ball; C. Young; S. Viduka; H. Tran; S. Bilic; L. Glavinas; J. Brooks; R. Stuart-Harris; F. Kirsten; J. Rutovitz; P. Clingan; A. Glasgow; A. Proietto; S. Braye; G. Otton; J. Shannon; T. Bonaventura; J. Stewart; S. Begbie; M. Friedlander; D. Bell; S. Baron-Hay; A. Ferrier; G. Gard; D. Nevell; N. Pavlakis; S. Valmadre; B. Young; C. Camaris; R. Crouch; L. Edwards; N. Hacker; D. Marsden; G. Robertson; P. Beale; J. Beith; J. Carter; C. Dalrymple; R. Houghton; P. Russell; M. Links; J. Grygiel; J. Hill; A. Brand; K. Byth; R. Jaworski; P. Harnett; R. Sharma; G. Wain; B. Ward; D. Papadimos; A. Crandon; M. Cummings; K. Horwood; A. Obermair; L. Perrin; D. Wyld; J. Nicklin; M. Davy; M. K. Oehler; C. Hall; T. Dodd; T. Healy; K. Pittman; D. Henderson; J. Miller; J. Pierdes; P. Blomfield; D. Challis; R. McIntosh; A. Parker; B. Brown; R. Rome; D. Allen; P. Grant; S. Hyde; R. Laurie; M. Robbie; D. Healy; T. Jobling; T. Manolitsas; J. McNealage; P. Rogers; B. Susil; E. Sumithran; I. Simpson; K. Phillips; D. Rischin; S. Fox; D. Johnson; S. Lade; M. Loughrey; N. O’Callaghan; W. Murray; P. Waring; V. Billson; J. Pyman; D. Neesham; M. Quinn; C. Underhill; R. Bell; L. F. Ng; R. Blum; V. Ganju; I. Hammond; Y. Leung; A. McCartney; M. Buck; I. Haviv; D. Purdie; D. Whiteman; N. Zeps; Anna de; Fazio; Iain A. McNeish; David D. Bowtell; Elizabeth M. Swisher; Alexander Dobrovic; Matthew J. Wakefield; Clare L. Scott
    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2018-09-29
    Description: Methylation of all BRCA1 copies predicts response to the PARP inhibitor rucaparib in ovarian carcinoma Methylation of all 〈i〉BRCA1〈/i〉 copies predicts response to the PARP inhibitor rucaparib in ovarian carcinoma, Published online: 28 September 2018; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-05564-z Around 10% of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC) harbor BRCA1 promoter methylation, but it is uncertain how it predicts response to PARP inhibition. Here, the authors show that homozygous BRCA1 methylation predicts response to rucaparib while heterozygous methylation of BRCA1 predicts resistance in HGSOC.
    Electronic ISSN: 2041-1723
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-11-07
    Description: Parent-of-origin effects (POE) in mammals typically arise from maternal effects or imprinting. In some instances, such POE have been associated with psychiatric disorders, as well as with changes in a handful of animal behaviors. However, POE on complex traits such as behavior remain largely uncharacterized. Moreover, although both behavior and epigenetic effects are known to be modified by perinatal environmental exposures such as nutrient deficiency, the architecture of such environment-by-POE is mostly unexplored. To study POE and environment-by-POE, we employ a relatively neglected but especially powerful experimental system for POE-detection: reciprocal F1 hybrids (RF1s). We exposed female NOD/ShiLtJ $$\times $$ C57Bl/6J and C57Bl/6J x NOD/ShiLtJ mice, perinatally, to one of four different diets, then after weaning recorded a set of behaviors that model psychiatric disease. Whole-brain microarray expression data revealed an imprinting-enriched set of 15 genes subject to POE. The most-significant expression POE, on the non-imprinted gene Carmil1 (a.k.a. Lrrc16a ), was validated using qPCR in the same and in a new set of mice. Several behaviors, especially locomotor behaviors, also showed POE. Bayesian mediation analysis suggested Carmil1 expression suppresses behavioral POE, and that the imprinted gene Airn suppresses POE on Carmil1 expression. A suggestive diet-by-POE was observed on percent center time in the open field test, and a significant diet-by-POE was observed on one imprinted gene, Mir341 , and on 16 non-imprinted genes. The relatively small, tractable set of POE and diet-by-POE detected on behavior and expression here motivates further studies examining such effects across RF1s on multiple genetic backgrounds.
    Electronic ISSN: 2160-1836
    Topics: Biology
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-12-07
    Description: Journal of the American Chemical Society DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b09852
    Print ISSN: 0002-7863
    Electronic ISSN: 1520-5126
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-03-17
    Description: The intestinal immune system is exposed to a mixture of foreign antigens from diet, commensal flora and potential pathogens. Understanding how pathogen-specific immunity is elicited while avoiding inappropriate responses to the background of innocuous antigens is essential for understanding and treating intestinal infections and inflammatory diseases. The ingestion of protein antigen can induce oral tolerance, which is mediated in part by a subset of intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) that promote the development of regulatory T cells. The lamina propria (LP) underlies the expansive single-cell absorptive villous epithelium and contains a large population of DCs (CD11c(+) CD11b(+) MHCII(+) cells) comprised of two predominant subsets: CD103(+) CX(3)CR1(-) DCs, which promote IgA production, imprint gut homing on lymphocytes and induce the development of regulatory T cells, and CD103(-) CX(3)CR1(+) DCs (with features of macrophages), which promote tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production, colitis, and the development of T(H)17 T cells. However, the mechanisms by which different intestinal LP-DC subsets capture luminal antigens in vivo remains largely unexplored. Using a minimally disruptive in vivo imaging approach we show that in the steady state, small intestine goblet cells (GCs) function as passages delivering low molecular weight soluble antigens from the intestinal lumen to underlying CD103(+) LP-DCs. The preferential delivery of antigens to DCs with tolerogenic properties implies a key role for this GC function in intestinal immune homeostasis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3313460/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3313460/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McDole, Jeremiah R -- Wheeler, Leroy W -- McDonald, Keely G -- Wang, Baomei -- Konjufca, Vjollca -- Knoop, Kathryn A -- Newberry, Rodney D -- Miller, Mark J -- AI077600/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI083538/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI095550/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DK064798/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK085941/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA91842/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30-DK52574/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI077600/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI077600-04/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK064798/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK064798-08/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI083538/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI083538-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095550/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U01 AI095550-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Mar 14;483(7389):345-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10863.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22422267" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens/*immunology/metabolism ; Antigens, CD/*metabolism ; Dendritic Cells/cytology/*immunology/*metabolism ; Diet ; Goblet Cells/*immunology/metabolism ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; Immune Tolerance/*immunology ; Immunoglobulin A/immunology ; Integrin alpha Chains/*metabolism ; Intestine, Small/cytology/*immunology/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton ; Solubility ; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology ; Th17 Cells/immunology ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-01-28
    Description: Earth system models project that the tropical land carbon sink will decrease in size in response to an increase in warming and drought during this century, probably causing a positive climate feedback. But available data are too limited at present to test the predicted changes in the tropical carbon balance in response to climate change. Long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide data provide a global record that integrates the interannual variability of the global carbon balance. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that most of this variability originates in the terrestrial biosphere. In particular, the year-to-year variations in the atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate (CGR) are thought to be the result of fluctuations in the carbon fluxes of tropical land areas. Recently, the response of CGR to tropical climate interannual variability was used to put a constraint on the sensitivity of tropical land carbon to climate change. Here we use the long-term CGR record from Mauna Loa and the South Pole to show that the sensitivity of CGR to tropical temperature interannual variability has increased by a factor of 1.9 +/- 0.3 in the past five decades. We find that this sensitivity was greater when tropical land regions experienced drier conditions. This suggests that the sensitivity of CGR to interannual temperature variations is regulated by moisture conditions, even though the direct correlation between CGR and tropical precipitation is weak. We also find that present terrestrial carbon cycle models do not capture the observed enhancement in CGR sensitivity in the past five decades. More realistic model predictions of future carbon cycle and climate feedbacks require a better understanding of the processes driving the response of tropical ecosystems to drought and warming.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Xuhui -- Piao, Shilong -- Ciais, Philippe -- Friedlingstein, Pierre -- Myneni, Ranga B -- Cox, Peter -- Heimann, Martin -- Miller, John -- Peng, Shushi -- Wang, Tao -- Yang, Hui -- Chen, Anping -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):212-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12915. Epub 2014 Jan 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ; 1] Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China [2] Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China. ; 1] Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China [2] Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, CEA CNRS UVSQ, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France. ; College of Engineering, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK. ; Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07701 Jena, Germany. ; 1] Global Monitoring Division, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA [2] Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1003, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24463514" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antarctic Regions ; Atmosphere/chemistry ; Carbon/analysis/metabolism ; Carbon Cycle/*physiology ; Carbon Dioxide/metabolism ; Carbon Sequestration ; Droughts ; Ecosystem ; Global Warming ; Hawaii ; History, 20th Century ; History, 21st Century ; Humidity ; Models, Theoretical ; Rain ; *Temperature ; *Tropical Climate
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-05-16
    Description: Many natural products that contain basic nitrogen atoms--for example alkaloids like morphine and quinine-have the potential to treat a broad range of human diseases. However, the presence of a nitrogen atom in a target molecule can complicate its chemical synthesis because of the basicity of nitrogen atoms and their susceptibility to oxidation. Obtaining such compounds by chemical synthesis can be further complicated by the presence of multiple nitrogen atoms, but it can be done by the selective introduction and removal of functional groups that mitigate basicity. Here we use such a strategy to complete the chemical syntheses of citrinalin B and cyclopiamine B. The chemical connections that have been realized as a result of these syntheses, in addition to the isolation of both 17-hydroxycitrinalin B and citrinalin C (which contains a bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane structural unit) through carbon-13 feeding studies, support the existence of a common bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane-containing biogenetic precursor to these compounds, as has been proposed previously.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4117207/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4117207/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mercado-Marin, Eduardo V -- Garcia-Reynaga, Pablo -- Romminger, Stelamar -- Pimenta, Eli F -- Romney, David K -- Lodewyk, Michael W -- Williams, David E -- Andersen, Raymond J -- Miller, Scott J -- Tantillo, Dean J -- Berlinck, Roberto G S -- Sarpong, Richmond -- GM096403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 086374/PHS HHS/ -- R01 GM096403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10-RR027172/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 15;509(7500):318-24. doi: 10.1038/nature13273.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2]. ; Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 780, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil. ; Department of Chemistry, Yale University, PO Box 208107, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T IZI, Canada. ; Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24828190" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alkaloids/biosynthesis/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/*isolation & purification ; Biological Products/*chemical synthesis/chemistry ; Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic ; Indole Alkaloids/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/*isolation & ; purification/metabolism ; Indolizidines/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/*isolation & purification/metabolism ; Molecular Structure ; Nitrogen/chemistry ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxygen/metabolism ; Stereoisomerism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-03
    Description: The increasing demands placed on natural resources for fuel and food production require that we explore the use of efficient, sustainable feedstocks such as brown macroalgae. The full potential of brown macroalgae as feedstocks for commercial-scale fuel ethanol production, however, requires extensive re-engineering of the alginate and mannitol catabolic pathways in the standard industrial microbe Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we present the discovery of an alginate monomer (4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronate, or DEHU) transporter from the alginolytic eukaryote Asteromyces cruciatus. The genomic integration and overexpression of the gene encoding this transporter, together with the necessary bacterial alginate and deregulated native mannitol catabolism genes, conferred the ability of an S. cerevisiae strain to efficiently metabolize DEHU and mannitol. When this platform was further adapted to grow on mannitol and DEHU under anaerobic conditions, it was capable of ethanol fermentation from mannitol and DEHU, achieving titres of 4.6% (v/v) (36.2 g l(-1)) and yields up to 83% of the maximum theoretical yield from consumed sugars. These results show that all major sugars in brown macroalgae can be used as feedstocks for biofuels and value-added renewable chemicals in a manner that is comparable to traditional arable-land-based feedstocks.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Enquist-Newman, Maria -- Faust, Ann Marie E -- Bravo, Daniel D -- Santos, Christine Nicole S -- Raisner, Ryan M -- Hanel, Arthur -- Sarvabhowman, Preethi -- Le, Chi -- Regitsky, Drew D -- Cooper, Susan R -- Peereboom, Lars -- Clark, Alana -- Martinez, Yessica -- Goldsmith, Joshua -- Cho, Min Y -- Donohoue, Paul D -- Luo, Lily -- Lamberson, Brigit -- Tamrakar, Pramila -- Kim, Edward J -- Villari, Jeffrey L -- Gill, Avinash -- Tripathi, Shital A -- Karamchedu, Padma -- Paredes, Carlos J -- Rajgarhia, Vineet -- Kotlar, Hans Kristian -- Bailey, Richard B -- Miller, Dennis J -- Ohler, Nicholas L -- Swimmer, Candace -- Yoshikuni, Yasuo -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 9;505(7482):239-43. doi: 10.1038/nature12771. Epub 2013 Dec 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Bio Architecture Lab Inc., 604 Bancroft Way, Suite A, Berkeley, California 94710, USA [2]. ; 1] Bio Architecture Lab Inc., 604 Bancroft Way, Suite A, Berkeley, California 94710, USA [2] Manus Biosynthesis Inc., 790 Memorial Drive, Suite 102, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (C.N.S.S.); Calysta Energy, 1140 O'Brien Drive, Menlo Park, California 94025 (D.D.R.); Sutro Biopharma lnc., 310 Utah Avenue, Suite 150, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA (A.G.); Total New Energies USA, 5858 Horton Street, Emeryville, California 94560 (S.A.T.; V.R.). ; Bio Architecture Lab Inc., 604 Bancroft Way, Suite A, Berkeley, California 94710, USA. ; Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, 2527 Engineering Building, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226, USA. ; Statoil ASA, Statoil Research Centre, Arkitekt Ebbells vei 10, Rotvoll, 7005 Trondheim, Norway. ; 1] Bio Architecture Lab Inc., 604 Bancroft Way, Suite A, Berkeley, California 94710, USA [2] BALChile S.A., Badajoz 100, Oficina 1404, Las Condes, Santiago 7550000, Chile [3] BAL Biofuels S.A., Badajoz 100, Oficina 1404, Las Condes, Santiago 7550000, Chile.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24291791" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alginates/metabolism ; Anaerobiosis ; Ascomycota/genetics/metabolism ; Biofuels/*supply & distribution ; Biotechnology ; *Carbohydrate Metabolism ; Carrier Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Ethanol/*metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Fermentation ; Genetic Complementation Test ; *Genetic Engineering ; Glucuronic Acid/metabolism ; Hexuronic Acids/metabolism ; Mannitol/metabolism ; Phaeophyta/genetics/*metabolism ; Quinic Acid/metabolism ; Reproducibility of Results ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics/*metabolism ; Seaweed/genetics/metabolism ; Uronic Acids/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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