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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-02-10
    Description: Tumorigenesis is a clonal evolution process that is initiated from single cells within otherwise histologically normal tissue. It is unclear how single, sporadic mutant cells that have sustained oncogenic alterations evolve within a tightly regulated tissue environment. Here we investigated the effects of inducing oncogene expression in single cells in organotypic mammary acini as a model to elucidate the processes by which oncogenic alterations initiate clonal progression from organized epithelial environments. Sporadic cells induced to overexpress oncogenes that specifically perturb cell-cycle checkpoints (for example, E7 from human papilloma virus 16, and cyclin D1), deregulate Myc transcription or activate AKT signalling remained quiescent within growth-arrested acini. By contrast, single cells that overexpress ERBB2 initiated a cellular cascade involving cell translocation from the epithelial layer, as well as luminal outgrowth that is characteristic of neoplastic progression in early-stage epithelial tumours. In addition, ERBB2-mediated cell translocation to the lumen was found to depend on extracellular-regulated kinase and matrix metalloproteinase activities, and genetic alterations that perturb local cell-matrix adhesion drove cell translocation. We also provide evidence that luminal cell translocation may drive clonal selection by promoting either the death or the expansion of quiescent oncogene-expressing cells, depending on whether the pre-existing alterations allow anchorage-independent survival and growth. Our data show that the initial outgrowth of single oncogene-expressing cells from organized epithelial structures is a highly regulated process, and we propose that a cell translocation mechanism allows sporadic mutant cells to evade suppressive micro-environments and elicits clonal selection for survival and proliferative expansion outside the native niches of these cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3297969/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3297969/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Leung, Cheuk T -- Brugge, Joan S -- CA080111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA105134/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA105134-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 8;482(7385):410-3. doi: 10.1038/nature10826.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22318515" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acinar Cells/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Cell Adhesion ; Cell Culture Techniques ; Cell Line ; Cell Movement ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/*genetics/pathology ; Cells, Cultured ; Cellular Microenvironment/*physiology ; *Clonal Evolution ; Contact Inhibition ; Epithelial Cells/cytology/*metabolism/*pathology ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics/metabolism ; Tumor Microenvironment
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-04-18
    Description: Centrosome amplification has long been recognized as a feature of human tumours; however, its role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Centrosome amplification is poorly tolerated by non-transformed cells and, in the absence of selection, extra centrosomes are spontaneously lost. Thus, the high frequency of centrosome amplification, particularly in more aggressive tumours, raises the possibility that extra centrosomes could, in some contexts, confer advantageous characteristics that promote tumour progression. Using a three-dimensional model system and other approaches to culture human mammary epithelial cells, we find that centrosome amplification triggers cell invasion. This invasive behaviour is similar to that induced by overexpression of the breast cancer oncogene ERBB2 (ref. 4) and indeed enhances invasiveness triggered by ERBB2. Our data indicate that, through increased centrosomal microtubule nucleation, centrosome amplification increases Rac1 activity, which disrupts normal cell-cell adhesion and promotes invasion. These findings demonstrate that centrosome amplification, a structural alteration of the cytoskeleton, can promote features of malignant transformation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4061398/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4061398/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Godinho, Susana A -- Picone, Remigio -- Burute, Mithila -- Dagher, Regina -- Su, Ying -- Leung, Cheuk T -- Polyak, Kornelia -- Brugge, Joan S -- Thery, Manuel -- Pellman, David -- 310472/European Research Council/International -- GM083299-1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 5;510(7503):167-71. doi: 10.1038/nature13277. Epub 2014 Apr 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK (S.A.G.); Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (C.T.L.). ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Science pour le Vivant, UMR5168 CEA/UJF/INRA/CNRS, Grenoble, France [2] Hopital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, U1160 INSERM/AP-HP/Universite Paris Diderot, Paris 75010, France [3] CYTOO SA, Grenoble 38054, France. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK (S.A.G.); Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (C.T.L.). ; Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Science pour le Vivant, UMR5168 CEA/UJF/INRA/CNRS, Grenoble, France [2] Hopital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, U1160 INSERM/AP-HP/Universite Paris Diderot, Paris 75010, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24739973" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aneuploidy ; Breast/cytology/pathology ; Breast Neoplasms/genetics/*pathology ; Cell Adhesion ; Cell Line ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics/*pathology ; Centrosome/*pathology ; Disease Progression ; Enzyme Activation ; Epithelial Cells/cytology/pathology ; *Genes, erbB-2 ; Humans ; Microtubules/chemistry/metabolism/pathology ; Neoplasm Invasiveness/pathology ; Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics/metabolism ; rac1 GTP-Binding Protein/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-10-28
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Harris, Isaac S -- Brugge, Joan S -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 12;527(7577):170-1. doi: 10.1038/nature15644. Epub 2015 Oct 21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell Biology and the Ludwig Center at Harvard, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26503052" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Melanoma/*metabolism/*pathology ; Neoplasm Metastasis/*prevention & control ; *Oxidative Stress
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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