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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-02-26
    Description: Metarhizium anisopliae infects mosquitoes through the cuticle and proliferates in the hemolymph. To allow M. anisopliae to combat malaria in mosquitoes with advanced malaria infections, we produced recombinant strains expressing molecules that target sporozoites as they travel through the hemolymph to the salivary glands. Eleven days after a Plasmodium-infected blood meal, mosquitoes were treated with M. anisopliae expressing salivary gland and midgut peptide 1 (SM1), which blocks attachment of sporozoites to salivary glands; a single-chain antibody that agglutinates sporozoites; or scorpine, which is an antimicrobial toxin. These reduced sporozoite counts by 71%, 85%, and 90%, respectively. M. anisopliae expressing scorpine and an [SM1](8):scorpine fusion protein reduced sporozoite counts by 98%, suggesting that Metarhizium-mediated inhibition of Plasmodium development could be a powerful weapon for combating malaria.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153607/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153607/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fang, Weiguo -- Vega-Rodriguez, Joel -- Ghosh, Anil K -- Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo -- Kang, Angray -- St Leger, Raymond J -- 5R21A1079429-02/PHS HHS/ -- R01 AI031478/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI079429/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088033/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Feb 25;331(6020):1074-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1199115.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, 4112 Plant Sciences Building, College Park, MD 20742, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21350178" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anopheles gambiae/*microbiology/*parasitology/physiology ; Antibodies, Protozoan/immunology ; Base Sequence ; Cloning, Molecular ; Defensins/genetics/metabolism ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; Hemolymph/metabolism/microbiology/parasitology ; Humans ; Insect Vectors/*microbiology/*parasitology/physiology ; Malaria, Falciparum/transmission ; Metarhizium/*genetics/physiology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oligopeptides/genetics/metabolism ; Organisms, Genetically Modified ; Pest Control, Biological ; Plasmodium falciparum/*physiology ; Protozoan Proteins/immunology ; Salivary Glands/metabolism/parasitology ; Spores, Fungal/physiology ; Sporozoites/physiology ; Transformation, Genetic ; Transgenes
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-04-16
    Description: Drug resistance compromises control of malaria. Here, we show that resistance to a commonly used antimalarial medication, atovaquone, is apparently unable to spread. Atovaquone pressure selects parasites with mutations in cytochrome b, a respiratory protein with low but essential activity in the mammalian blood phase of the parasite life cycle. Resistance mutations rescue parasites from the drug but later prove lethal in the mosquito phase, where parasites require full respiration. Unable to respire efficiently, resistant parasites fail to complete mosquito development, arresting their life cycle. Because cytochrome b is encoded by the maternally inherited parasite mitochondrion, even outcrossing with wild-type strains cannot facilitate spread of resistance. Lack of transmission suggests that resistance will be unable to spread in the field, greatly enhancing the utility of atovaquone in malaria control.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Goodman, Christopher D -- Siregar, Josephine E -- Mollard, Vanessa -- Vega-Rodriguez, Joel -- Syafruddin, Din -- Matsuoka, Hiroyuki -- Matsuzaki, Motomichi -- Toyama, Tomoko -- Sturm, Angelika -- Cozijnsen, Anton -- Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo -- Kita, Kiyoshi -- Marzuki, Sangkot -- McFadden, Geoffrey I -- AI031478/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- RR00052/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Apr 15;352(6283):349-53. doi: 10.1126/science.aad9279.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia. gim@unimelb.edu.au deang@unimelb.edu.au. ; School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia. Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, JI Diponegoro no. 69, Jakarta, 10430, Indonesia. Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. ; School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia. ; Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Malaria Research Institute, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. ; Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, JI Diponegoro no. 69, Jakarta, 10430, Indonesia. Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Hasanuddin University, Jalan Perintis Kemerdekaan Km10, Makassar 90245, Indonesia. ; Division of Medical Zoology, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan. ; Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. ; Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. School of Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nagasaki University, Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan. ; Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, JI Diponegoro no. 69, Jakarta, 10430, Indonesia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27081071" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anopheles/*parasitology ; Antimalarials/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Atovaquone/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Cell Line ; Cytochromes b/*genetics ; Drug Resistance/*genetics ; Genes, Mitochondrial/genetics ; Humans ; Life Cycle Stages/drug effects/genetics ; Malaria/drug therapy/*parasitology/transmission ; Male ; Mice ; Mitochondria/*genetics ; Mutation ; Plasmodium berghei/*drug effects/genetics/growth & development ; Selection, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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