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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Addiction biology 8 (2003), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1369-1600
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The Mullerian ducts are the embryological precursors of the female reproductive tract, including the uterus; anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) has a key role in the regulation of foetal sexual differentiation. Anti-Mullerian hormone inhibits endometrial tumour growth in experimental models by stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. To date, there are no prospective epidemiologic data on circulating AMH and endometrial cancer risk. METHODS: We investigated this association among women premenopausal at blood collection in a multicohort study including participants from eight studies located in the United States, Europe, and China. We identified 329 endometrial cancer cases and 339 matched controls. Anti-Mullerian hormone concentrations in blood were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) across tertiles and for a doubling of AMH concentrations (ORlog2). Subgroup analyses were performed by ages at blood donation and diagnosis, oral contraceptive use, and tumour characteristics. RESULTS: Anti-Mullerian hormone was not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer overall (ORlog2: 1.07 (0.99-1.17)), or with any of the examined subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Although experimental models implicate AMH in endometrial cancer growth inhibition, our findings do not support a role for circulating AMH in the aetiology of endometrial cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28873086
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  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Circulating oxysterols have been proposed as biological markers of disease risk. However, within-person reproducibility of circulating oxysterols over time is not well established. METHODS: We evaluated the one-year reproducibility of 11 oxysterols and lanosterol among 30 postmenopausal women with repeat blood samples in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) - Heidelberg, Germany cohort. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was performed to quantify serum concentrations of 22R-hydroxycholesterol, 2beta-hydroxycholesterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, 27-hydroxycholesterol, 22S-hydroxycholeterol, 24,2beta-epoxycholesterol, 5alpha,6beta-dihydroxycholestanol, 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol, 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol, 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol, 24-dihydrolanosterol, and lanosterol. We evaluated Spearman correlations and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between quantifiable concentrations measured in repeat samples taken one-year apart to estimate within-person reproducibility. RESULTS: Spearman correlations (ICCs) over one year ranged from 0 (ICC=0.10) for 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol and 0.10 (ICC=0.20) for 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol, representing low within-person stability, to 0.81 (ICC=0.75) for 27-hydroxycholesterol and 0.86 (ICC=0.91) for 24S-hydroxycholesterol, representing relatively high within-person stability. Correlations between oxysterols and lanosterol ranged from 0.01 between 24S-hydroxycholesterol and lanosterol to 0.70 between 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol and 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that for 27-hydroxycholesterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol and lanosterol, a single serum measurement can reliably estimate average levels over a one-year period. Circulating oxysterols are of increasing interest in epidemiologic studies of chronic disease risk including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Our data suggest that within-person stability of oxysterols differs depending on the individual oxysterol evaluated. We identified four oxysterols and lanosterol as stable over time to inform the use of circulating oxysterols in epidemiologic studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29108727
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  • 4
    Abstract: CA125 is the best ovarian cancer early detection marker to date; however, sensitivity is limited and complementary markers are required to improve discrimination between ovarian cancer cases and non-cases. Anti-CA125 autoantibodies are observed in circulation. Our objective was to evaluate whether these antibodies (1) can serve as early detection markers, providing evidence of an immune response to a developing tumor, and (2) modify the discriminatory capacity of CA125 by either masking CA125 levels (resulting in lower discrimination) or acting synergistically to improve discrimination between cases and non-cases. We investigated these objectives using a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (EPIC) including 250 cases diagnosed within 4 years of blood collection and up to 4 matched controls. Circulating CA125 antigen and antibody levels were quantified using an electrochemiluminescence assay. Adjusted areas under the curve (aAUCs) by 2-year lag-time intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression calibrated towards the absolute risk estimates from a pre-existing epidemiological risk model as an offset-variable. Anti-CA125 levels alone did not discriminate cases from controls. For cases diagnosed 〈2 years after blood collection, discrimination by CA125 antigen was suggestively higher with higher anti-CA125 levels (aAUC, highest antibody tertile: 0.84 [0.76-0.92]; lowest tertile: 0.76 [0.67-0.86]; phet =0.06). We provide the first evidence of potentially synergistic discrimination effects of CA125 and anti-CA125 antibodies in ovarian early detection. If these findings are replicated, evaluating CA125 in the context of its antibody may improve ovarian cancer early detection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29159934
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  • 5
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; COHORT ; WOMEN ; CONSUMPTION ; phytoestrogens ; enterolignans ; lignan ; SERUM ENTEROLACTONE ; FLAXSEED ; Food sources
    Abstract: We previously reported that high concentrations of enterolactone, a lignan metabolite, are associated with lower mortality in 1,140 breast cancer patients from Germany. Using an extended set of 2,182 patients aged 50-74 years at diagnosis (2001-2005) and prospectively followed up until 2009, we investigated whether the association with mortality differs by lifestyle factors and tumor characteristics. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression. Potential differential effects by tumor characteristics and lifestyle factors were assessed and a meta-analysis of five studies addressing lignan exposure and breast cancer prognosis was performed to summarize evidence. Median enterolactone concentrations were 17.4 (+/-30.5 standard deviation) and 22.9 nmol L(-1) (+/-44.8), respectively, for 269 deceased and 1,913 patients still alive. High enterolactone concentrations were significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality (per 10 nmol L(-1) : HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90-0.98), breast cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.94, 0.89-0.99), and distant disease-free survival (HR 0.94, 0.90-0.98). Associations were found for stage 0-IIIA but not for stage IIIB-IV disease (phet = 0.01) and were stronger in patients with BMI 〈25 kg m(-2) than those with BMI 〉/=25 (phet = 0.04). In patients with healthy lifestyle (BMI 〈25, nonsmoker, physically active), the inverse association with all-cause mortality was still apparent (HR 0.92, 0.85-0.99). The meta-analysis yielded significant associations both for all-cause (HR 0.57, 0.42-0.78) and breast cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.54, 0.39-0.75). Our findings show that high lignan exposure is associated with reduced mortality in breast cancer patients. The inverse association observed in this study cannot be entirely explained by a healthy lifestyle.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24436155
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  • 6
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; IN-VIVO ; THERAPY ; PROTEIN ; PATIENT ; COMPLEX ; DOMAIN ; ANTIGEN ; T-CELLS ; BIOLOGY ; antibodies ; antibody ; antigen presentation ; GENE-THERAPY ; AUTOANTIBODIES ; JUNCTIONAL EPIDERMOLYSIS-BULLOSA ; REGULATORY CELLS ; TOLERANCE INDUCTION ; BP180 ; DEC-205 ; DEC205 ; skin grafting ; type XVII collagen
    Abstract: Antibodies, specific to murine DEC205, can be used to target antigens to dendritic cells. The immunodominant domain of human type XVII collagen, hNC16A, was fused to this antibody (DEC-hNC16A) and was administered as expression plasmid by gene gun transfection with the aim of inducing tolerance to human type XVII collagen in a skin transplantation model. Mice transfected with DEC-hNC16A were challenged with skin grafts from transgenic mice engineered to express human type XVII collagen. Graft survival was either prolonged or grafts were accepted infinitely (33% and 16%, respectively) upon treatment with DEC-hNC16A while 100% of grafts were rejected in untreated controls. Graft acceptance was associated with the absence of a CD4+ infiltrate and a dense CD8+ T-cell infiltrate and was not strictly dependent on antibody production. Our results show that DEC-hNC16A targets dendritic cells in vivo leading to prolonged survival of transgenic skin grafts. This indicates that DEC205-targeting may be used for the induction of tolerance to skin antigens, which would increase the chances of successful skin gene therapy of epidermolysis bullosa patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22509840
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