Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-02-22
    Description: Recurrent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 have been identified in gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemias (AML) and chondrosarcomas, and share a novel enzymatic property of producing 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) from alpha-ketoglutarate. Here we report that 2HG-producing IDH mutants can prevent the histone demethylation that is required for lineage-specific progenitor cells to differentiate into terminally differentiated cells. In tumour samples from glioma patients, IDH mutations were associated with a distinct gene expression profile enriched for genes expressed in neural progenitor cells, and this was associated with increased histone methylation. To test whether the ability of IDH mutants to promote histone methylation contributes to a block in cell differentiation in non-transformed cells, we tested the effect of neomorphic IDH mutants on adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Introduction of either mutant IDH or cell-permeable 2HG was associated with repression of the inducible expression of lineage-specific differentiation genes and a block to differentiation. This correlated with a significant increase in repressive histone methylation marks without observable changes in promoter DNA methylation. Gliomas were found to have elevated levels of similar histone repressive marks. Stable transfection of a 2HG-producing mutant IDH into immortalized astrocytes resulted in progressive accumulation of histone methylation. Of the marks examined, increased H3K9 methylation reproducibly preceded a rise in DNA methylation as cells were passaged in culture. Furthermore, we found that the 2HG-inhibitable H3K9 demethylase KDM4C was induced during adipocyte differentiation, and that RNA-interference suppression of KDM4C was sufficient to block differentiation. Together these data demonstrate that 2HG can inhibit histone demethylation and that inhibition of histone demethylation can be sufficient to block the differentiation of non-transformed cells.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478770/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478770/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lu, Chao -- Ward, Patrick S -- Kapoor, Gurpreet S -- Rohle, Dan -- Turcan, Sevin -- Abdel-Wahab, Omar -- Edwards, Christopher R -- Khanin, Raya -- Figueroa, Maria E -- Melnick, Ari -- Wellen, Kathryn E -- O'Rourke, Donald M -- Berger, Shelley L -- Chan, Timothy A -- Levine, Ross L -- Mellinghoff, Ingo K -- Thompson, Craig B -- R01 CA078831/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA105463/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54CA143798/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 15;483(7390):474-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10860.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Biology and Genetics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343901" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3-L1 Cells ; Adipocytes/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Animals ; Astrocytes/cytology/drug effects ; Cell Differentiation/drug effects/*genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; DNA Methylation/drug effects ; Enzyme Induction/drug effects ; Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Glioma/enzymology/genetics/pathology ; Glutarates/metabolism/pharmacology ; HEK293 Cells ; Histones/*metabolism ; Humans ; Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/antagonists & inhibitors/*genetics/metabolism ; Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/antagonists & ; inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Methylation/drug effects ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sivanand, Sharanya -- Wellen, Kathryn E -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 6;524(7563):40-1. doi: 10.1038/nature14638. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200344" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-01-22
    Description: Cellular senescence both protects multicellular organisms from cancer and contributes to their ageing. The pre-eminent tumour suppressor p53 has an important role in the induction and maintenance of senescence, but how it carries out this function remains poorly understood. In addition, although increasing evidence supports the idea that metabolic changes underlie many cell-fate decisions and p53-mediated tumour suppression, few connections between metabolic enzymes and senescence have been established. Here we describe a new mechanism by which p53 links these functions. We show that p53 represses the expression of the tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-associated malic enzymes ME1 and ME2 in human and mouse cells. Both malic enzymes are important for NADPH production, lipogenesis and glutamine metabolism, but ME2 has a more profound effect. Through the inhibition of malic enzymes, p53 regulates cell metabolism and proliferation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally activates p53 through distinct MDM2- and AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated mechanisms in a feed-forward manner, bolstering this pathway and enhancing p53 activation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 also modulates the outcome of p53 activation, leading to strong induction of senescence, but not apoptosis, whereas enforced expression of either malic enzyme suppresses senescence. Our findings define physiological functions of malic enzymes, demonstrate a positive-feedback mechanism that sustains p53 activation, and reveal a connection between metabolism and senescence mediated by p53.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561500/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561500/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Peng -- Du, Wenjing -- Mancuso, Anthony -- Wellen, Kathryn E -- Yang, Xiaolu -- CA088868/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016520/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA088868/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 31;493(7434):689-93. doi: 10.1038/nature11776. Epub 2013 Jan 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cancer Biology and Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23334421" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 3T3 Cells ; Animals ; Antibiotics, Antineoplastic/pharmacology ; Cell Aging/physiology ; Cell Line ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Doxorubicin/pharmacology ; *Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Gene Silencing ; Glucose/metabolism ; Glutamine/metabolism ; HCT116 Cells ; Humans ; Lipids/biosynthesis ; Malate Dehydrogenase/genetics/*metabolism ; Malate Dehydrogenase (NADP+)/genetics/*metabolism ; Mice ; NADP/metabolism ; Protein Binding/drug effects ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2018-05-11
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-04-25
    Description: The metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is the required acetyl donor for lysine acetylation and thereby links metabolism, signaling, and epigenetics. Nutrient availability alters acetyl-CoA levels in cancer cells, correlating with changes in global histone acetylation and gene expression. However, the specific molecular mechanisms through which acetyl-CoA production impacts gene expression and its functional roles in promoting malignant phenotypes are poorly understood. Here, using histone H3 Lys27 acetylation (H3K27ac) ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with next-generation sequencing) with normalization to an exogenous reference genome (ChIP-Rx), we found that changes in acetyl-CoA abundance trigger site-specific regulation of H3K27ac, correlating with gene expression as opposed to uniformly modulating this mark at all genes. Genes involved in integrin signaling and cell adhesion were identified as acetyl-CoA-responsive in glioblastoma cells, and we demonstrate that ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)-dependent acetyl-CoA production promotes cell migration and adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Mechanistically, the transcription factor NFAT1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells 1) was found to mediate acetyl-CoA-dependent gene regulation and cell adhesion. This occurs through modulation of Ca 2+ signals, triggering NFAT1 nuclear translocation when acetyl-CoA is abundant. The findings of this study thus establish that acetyl-CoA impacts H3K27ac at specific loci, correlating with gene expression, and that expression of cell adhesion genes are driven by acetyl-CoA in part through activation of Ca 2+ –NFAT signaling.
    Print ISSN: 0890-9369
    Topics: Biology
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...