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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-07-01
    Description: The basolateral amygdala (BLA) has a crucial role in emotional learning irrespective of valence. The BLA projection to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is thought to modulate cue-triggered motivated behaviours, but our understanding of the interaction between these two brain regions has been limited by the inability to manipulate neural-circuit elements of this pathway selectively during behaviour. To circumvent this limitation, we used in vivo optogenetic stimulation or inhibition of glutamatergic fibres from the BLA to the NAc, coupled with intracranial pharmacology and ex vivo electrophysiology. Here we show that optical stimulation of the pathway from the BLA to the NAc in mice reinforces behavioural responding to earn additional optical stimulation of these synaptic inputs. Optical stimulation of these glutamatergic fibres required intra-NAc dopamine D1-type receptor signalling, but not D2-type receptor signalling. Brief optical inhibition of fibres from the BLA to the NAc reduced cue-evoked intake of sucrose, demonstrating an important role of this specific pathway in controlling naturally occurring reward-related behaviour. Moreover, although optical stimulation of glutamatergic fibres from the medial prefrontal cortex to the NAc also elicited reliable excitatory synaptic responses, optical self-stimulation behaviour was not observed by activation of this pathway. These data indicate that whereas the BLA is important for processing both positive and negative affect, the glutamatergic pathway from the BLA to the NAc, in conjunction with dopamine signalling in the NAc, promotes motivated behavioural responding. Thus, optogenetic manipulation of anatomically distinct synaptic inputs to the NAc reveals functionally distinct properties of these inputs in controlling reward-seeking behaviours.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775282/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775282/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stuber, Garret D -- Sparta, Dennis R -- Stamatakis, Alice M -- van Leeuwen, Wieke A -- Hardjoprajitno, Juanita E -- Cho, Saemi -- Tye, Kay M -- Kempadoo, Kimberly A -- Zhang, Feng -- Deisseroth, Karl -- Bonci, Antonello -- DA029325/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F32AA018610/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA032750/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R21 DA029325/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jun 29;475(7356):377-80. doi: 10.1038/nature10194.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychiatry, UNC Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. gstuber@med.unc.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21716290" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/cytology/*physiology ; Animals ; Behavior, Addictive/physiopathology ; Cues ; Dopamine/metabolism ; Drinking ; Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials/*physiology ; Glutamic Acid/metabolism ; Light ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Nerve Fibers/physiology ; Neural Pathways/*physiology ; Neurons/metabolism ; Nucleus Accumbens/cytology/*physiology ; Patch-Clamp Techniques ; Photic Stimulation ; Receptors, Dopamine D1/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; *Reward ; Rhodopsin/genetics/metabolism ; Sucrose/metabolism/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-11-20
    Description: The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to participate in high-level control of the generation of behaviours (including the decision to execute actions); indeed, imaging and lesion studies in human beings have revealed that PFC dysfunction can lead to either impulsive states with increased tendency to initiate action, or to amotivational states characterized by symptoms such as reduced activity, hopelessness and depressed mood. Considering the opposite valence of these two phenotypes as well as the broad complexity of other tasks attributed to PFC, we sought to elucidate the PFC circuitry that favours effortful behavioural responses to challenging situations. Here we develop and use a quantitative method for the continuous assessment and control of active response to a behavioural challenge, synchronized with single-unit electrophysiology and optogenetics in freely moving rats. In recording from the medial PFC (mPFC), we observed that many neurons were not simply movement-related in their spike-firing patterns but instead were selectively modulated from moment to moment, according to the animal's decision to act in a challenging situation. Surprisingly, we next found that direct activation of principal neurons in the mPFC had no detectable causal effect on this behaviour. We tested whether this behaviour could be causally mediated by only a subclass of mPFC cells defined by specific downstream wiring. Indeed, by leveraging optogenetic projection-targeting to control cells with specific efferent wiring patterns, we found that selective activation of those mPFC cells projecting to the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a serotonergic nucleus implicated in major depressive disorder, induced a profound, rapid and reversible effect on selection of the active behavioural state. These results may be of importance in understanding the neural circuitry underlying normal and pathological patterns of action selection and motivation in behaviour.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Warden, Melissa R -- Selimbeyoglu, Aslihan -- Mirzabekov, Julie J -- Lo, Maisie -- Thompson, Kimberly R -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Adhikari, Avishek -- Tye, Kay M -- Frank, Loren M -- Deisseroth, Karl -- 1F32MH088010-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- F32 MH088010/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 20;492(7429):428-32. doi: 10.1038/nature11617.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. mwarden@stanford.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23160494" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Axons/physiology ; Behavior, Animal/*physiology ; Depression/psychology ; Electrophysiology ; Locomotion/physiology ; Male ; Motivation/*physiology ; Neurons/*physiology ; Optogenetics ; Prefrontal Cortex/*physiology ; Raphe Nuclei/*physiology ; Rats ; Rats, Long-Evans ; Swimming/*physiology ; Synapses/physiology ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-03-22
    Description: Behavioural states in mammals, such as the anxious state, are characterized by several features that are coordinately regulated by diverse nervous system outputs, ranging from behavioural choice patterns to changes in physiology (in anxiety, exemplified respectively by risk-avoidance and respiratory rate alterations). Here we investigate if and how defined neural projections arising from a single coordinating brain region in mice could mediate diverse features of anxiety. Integrating behavioural assays, in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology, respiratory physiology and optogenetics, we identify a surprising new role for the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in the coordinated modulation of diverse anxiety features. First, two BNST subregions were unexpectedly found to exert opposite effects on the anxious state: oval BNST activity promoted several independent anxious state features, whereas anterodorsal BNST-associated activity exerted anxiolytic influence for the same features. Notably, we found that three distinct anterodorsal BNST efferent projections-to the lateral hypothalamus, parabrachial nucleus and ventral tegmental area-each implemented an independent feature of anxiolysis: reduced risk-avoidance, reduced respiratory rate, and increased positive valence, respectively. Furthermore, selective inhibition of corresponding circuit elements in freely moving mice showed opposing behavioural effects compared with excitation, and in vivo recordings during free behaviour showed native spiking patterns in anterodorsal BNST neurons that differentiated safe and anxiogenic environments. These results demonstrate that distinct BNST subregions exert opposite effects in modulating anxiety, establish separable anxiolytic roles for different anterodorsal BNST projections, and illustrate circuit mechanisms underlying selection of features for the assembly of the anxious state.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kim, Sung-Yon -- Adhikari, Avishek -- Lee, Soo Yeun -- Marshel, James H -- Kim, Christina K -- Mallory, Caitlin S -- Lo, Maisie -- Pak, Sally -- Mattis, Joanna -- Lim, Byung Kook -- Malenka, Robert C -- Warden, Melissa R -- Neve, Rachael -- Tye, Kay M -- Deisseroth, Karl -- F32 MH088010/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 MH020002/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Apr 11;496(7444):219-23. doi: 10.1038/nature12018. Epub 2013 Mar 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23515158" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Action Potentials ; Animals ; Anxiety/pathology/*physiopathology ; Electrophysiology ; Mice ; Neural Pathways/*physiology ; Optogenetics ; Septal Nuclei/anatomy & histology/cytology/*physiopathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-01-17
    Description: The amygdala has long been associated with emotion and motivation, playing an essential part in processing both fearful and rewarding environmental stimuli. How can a single structure be crucial for such different functions? With recent technological advances that allow for causal investigations of specific neural circuit elements, we can now begin to map the complex anatomical connections of the amygdala onto behavioural function. Understanding how the amygdala contributes to a wide array of behaviours requires the study of distinct amygdala circuits.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4565157/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4565157/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Janak, Patricia H -- Tye, Kay M -- AA014925/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- AA17072/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- DA015096/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- DP2 DK102256/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- MH102441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- P50 AA017072/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AA014925/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AA016835/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA015096/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH102441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jan 15;517(7534):284-92. doi: 10.1038/nature14188.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. [2] Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25592533" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/*cytology/*physiology ; Animals ; Behavior/*physiology ; Biological Evolution ; Fear ; Humans ; Memory/physiology ; Neural Pathways/*physiology ; Reward
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-03-11
    Description: Anxiety--a sustained state of heightened apprehension in the absence of immediate threat--becomes severely debilitating in disease states. Anxiety disorders represent the most common of psychiatric diseases (28% lifetime prevalence) and contribute to the aetiology of major depression and substance abuse. Although it has been proposed that the amygdala, a brain region important for emotional processing, has a role in anxiety, the neural mechanisms that control anxiety remain unclear. Here we explore the neural circuits underlying anxiety-related behaviours by using optogenetics with two-photon microscopy, anxiety assays in freely moving mice, and electrophysiology. With the capability of optogenetics to control not only cell types but also specific connections between cells, we observed that temporally precise optogenetic stimulation of basolateral amygdala (BLA) terminals in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA)--achieved by viral transduction of the BLA with a codon-optimized channelrhodopsin followed by restricted illumination in the downstream CeA--exerted an acute, reversible anxiolytic effect. Conversely, selective optogenetic inhibition of the same projection with a third-generation halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) increased anxiety-related behaviours. Importantly, these effects were not observed with direct optogenetic control of BLA somata, possibly owing to recruitment of antagonistic downstream structures. Together, these results implicate specific BLA-CeA projections as critical circuit elements for acute anxiety control in the mammalian brain, and demonstrate the importance of optogenetically targeting defined projections, beyond simply targeting cell types, in the study of circuit function relevant to neuropsychiatric disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3154022/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3154022/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tye, Kay M -- Prakash, Rohit -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Fenno, Lief E -- Grosenick, Logan -- Zarabi, Hosniya -- Thompson, Kimberly R -- Gradinaru, Viviana -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Deisseroth, Karl -- 1F32MH088010-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- DP1 OD000616/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP1 OD000616-01/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA020794/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA020794-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH075957/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH075957-01A2/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 17;471(7338):358-62. doi: 10.1038/nature09820. Epub 2011 Mar 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21389985" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/cytology/*physiology/radiation effects ; Animals ; Anxiety/*physiopathology ; Anxiety Disorders/physiopathology ; Halorhodopsins/metabolism ; Light ; Mice ; Models, Neurological ; Neural Pathways/physiology/radiation effects ; Neurons/physiology/radiation effects ; Stress, Physiological/physiology ; Synapses/physiology/radiation effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-10-16
    Description: Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons have important roles in adaptive and pathological brain functions related to reward and motivation. However, it is unknown whether subpopulations of VTA dopamine neurons participate in distinct circuits that encode different motivational signatures, and whether inputs to the VTA differentially modulate such circuits. Here we show that, because of differences in synaptic connectivity, activation of inputs to the VTA from the laterodorsal tegmentum and the lateral habenula elicit reward and aversion in mice, respectively. Laterodorsal tegmentum neurons preferentially synapse on dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens lateral shell, whereas lateral habenula neurons synapse primarily on dopamine neurons projecting to the medial prefrontal cortex as well as on GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric-acid-containing) neurons in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus. These results establish that distinct VTA circuits generate reward and aversion, and thereby provide a new framework for understanding the circuit basis of adaptive and pathological motivated behaviours.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493743/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493743/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lammel, Stephan -- Lim, Byung Kook -- Ran, Chen -- Huang, Kee Wui -- Betley, Michael J -- Tye, Kay M -- Deisseroth, Karl -- Malenka, Robert C -- NS069375/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P50 MH086403/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 8;491(7423):212-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11527. Epub 2012 Oct 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Nancy Pritzker Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 265 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23064228" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Avoidance Learning/drug effects/*physiology ; Axons/metabolism ; Dopamine/metabolism ; Dopamine Antagonists/pharmacology ; Dopaminergic Neurons/metabolism ; GABAergic Neurons/metabolism ; Habenula/cytology/physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Neurological ; Neural Pathways/*physiology ; Receptors, Dopamine/metabolism ; *Reward ; Synapses/metabolism ; Ventral Tegmental Area/cytology/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-12-14
    Description: Major depression is characterized by diverse debilitating symptoms that include hopelessness and anhedonia. Dopamine neurons involved in reward and motivation are among many neural populations that have been hypothesized to be relevant, and certain antidepressant treatments, including medications and brain stimulation therapies, can influence the complex dopamine system. Until now it has not been possible to test this hypothesis directly, even in animal models, as existing therapeutic interventions are unable to specifically target dopamine neurons. Here we investigated directly the causal contributions of defined dopamine neurons to multidimensional depression-like phenotypes induced by chronic mild stress, by integrating behavioural, pharmacological, optogenetic and electrophysiological methods in freely moving rodents. We found that bidirectional control (inhibition or excitation) of specified midbrain dopamine neurons immediately and bidirectionally modulates (induces or relieves) multiple independent depression symptoms caused by chronic stress. By probing the circuit implementation of these effects, we observed that optogenetic recruitment of these dopamine neurons potently alters the neural encoding of depression-related behaviours in the downstream nucleus accumbens of freely moving rodents, suggesting that processes affecting depression symptoms may involve alterations in the neural encoding of action in limbic circuitry.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4160519/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4160519/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tye, Kay M -- Mirzabekov, Julie J -- Warden, Melissa R -- Ferenczi, Emily A -- Tsai, Hsing-Chen -- Finkelstein, Joel -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Adhikari, Avishek -- Thompson, Kimberly R -- Andalman, Aaron S -- Gunaydin, Lisa A -- Witten, Ilana B -- Deisseroth, Karl -- DP2 DA035149/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F32 MH880102/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 24;493(7433):537-41. doi: 10.1038/nature11740. Epub 2012 Dec 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. kaytye@mit.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235822" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Depression/chemically induced/*physiopathology ; Dopamine/metabolism ; Dopaminergic Neurons/drug effects/*metabolism/radiation effects ; Female ; Male ; Mice ; Models, Neurological ; Nucleus Accumbens/metabolism ; Optogenetics ; Phenotype ; Rats ; Rats, Long-Evans ; Stress, Psychological/physiopathology ; Time Factors ; Ventral Tegmental Area/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-04-03
    Description: Aggressive breast cancer is difficult to treat as it is unresponsive to many hormone-based therapies; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel, targetable regulators of progression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are important regulators in breast cancer and have great potential as therapeutic targets; however, little is known about how the majority of lncRNAs function within breast cancer. This study characterizes a novel lncRNA, MANCR (mitotically-associated long noncoding RNA; LINC00704), which is upregulated in breast cancer patient specimens and cells. Depletion of MANCR in triple-negative breast cancer cells significantly decreases cell proliferation and viability, with concomitant increases in DNA damage. Transcriptome analysis, based on RNA sequencing, following MANCR knockdown reveals significant differences in the expression of 〉2,000 transcripts, and gene set enrichment analysis identifies changes in multiple categories related to cell-cycle regulation. Furthermore, MANCR expression is highest in mitotic cells by both RT-qPCR and RNA in situ hybridization. Consistent with a role in cell-cycle regulation, MANCR-depleted cells have a lower mitotic index and higher incidences of defective cytokinesis and cell death. Taken together, these data reveal a role for the novel lncRNA, MANCR, in genomic stability of aggressive breast cancer, and identify it as a potential therapeutic target. Implications: The novel lncRNA, MANCR (LINC00704), is upregulated in breast cancer and is functionally linked with cell proliferation, viability, and genomic stability. Mol Cancer Res; 16(4); 587–98. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1541-7786
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3125
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-05-01
    Description: The ability to differentiate stimuli predicting positive or negative outcomes is critical for survival, and perturbations of emotional processing underlie many psychiatric disease states. Synaptic plasticity in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) mediates the acquisition of associative memories, both positive and negative. Different populations of BLA neurons may encode fearful or rewarding associations, but the identifying features of these populations and the synaptic mechanisms of differentiating positive and negative emotional valence have remained unknown. Here we show that BLA neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens (NAc projectors) or the centromedial amygdala (CeM projectors) undergo opposing synaptic changes following fear or reward conditioning. We find that photostimulation of NAc projectors supports positive reinforcement while photostimulation of CeM projectors mediates negative reinforcement. Photoinhibition of CeM projectors impairs fear conditioning and enhances reward conditioning. We characterize these functionally distinct neuronal populations by comparing their electrophysiological, morphological and genetic features. Overall, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the representation of positive and negative associations within the amygdala.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418228/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418228/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Namburi, Praneeth -- Beyeler, Anna -- Yorozu, Suzuko -- Calhoon, Gwendolyn G -- Halbert, Sarah A -- Wichmann, Romy -- Holden, Stephanie S -- Mertens, Kim L -- Anahtar, Melodi -- Felix-Ortiz, Ada C -- Wickersham, Ian R -- Gray, Jesse M -- Tye, Kay M -- DP2 DK102256/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DP2-DK-102256-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH101528/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH102441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01-MH101528-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01-MH102441-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH106018/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01-MH106018/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01-NS090473/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 30;520(7549):675-8. doi: 10.1038/nature14366.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Neuroscience Graduate Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, NRB 356, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02481, USA. ; 1] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA [2] Master's Program in Biomedical Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1098 XH, The Netherlands. ; McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25925480" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/*cytology/*physiology ; Animals ; Conditioning, Classical ; Fear/*physiology/psychology ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Long-Term Potentiation ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Motivation ; *Neural Pathways ; Neurons/*physiology ; Nucleus Accumbens/cytology/physiology/radiation effects ; Reinforcement (Psychology) ; *Reward ; Transcription, Genetic
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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