Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-08-13
    Description: Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3516815/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3516815/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Xueling -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Zhu, Jiang -- Zhang, Baoshan -- Georgiev, Ivelin -- Wang, Charlene -- Chen, Xuejun -- Longo, Nancy S -- Louder, Mark -- McKee, Krisha -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Perfetto, Stephen -- Schmidt, Stephen D -- Shi, Wei -- Wu, Lan -- Yang, Yongping -- Yang, Zhi-Yong -- Yang, Zhongjia -- Zhang, Zhenhai -- Bonsignori, Mattia -- Crump, John A -- Kapiga, Saidi H -- Sam, Noel E -- Haynes, Barton F -- Simek, Melissa -- Burton, Dennis R -- Koff, Wayne C -- Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Connors, Mark -- NISC Comparative Sequencing Program -- Mullikin, James C -- Nabel, Gary J -- Roederer, Mario -- Shapiro, Lawrence -- Kwong, Peter D -- Mascola, John R -- 5U19 AI 067854-06/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI033292/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI067854/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Sep 16;333(6049):1593-602. doi: 10.1126/science.1207532. Epub 2011 Aug 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21835983" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: AIDS Vaccines ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibody Affinity ; Antibody Specificity ; Antigens, CD4/metabolism ; Base Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Binding Sites, Antibody ; Complementarity Determining Regions/genetics ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Epitopes ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Genes, Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain ; HIV Antibodies/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; HIV Envelope Protein gp120/chemistry/*immunology/metabolism ; HIV Infections/immunology ; HIV-1/chemistry/*immunology ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/chemistry/immunology ; Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/chemistry/immunology ; Immunoglobulin J-Chains/genetics ; Immunoglobulin Light Chains/chemistry/immunology ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation ; Sequence Analysis, DNA
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-05-14
    Description: The HIV-1 fusion peptide, comprising 15 to 20 hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the Env-gp41 subunit, is a critical component of the virus-cell entry machinery. Here, we report the identification of a neutralizing antibody, N123-VRC34.01, which targets the fusion peptide and blocks viral entry by inhibiting conformational changes in gp120 and gp41 subunits of Env required for entry. Crystal structures of N123-VRC34.01 liganded to the fusion peptide, and to the full Env trimer, revealed an epitope consisting of the N-terminal eight residues of the gp41 fusion peptide and glycan N88 of gp120, and molecular dynamics showed that the N-terminal portion of the fusion peptide can be solvent-exposed. These results reveal the fusion peptide to be a neutralizing antibody epitope and thus a target for vaccine design.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kong, Rui -- Xu, Kai -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Acharya, Priyamvada -- Lemmin, Thomas -- Liu, Kevin -- Ozorowski, Gabriel -- Soto, Cinque -- Taft, Justin D -- Bailer, Robert T -- Cale, Evan M -- Chen, Lei -- Choi, Chang W -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Gorman, Jason -- Huang, Jinghe -- Joyce, M Gordon -- Louder, Mark K -- Ma, Xiaochu -- McKee, Krisha -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Pancera, Marie -- Yang, Yongping -- Blanchard, Scott C -- Mothes, Walther -- Burton, Dennis R -- Koff, Wayne C -- Connors, Mark -- Ward, Andrew B -- Kwong, Peter D -- Mascola, John R -- P01GM56550/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM079238/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM116654/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 May 13;352(6287):828-33. doi: 10.1126/science.aae0474.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ; Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; HIV-Specific Immunity Section, Laboratory of Immunoregulation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06536, USA. ; Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA. ; Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Boston, MA 02142, USA. ; International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, New York, NY 10038, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. pdkwong@nih.gov jmascola@nih.gov.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174988" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395007/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395007/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Schramm, Chaim A -- Gorman, Jason -- Moore, Penny L -- Bhiman, Jinal N -- DeKosky, Brandon J -- Ernandes, Michael J -- Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Kim, Helen J -- Pancera, Marie -- Staupe, Ryan P -- Altae-Tran, Han R -- Bailer, Robert T -- Crooks, Ema T -- Cupo, Albert -- Druz, Aliaksandr -- Garrett, Nigel J -- Hoi, Kam H -- Kong, Rui -- Louder, Mark K -- Longo, Nancy S -- McKee, Krisha -- Nonyane, Molati -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Roark, Ryan S -- Rudicell, Rebecca S -- Schmidt, Stephen D -- Sheward, Daniel J -- Soto, Cinque -- Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt -- Yang, Yongping -- Zhang, Zhenhai -- NISC Comparative Sequencing Program -- Mullikin, James C -- Binley, James M -- Sanders, Rogier W -- Wilson, Ian A -- Moore, John P -- Ward, Andrew B -- Georgiou, George -- Williamson, Carolyn -- Abdool Karim, Salim S -- Morris, Lynn -- Kwong, Peter D -- Shapiro, Lawrence -- Mascola, John R -- P01 AI082362/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI100790/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):55-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13036. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA [2]. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa [3] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [4]. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa. ; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Torrey Pines Institute, San Diego, California 92037, USA. ; Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. ; Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa. ; Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Division of Medical Virology, University of Cape Town and NHLS, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. ; Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] NISC Comparative Sequencing program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2] NIH Intramural Sequencing Center, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Department of Medical Microbiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [4] Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA [2] Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA [3] Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA. ; 1] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [2] Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Division of Medical Virology, University of Cape Town and NHLS, Cape Town 7701, South Africa. ; 1] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa [2] Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Center for HIV and STIs, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, 2131, South Africa [2] Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2050, South Africa [3] Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, 4013, South Africa. ; 1] Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2] Department of Biochemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590074" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: AIDS Vaccines/chemistry/immunology ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibody Affinity/genetics/immunology ; Antigens, CD4/immunology/metabolism ; B-Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology/metabolism ; Binding Sites/immunology ; Cell Lineage ; Complementarity Determining Regions/chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Epitope Mapping ; Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry/immunology ; Evolution, Molecular ; HIV Antibodies/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/isolation & purification ; HIV Envelope Protein gp160/*chemistry/*immunology ; HIV Infections/immunology ; HIV-1/chemistry/immunology ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Neutralization Tests ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-05-11
    Description: Serum characterization and antibody isolation are transforming our understanding of the humoral immune response to viral infection. Here, we show that epitope specificities of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies in serum can be elucidated from the serum pattern of neutralization against a diverse panel of HIV-1 isolates. We determined "neutralization fingerprints" for 30 neutralizing antibodies on a panel of 34 diverse HIV-1 strains and showed that similarity in neutralization fingerprint correlated with similarity in epitope. We used these fingerprints to delineate specificities of polyclonal sera from 24 HIV-1-infected donors and a chimeric siman-human immunodeficiency virus-infected macaque. Delineated specificities matched published specificities and were further confirmed by antibody isolation for two sera. Patterns of virus-isolate neutralization can thus afford a detailed epitope-specific understanding of neutralizing-antibody responses to viral infection.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Georgiev, Ivelin S -- Doria-Rose, Nicole A -- Zhou, Tongqing -- Kwon, Young Do -- Staupe, Ryan P -- Moquin, Stephanie -- Chuang, Gwo-Yu -- Louder, Mark K -- Schmidt, Stephen D -- Altae-Tran, Han R -- Bailer, Robert T -- McKee, Krisha -- Nason, Martha -- O'Dell, Sijy -- Ofek, Gilad -- Pancera, Marie -- Srivatsan, Sanjay -- Shapiro, Lawrence -- Connors, Mark -- Migueles, Stephen A -- Morris, Lynn -- Nishimura, Yoshiaki -- Martin, Malcolm A -- Mascola, John R -- Kwong, Peter D -- U19 AI51794/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 10;340(6133):751-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1233989.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23661761" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood/*immunology ; Epitope Mapping ; HIV Antibodies/blood/*immunology ; HIV Infections/blood/*immunology ; HIV-1/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Humans ; Immunodominant Epitopes/chemistry/immunology ; Macaca ; Neutralization Tests ; Protein Conformation ; Serum/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1573-7357
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Abstract The superconducting transition temperatures have been measured for the tetragonal I phase of Na0.23WO3, the hexagonal phase of K0.33 WO3, and the hexagonal phase of Rb0.33WO3 for pressures up to 20,000 bar. The slope of the curves is + 1.7 × 10−5 K/bar for the sodium bronze, −5.8 × 10−5 K /bar for the potassium bronze, and −1.5 × 10−5 K/bar for the rubidium bronze. A sharp change in slope of the transition temperature vs. pressure curve for the potassium bronze at 4000 bar may indicate a phase change.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    s.l. : American Chemical Society
    Analytical chemistry 33 (1961), S. 589-592 
    ISSN: 1520-6882
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Freshwater marsh community ; Saltwater intrusion ; Post-dieback recovery ; Species composition ; Soil characteristics
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Greenhouse mesocosms of freshwater marsh vegetation were exposed to a simulated saltwater intrusion event followed by a recovery period during which water levels and interstitial water salinity were adjusted over a range of conditions. Virtually all above-ground vegetation, including the three dominant species, Sagittaria lancifolia L., Leersia oryzoides (L.) Swartz, and Panicum hemitomon Schultes, was killed by the initial saltwater intrusion event. P. hemitomon did not recover, but S. lancifolia and L. oryzoides, as well as many of the other species initially present, exhibited some ability to recover depending on post-saltwater intrusion conditions. Increasingly harsh recovery conditions (for freshwater marsh vegetation), including more reduced soil conditions, higher interstitial salinities, and higher interstitial sulfide concentrations were associated with decreased live above-ground biomass and species richness. The effect of elevated salinity on vegetative recovery became more pronounced under flooded conditions. This experiment illustrates that the response of a freshwater marsh community to the long-term disturbance effect of a transient saltwater intrusion event will be strongly influenced by post-intrusion salinity and water levels.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-1831
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1420-908X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Eosinophil Major Basic Protein (MBP) may be a potent effector in damaging airway epithelium and inducing acute (2–3 h) hyperresponsiveness to agonists in primates. Accordingly, interactions between human eosinophil MBP and guinea-pig airway epithelium were quantitated biochemically. MBP was extracted from human eosinophils and purified by size-exclusion HPLC. This resulted in a single protein band on electrophoresis, which cross-reacted with antisera raised to peptides derived from the predicted sequence of human MBP. This human MBP caused modest, but statistically significant, damage to respiratory epithelium (16.4% increase in efflux of51Cr from guinea-pig tracheal rings) after 3 h of incubation with 10−4 M concentration, but not with lower concentrations. These data demonstrates that MBP cytotoxicity to intact epithelium can be rapidly measuredin vitro, and suggests that rodent airway epithelium may be relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of MBP.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    ISSN: 1365-2133
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The two-Stage leukocyte migration agarose test (indirect LMAT), shown to be a sensitive in vitro assay for cell-mediated immunity, was used to study Kveim reactivity in vitro in patients with sarcoidosis. No Kveim-induced inhibition of leukocyte migration in agarose or Kveim-induced lymphocyte transformation in vitro was found in 23 patients with sarcoidosis, suggesting that the Kveim reaction is not an expression of cell-mediated immunity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...