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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-10-10
    Description: Leucine is a proteogenic amino acid that also regulates many aspects of mammalian physiology, in large part by activating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase, a master growth controller. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 through the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Several factors regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, aGTPase-activating protein; GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown function; and Sestrin2, a GATOR2-interacting protein that inhibits mTORC1 signaling. We find that leucine, but not arginine, disrupts the Sestrin2-GATOR2 interaction by binding to Sestrin2 with a dissociation constant of 20 micromolar, which is the leucine concentration that half-maximally activates mTORC1. The leucine-binding capacity of Sestrin2 is required for leucine to activate mTORC1 in cells. These results indicate that Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698017/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698017/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wolfson, Rachel L -- Chantranupong, Lynne -- Saxton, Robert A -- Shen, Kuang -- Scaria, Sonia M -- Cantor, Jason R -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30 CA189333/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA180271/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 1;351(6268):43-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aab2674. Epub 2015 Oct 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. sabatini@wi.mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26449471" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: GTPase-Activating Proteins/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Leucine/*metabolism ; Metabolic Networks and Pathways ; Multiprotein Complexes/*metabolism ; Nuclear Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-12-14
    Description: Approximately one-third of the proteome is initially destined for the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum or the bacterial plasma membrane. The proper localization of these proteins is mediated by a universally conserved protein-targeting machinery, the signal recognition particle (SRP), which recognizes ribosomes carrying signal sequences and, through interactions with the SRP receptor, delivers them to the protein-translocation machinery on the target membrane. The SRP is an ancient ribonucleoprotein particle containing an essential, elongated SRP RNA for which precise functions have remained elusive. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to show that the Escherichia coli SRP-SRP receptor GTPase complex, after initial assembly at the tetraloop end of SRP RNA, travels over 100 A to the distal end of this RNA, where rapid GTP hydrolysis occurs. This movement is negatively regulated by the translating ribosome and, at a later stage, positively regulated by the SecYEG translocon, providing an attractive mechanism for ensuring the productive exchange of the targeting and translocation machineries at the ribosome exit site with high spatial and temporal accuracy. Our results show that large RNAs can act as molecular scaffolds that enable the easy exchange of distinct factors and precise timing of molecular events in a complex cellular process; this concept may be extended to similar phenomena in other ribonucleoprotein complexes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3531814/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3531814/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shen, Kuang -- Arslan, Sinan -- Akopian, David -- Ha, Taekjip -- Shan, Shu-ou -- GM065367/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM078024/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM45162/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM065367/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM078024/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R37 GM045162/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 13;492(7428):271-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11726.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235881" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Enzyme Activation ; Escherichia coli/enzymology/genetics/*metabolism ; Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer ; GTP Phosphohydrolases/*metabolism ; Microscopy, Fluorescence ; Protein Biosynthesis/*physiology ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Transport ; RNA, Bacterial/*metabolism ; Signal Recognition Particle/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-02-19
    Description: Cotranslational targeting of membrane and secretory proteins is mediated by the universally conserved signal recognition particle (SRP). Together with its receptor (SR), SRP mediates the guanine triphosphate (GTP)-dependent delivery of translating ribosomes bearing signal sequences to translocons on the target membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the SRP:SR complex at 3.9 angstrom resolution and biochemical data revealing that the activated SRP:SR guanine triphosphatase (GTPase) complex binds the distal end of the SRP hairpin RNA where GTP hydrolysis is stimulated. Combined with previous findings, these results suggest that the SRP:SR GTPase complex initially assembles at the tetraloop end of the SRP RNA and then relocalizes to the opposite end of the RNA. This rearrangement provides a mechanism for coupling GTP hydrolysis to the handover of cargo to the translocon.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3758919/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3758919/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ataide, Sandro F -- Schmitz, Nikolaus -- Shen, Kuang -- Ke, Ailong -- Shan, Shu-ou -- Doudna, Jennifer A -- Ban, Nenad -- GM078024/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM078024/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM086766/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Feb 18;331(6019):881-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1196473.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule Zurich (ETH Zurich), Zurich, Switzerland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21330537" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Base Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Crystallization ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Enzyme Activation ; Escherichia coli/chemistry/metabolism ; Escherichia coli Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; GTP Phosphohydrolases/chemistry/metabolism ; Guanosine Triphosphate/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Models, Biological ; Models, Molecular ; Nucleic Acid Conformation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Transport ; RNA, Bacterial/*chemistry/metabolism ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/*chemistry/metabolism ; Ribosomal Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Ribosomes/metabolism ; Signal Recognition Particle/*chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2010-12-18
    Description: We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of 'culturomics,' focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3279742/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3279742/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Michel, Jean-Baptiste -- Shen, Yuan Kui -- Aiden, Aviva Presser -- Veres, Adrian -- Gray, Matthew K -- Google Books Team -- Pickett, Joseph P -- Hoiberg, Dale -- Clancy, Dan -- Norvig, Peter -- Orwant, Jon -- Pinker, Steven -- Nowak, Martin A -- Aiden, Erez Lieberman -- HD 18381/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM078986/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM078986-04/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM078986/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 HG002295/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):176-82. doi: 10.1126/science.1199644. Epub 2010 Dec 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. jb.michel@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21163965" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Algorithms ; *Books ; Cultural Evolution ; *Culture ; Data Collection ; Dictionaries as Topic ; Encyclopedias as Topic ; Famous Persons ; *Humanities ; *Linguistics ; *Literature ; *Social Sciences ; Technology ; *Vocabulary
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2018-12-20
    Description: Infectious disease vaccines Infectious disease vaccines, Published online: 19 December 2018; doi:10.1038/d41573-018-00011-6 Infectious disease vaccines
    Print ISSN: 1474-1776
    Electronic ISSN: 1474-1784
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-01-09
    Description: The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase is a master growth regulator that responds to multiple environmental cues. Amino acids stimulate, in a Rag-, Ragulator-, and vacuolar adenosine triphosphatase-dependent fashion, the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, where it interacts with its activator Rheb. Here, we identify SLC38A9, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to amino acid transporters, as a lysosomal transmembrane protein that interacts with the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and Ragulator in an amino acid-sensitive fashion. SLC38A9 transports arginine with a high Michaelis constant, and loss of SLC38A9 represses mTORC1 activation by amino acids, particularly arginine. Overexpression of SLC38A9 or just its Ragulator-binding domain makes mTORC1 signaling insensitive to amino acid starvation but not to Rag activity. Thus, SLC38A9 functions upstream of the Rag GTPases and is an excellent candidate for being an arginine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295826/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295826/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Shuyu -- Tsun, Zhi-Yang -- Wolfson, Rachel L -- Shen, Kuang -- Wyant, Gregory A -- Plovanich, Molly E -- Yuan, Elizabeth D -- Jones, Tony D -- Chantranupong, Lynne -- Comb, William -- Wang, Tim -- Bar-Peled, Liron -- Zoncu, Roberto -- Straub, Christoph -- Kim, Choah -- Park, Jiwon -- Sabatini, Bernardo L -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30 CA180754/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 AG044064/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA180271/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007287/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 9;347(6218):188-94. doi: 10.1126/science.1257132. Epub 2015 Jan 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. sabatini@wi.mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25567906" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Amino Acid Transport Systems/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Arginine/deficiency/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Lysosomes/*enzymology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins/*metabolism ; Multiprotein Complexes/*metabolism ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Signal Transduction ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-12-19
    Description: Endogenous biomarkers can be clinically relevant tools for the assessment of transporter function in vivo and corresponding drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to perform systematic evaluation of plasma data obtained for 20 endogenous molecules in the same healthy subjects ( n = 8–12) in the absence and presence of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) inhibitor rifampicin (600 mg, single dose). The extent of rifampicin DDI magnitude [the ratio of the plasma concentration-time area under the curve (AUCR)], estimated fraction transported (f T ), and baseline variability was compared across the biomarkers and relative to rosuvastatin and coproporphyrin I (CPI). Out of the 20 biomarkers investigated tetradecanedioate (TDA), hexadecanedioate (HDA), glycocholic acid, glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), and coproporphyrin III (CPIII) showed the high AUCR (2.1–8.5) and f T (0.5–0.76) values, indicative of substantial OATP1B-mediated transport. A significant positive correlation was observed between the individual GDCA and TDCA AUCRs and the magnitude of rosuvastatin-rifampicin interaction. The CPI and CPIII AUCRs were significantly correlated, but no clear trend was established with the rosuvastatin AUCR. Moderate interindividual variability (15%–62%) in baseline exposure and AUCR was observed for TDA, HDA, and CPIII. In contrast, bile acids demonstrated high interindividual variability (69%–113%) and significant decreases in baseline plasma concentrations during the first 4 hours. This comprehensive analysis in the same individuals confirms that none of the biomarkers supersede CPI in the evaluation of OATP1B-mediated DDI risk. Monitoring of CPI and GDCA/TDCA may be beneficial for dual OATP1B/sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide inhibitors with consideration of challenges associated with large inter- and intraindividual variability observed for bile acids. Benefit of monitoring combined biomarkers (CPI, one bile acid and one fatty acid) needs to be confirmed with larger data sets and against multiple OATP1B clinical probes and perpetrators.
    Print ISSN: 0022-3565
    Electronic ISSN: 1521-0103
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1572-9605
    Keywords: Critical current density ; coherence length ; penetration depth ; lower critical field H c2
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Physics
    Notes: Abstract The influence of Sn doping on superconductivity in the Bi-based 2212 phase is studied in this paper. For the samples R–T relations and magnetic hysteresis loops were measured. X-ray powder diffraction analysis was also performed. For Bi1.75Pb0.25Sr2CaCu2.3−x Sn x O y , the experimental results show that by adding the proper amount of Sn the superconductivity of the samples can be improved. As x = 0.15, the critical temperature T c, the critical current density J c, and the magnetic pinning force density F reach a maximum. At T = 11 K, the critical state parameters H c1, H c2, κ, λ, and ξ are calculated and compared with the results reported by other researchers. The experimental results also show that the Sn doping is able to speed up the growth of the 2223 phase. In brief, Sn doping is an effective way of improving the superconductivity in Bi-based superconductors.
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1572-9605
    Keywords: Crystal growth ; morphology ; YBCO ; terraced crystals ; step growth
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Physics
    Notes: Abstract The crystal growth and crystal morphology are very important properties of YBa2Cu3O y superconductors. In this work, we approach these problems with polycrystals. Several typical crystal morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the terraced crystals with a layer-by-layer structure were found to be the major form for the well-grown YBa2Cu3O y . To interpret the results, a step-growth model was proposed. In this model, each crystal terrace is close-packed with crystal particles in order. And the particles, each consisting of tens of crystal cells, are movable during crystal growth. Particles at edges or margins of small crystals can move to their larger neighboring crystals through diffusion. With this particle diffusion, small crystals vanish and large crystals grow larger. This proposed model is confirmed by experimental observations.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1077-3118
    Source: AIP Digital Archive
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: A technique to characterize oxide charge detrapping in a Fowler–Nordheim stressed n-metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor is proposed. This technique consists of two alternating phases, an oxide charge detrapping phase and a subthreshold current measurement phase. An analytical model relating a subthreshold current transient to oxide charge density and detrapping time constants was derived. By varying the gate bias in the detrapping phase and the ambient temperature, the field and temperature dependences of oxide charge detrapping can be obtained from the subthreshold current transients measured. © 1997 American Institute of Physics.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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