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  • 1
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; LUNG ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; METABOLISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; AGE ; DNA-REPAIR ; smoking ; ADHESION ; CELL-ADHESION ; inflammation ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; CANDIDATE GENES ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; INCREASED RISK ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; CHINESE POPULATION ; XUAN-WEI ; METHYLENE-TETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; GENE POLYMORPHISMS ; Genetic ; CENTRAL-EUROPE ; SEQUENCE VARIANTS
    Abstract: Background. Analysis of candidate genes in individual studies has had only limited success in identifying particular gene variants that are conclusively associated with lung cancer risk. In the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), we conducted a coordinated genotyping study of 10 common variants selected because of their prior evidence of an association with lung cancer. These variants belonged to candidate genes from different cancer-related pathways including inflammation (IL1B), folate metabolism (MTHFR), regulatory function (AKAP9 and CAMKK1), cell adhesion (SEZL6) and apoptosis (FAS, FASL, TP53, TP53BP1 and BAT3). Methods. Genotype data from 15 ILCCO case-control studies were available for a total of 8431 lung cancer cases and 11 072 controls of European descent and Asian ethnic groups. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the association between each variant and lung cancer risk. Results. Only the association between a non-synonymous variant of TP53BP1 (rs560191) and lung cancer risk was significant (OR = 0.91, P = 0.002). This association was more striking for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.86, P = 6 x 10(-4)). No heterogeneity by center, ethnicity, smoking status, age group or sex was observed. In order to confirm this association, we included results for this variant from a set of independent studies (9966 cases/11 722 controls) and we reported similar results. When combining all these studies together, we reported an overall OR = 0.93 (0.89-0.97) (P = 0.001). This association was significant only for squamous cell carcinoma [OR = 0.89 (0.85-0.95), P = 1 x 10(-4)]. Conclusion. This study suggests that rs560191 is associated to lung cancer risk and further highlights the value of consortia in replicating or refuting published genetic associations
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20106900
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-10-19
    Description: Nuclear-architecture defects have been shown to correlate with the manifestation of a number of human diseases as well as ageing. It is therefore plausible that diseases whose manifestations correlate with ageing might be connected to the appearance of nuclear aberrations over time. We decided to evaluate nuclear organization in the context of ageing-associated disorders by focusing on a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) dominant mutation (G2019S; glycine-to-serine substitution at amino acid 2019), which is associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease as well as impairment of adult neurogenesis in mice. Here we report on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from Parkinson's disease patients and the implications of LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human neural-stem-cell (NSC) populations. Mutant NSCs showed increased susceptibility to proteasomal stress as well as passage-dependent deficiencies in nuclear-envelope organization, clonal expansion and neuronal differentiation. Disease phenotypes were rescued by targeted correction of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation with its wild-type counterpart in Parkinson's disease iPSCs and were recapitulated after targeted knock-in of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human embryonic stem cells. Analysis of human brain tissue showed nuclear-envelope impairment in clinically diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our results identify the nucleus as a previously unknown cellular organelle in Parkinson's disease pathology and may help to open new avenues for Parkinson's disease diagnoses as well as for the potential development of therapeutics targeting this fundamental cell structure.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Qu, Jing -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Nivet, Emmanuel -- Li, Mo -- Montserrat, Nuria -- Yi, Fei -- Xu, Xiuling -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Zhang, Weiqi -- Wagner, Ulrich -- Kim, Audrey -- Ren, Bing -- Li, Ying -- Goebl, April -- Kim, Jessica -- Soligalla, Rupa Devi -- Dubova, Ilir -- Thompson, James -- Yates, John 3rd -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GTB07001/Telethon/Italy -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 22;491(7425):603-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11557. Epub 2012 Oct 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075850" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Apoptosis ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Division ; Cell Line ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Knock-In Techniques ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/genetics/pathology ; Parkinson Disease/*pathology ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Stress, Physiological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-03-13
    Description: Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (〉90 degrees C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hsu, Hsiang-Wen -- Postberg, Frank -- Sekine, Yasuhito -- Shibuya, Takazo -- Kempf, Sascha -- Horanyi, Mihaly -- Juhasz, Antal -- Altobelli, Nicolas -- Suzuki, Katsuhiko -- Masaki, Yuka -- Kuwatani, Tatsu -- Tachibana, Shogo -- Sirono, Sin-iti -- Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg -- Srama, Ralf -- England -- Nature. 2015 Mar 12;519(7542):207-10. doi: 10.1038/nature14262.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA. ; 1] Institut fur Geowissenschaften, Universitat Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Institut fur Raumfahrtsysteme, Universitat Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany. ; Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Japan. ; Laboratory of Ocean-Earth Life Evolution Research, JAMSTEC, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan. ; 1] Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303, USA [2] Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner RCP, 1121 Budapest, Hungary. ; European Space Agency, ESAC, E-28691 Madrid, Spain. ; Research and Development Center for Submarine Resources, JAMSTEC, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan. ; Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan. ; Department of Natural History Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan. ; Graduate School of Environmental Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan. ; Institut fur Raumfahrtsysteme, Universitat Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25762281" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-04-13
    Description: Bhargavi Manda, Hina Mir, Ruchika Gangwar, Avtar S. Meena, Shrunali Amin, Pradeep K. Shukla, Kesha Dalal, Takuya Suzuki, and RadhaKrishna Rao The apical junctional complex (AJC), which includes tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs), determines the epithelial polarity, cell-cell adhesion and permeability barrier. An intriguing characteristic of a TJ is the dynamic nature of its multiprotein complex. Occludin is the most mobile TJ protein, but its significance in TJ dynamics is poorly understood. On the basis of phosphorylation sites, we distinguished a sequence in the C-terminal domain of occludin as a regulatory motif (ORM). Deletion of ORM and expression of a deletion mutant of occludin in renal and intestinal epithelia reduced the mobility of occludin at the TJs. ORM deletion attenuated Ca 2+ depletion, osmotic stress and hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of TJs, AJs and the cytoskeleton. The double point mutations T403A/T404A, but not T403D/T404D, in occludin mimicked the effects of ORM deletion on occludin mobility and AJC disruption by Ca 2+ depletion. Both Y398A/Y402A and Y398D/Y402D double point mutations partially blocked AJC disruption. Expression of a deletion mutant of occludin attenuated collective cell migration in the renal and intestinal epithelia. Overall, this study reveals the role of ORM and its phosphorylation in occludin mobility, AJC dynamics and epithelial cell migration.
    Print ISSN: 0021-9533
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-9137
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Published by Company of Biologists
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-02-25
    Description: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare and fatal human premature ageing disease, characterized by premature arteriosclerosis and degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). HGPS is caused by a single point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene, resulting in the generation of progerin, a truncated splicing mutant of lamin A. Accumulation of progerin leads to various ageing-associated nuclear defects including disorganization of nuclear lamina and loss of heterochromatin. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts obtained from patients with HGPS. HGPS-iPSCs show absence of progerin, and more importantly, lack the nuclear envelope and epigenetic alterations normally associated with premature ageing. Upon differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs, progerin and its ageing-associated phenotypic consequences are restored. Specifically, directed differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs to SMCs leads to the appearance of premature senescence phenotypes associated with vascular ageing. Additionally, our studies identify DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNAPKcs, also known as PRKDC) as a downstream target of progerin. The absence of nuclear DNAPK holoenzyme correlates with premature as well as physiological ageing. Because progerin also accumulates during physiological ageing, our results provide an in vitro iPSC-based model to study the pathogenesis of human premature and physiological vascular ageing.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088088/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088088/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Barkho, Basam Z -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Diep, Dinh -- Qu, Jing -- Yang, Sheng-Lian -- Panopoulos, Athanasia D -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Kurian, Leo -- Walsh, Christopher -- Thompson, James -- Boue, Stephanie -- Fung, Ho Lim -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Zhang, Kun -- Yates, John 3rd -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA025779/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA025779-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01-DA025779/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009370/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009370-25A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 14;472(7342):221-5. doi: 10.1038/nature09879. Epub 2011 Feb 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21346760" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/metabolism/pathology/physiology ; Aging, Premature/genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Calcium-Binding Proteins/analysis ; Cell Aging ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Line ; Cellular Reprogramming ; DNA-Activated Protein Kinase/metabolism ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Fibroblasts/pathology ; Holoenzymes/metabolism ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Lamin Type A ; Microfilament Proteins/analysis ; Models, Biological ; Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/pathology ; Nuclear Proteins/analysis/genetics/metabolism ; Phenotype ; Progeria/genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Protein Precursors/analysis/genetics/metabolism ; Substrate Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-01-22
    Description: In various cellular membrane systems, vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) function as proton pumps, which are involved in many processes such as bone resorption and cancer metastasis, and these membrane proteins represent attractive drug targets for osteoporosis and cancer. The hydrophilic V(1) portion is known as a rotary motor, in which a central axis DF complex rotates inside a hexagonally arranged catalytic A(3)B(3) complex using ATP hydrolysis energy, but the molecular mechanism is not well defined owing to a lack of high-resolution structural information. We previously reported on the in vitro expression, purification and reconstitution of Enterococcus hirae V(1)-ATPase from the A(3)B(3) and DF complexes. Here we report the asymmetric structures of the nucleotide-free (2.8 A) and nucleotide-bound (3.4 A) A(3)B(3) complex that demonstrate conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding, suggesting a binding order in the right-handed rotational orientation in a cooperative manner. The crystal structures of the nucleotide-free (2.2 A) and nucleotide-bound (2.7 A) V(1)-ATPase are also reported. The more tightly packed nucleotide-binding site seems to be induced by DF binding, and ATP hydrolysis seems to be stimulated by the approach of a conserved arginine residue. To our knowledge, these asymmetric structures represent the first high-resolution view of the rotational mechanism of V(1)-ATPase.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Arai, Satoshi -- Saijo, Shinya -- Suzuki, Kano -- Mizutani, Kenji -- Kakinuma, Yoshimi -- Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko -- Ohsawa, Noboru -- Terada, Takaho -- Shirouzu, Mikako -- Yokoyama, Shigeyuki -- Iwata, So -- Yamato, Ichiro -- Murata, Takeshi -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 31;493(7434):703-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11778. Epub 2013 Jan 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage, Chiba 263-8522, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23334411" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Crystallization ; Enterococcus/*enzymology/genetics ; *Models, Molecular ; Mutation ; Nucleotides/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein Subunits ; Rotation ; Vacuolar Proton-Translocating ATPases/*chemistry/genetics
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-05-31
    Description: Human language, as well as birdsong, relies on the ability to arrange vocal elements in new sequences. However, little is known about the ontogenetic origin of this capacity. Here we track the development of vocal combinatorial capacity in three species of vocal learners, combining an experimental approach in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with an analysis of natural development of vocal transitions in Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata domestica) and pre-lingual human infants. We find a common, stepwise pattern of acquiring vocal transitions across species. In our first study, juvenile zebra finches were trained to perform one song and then the training target was altered, prompting the birds to swap syllable order, or insert a new syllable into a string. All birds solved these permutation tasks in a series of steps, gradually approximating the target sequence by acquiring new pairwise syllable transitions, sometimes too slowly to accomplish the task fully. Similarly, in the more complex songs of Bengalese finches, branching points and bidirectional transitions in song syntax were acquired in a stepwise fashion, starting from a more restrictive set of vocal transitions. The babbling of pre-lingual human infants showed a similar pattern: instead of a single developmental shift from reduplicated to variegated babbling (that is, from repetitive to diverse sequences), we observed multiple shifts, where each new syllable type slowly acquired a diversity of pairwise transitions, asynchronously over development. Collectively, these results point to a common generative process that is conserved across species, suggesting that the long-noted gap between perceptual versus motor combinatorial capabilities in human infants may arise partly from the challenges in constructing new pairwise vocal transitions.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3676428/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3676428/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lipkind, Dina -- Marcus, Gary F -- Bemis, Douglas K -- Sasahara, Kazutoshi -- Jacoby, Nori -- Takahasi, Miki -- Suzuki, Kenta -- Feher, Olga -- Ravbar, Primoz -- Okanoya, Kazuo -- Tchernichovski, Ofer -- R01 DC004722/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 6;498(7452):104-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12173. Epub 2013 May 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10065, USA. dina.lipkind@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23719373" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Biological Evolution ; *Child Language ; Finches/*physiology ; Humans ; Infant ; Male ; Models, Biological ; Phonetics ; Speech/physiology ; Time Factors ; Vocalization, Animal/*physiology
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-05-07
    Description: Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Jun -- Okamura, Daiji -- Li, Mo -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Luo, Chongyuan -- Ma, Li -- He, Yupeng -- Li, Zhongwei -- Benner, Chris -- Tamura, Isao -- Krause, Marie N -- Nery, Joseph R -- Du, Tingting -- Zhang, Zhuzhu -- Hishida, Tomoaki -- Takahashi, Yuta -- Aizawa, Emi -- Kim, Na Young -- Lajara, Jeronimo -- Guillen, Pedro -- Campistol, Josep M -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Ross, Pablo J -- Saghatelian, Alan -- Ren, Bing -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 21;521(7552):316-21. doi: 10.1038/nature14413. Epub 2015 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Integrated Genomics, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA. ; 1] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Life Science Center, Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan. ; Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain. ; 1] Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain [2] Fundacion Pedro Guillen, Clinica Cemtro, Avenida Ventisquero de la Condesa, 42, 28035 Madrid, Spain. ; Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Carrer Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. ; University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Peptide Biology Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945737" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Culture Techniques/methods ; Cell Line ; *Chimera ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Germ Layers/cytology ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology ; Male ; Mice ; Pan troglodytes ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Regenerative Medicine ; Species Specificity
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-04-28
    Description: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is essential to maintain the symbiotic balance between gut bacterial communities and the host immune system. Here we provide evidence that the inhibitory co-receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) regulates the gut microbiota through appropriate selection of IgA plasma cell repertoires. PD-1 deficiency generates an excess number of T follicular helper (T(FH)) cells with altered phenotypes, which results in dysregulated selection of IgA precursor cells in the germinal center of Peyer's patches. Consequently, the IgAs produced in PD-1-deficient mice have reduced bacteria-binding capacity, which causes alterations of microbial communities in the gut. Thus, PD-1 plays a critical role in regulation of antibody diversification required for the maintenance of intact mucosal barrier.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kawamoto, Shimpei -- Tran, Thinh H -- Maruya, Mikako -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Doi, Yasuko -- Tsutsui, Yumi -- Kato, Lucia M -- Fagarasan, Sidonia -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Apr 27;336(6080):485-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1217718.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory for Mucosal Immunity, Research Center for Allergy and Immunology, RIKEN Yokohama, Tsurumi, Yokohama, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22539724" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adoptive Transfer ; Animals ; B-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; Bacteria/immunology ; Bacterial Load ; *Bacterial Physiological Phenomena ; Feces/microbiology ; Genes, Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain ; Germinal Center/cytology/immunology ; Immunoglobulin A/biosynthesis/*immunology ; Intestinal Mucosa/*immunology ; Intestine, Small/immunology/*microbiology ; Lymphocyte Count ; Mice ; Peyer's Patches/cytology/immunology ; Plasma Cells/immunology/physiology ; Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/genetics/*physiology ; Symbiosis ; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/*immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2015-05-02
    Description: Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1alpha and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2beta. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494668/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494668/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Weiqi -- Li, Jingyi -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Qu, Jing -- Wang, Ping -- Zhou, Junzhi -- Liu, Xiaomeng -- Ren, Ruotong -- Xu, Xiuling -- Ocampo, Alejandro -- Yuan, Tingting -- Yang, Jiping -- Li, Ying -- Shi, Liang -- Guan, Dee -- Pan, Huize -- Duan, Shunlei -- Ding, Zhichao -- Li, Mo -- Yi, Fei -- Bai, Ruijun -- Wang, Yayu -- Chen, Chang -- Yang, Fuquan -- Li, Xiaoyu -- Wang, Zimei -- Aizawa, Emi -- Goebl, April -- Soligalla, Rupa Devi -- Reddy, Pradeep -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Tang, Fuchou -- Liu, Guang-Hui -- Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua -- F32 AG047770/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 5;348(6239):1160-3. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa1356. Epub 2015 Apr 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; Diagnosis and Treatment Center for Oral Disease, the 306th Hospital of the PLA, Beijing, China. ; Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ; The Center for Anti-aging and Regenerative Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Universidad Catolica San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos s/n, 30107 Guadalupe, Murcia, Spain. ; Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Proliferation and Differentiation, Beijing 100871, China. Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine (CMTM), Beijing 100101, China. Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn tangfuchou@pku.edu.cn belmonte@salk.edu. ; National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. The Center for Anti-aging and Regenerative Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China. Center for Molecular and Translational Medicine (CMTM), Beijing 100101, China. Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing 100069, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn tangfuchou@pku.edu.cn belmonte@salk.edu. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn tangfuchou@pku.edu.cn belmonte@salk.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25931448" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/genetics/*metabolism ; Animals ; *Cell Aging ; Cell Differentiation ; Centromere/metabolism ; Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Exodeoxyribonucleases/genetics/*metabolism ; Gene Knockout Techniques ; HEK293 Cells ; Heterochromatin/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Membrane Proteins/metabolism ; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells/*metabolism ; Methyltransferases/genetics/metabolism ; Mice ; Models, Biological ; RecQ Helicases/genetics/*metabolism ; Repressor Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Werner Syndrome/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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