Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Language
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Background/Aim: This study aimed to clarify the potential of modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) as a prognostic biomarker and reveal the significance of fish oil (FO)-enriched nutrition in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and Methods: A total of 738 CRC patients from three different patient cohorts, including 670 patients in the biomarker study and 68 patients in the nutrition-intervention study, were analyzed. Results: High preoperative mGPS was significantly correlated with well-recognized disease progression factors and advanced UICC stage classification. In addition, high mGPS was an independent prognostic factor in both cohorts, especially in stage III and IV patients. These statuses were maintained in postoperative course and correlated with sarcopenia. Furthermore, FO-enriched nutrition suppressed systemic inflammatory reaction and improved skeletal muscle mass and prognosis, especially in CRC patients with mGPS 1 or 2. Conclusion: Assessment of mGPS could identify patients with high-risk CRC, who might be candidates for FO-enriched nutrition.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: PROSTATE-CANCER ; MELANOMA PATIENTS ; COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR ; RENAL-CELL CARCINOMA ; PULSED DENDRITIC CELLS ; REGULATORY T-CELLS ; tumor-antigen ; HIGH-FREQUENCIES ; MYELOID SUPPRESSOR-CELLS ; Peptide vaccine
    Abstract: IMA901 is the first therapeutic vaccine for renal cell cancer (RCC) consisting of multiple tumor-associated peptides (TUMAPs) confirmed to be naturally presented in human cancer tissue. We treated a total of 96 human leukocyte antigen A (HLA-A)*02(+) subjects with advanced RCC with IMA901 in two consecutive studies. In the phase 1 study, the T cell responses of the patients to multiple TUMAPs were associated with better disease control and lower numbers of prevaccine forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells. The randomized phase 2 trial showed that a single dose of cyclophosphamide reduced the number of T(reg) cells and confirmed that immune responses to multiple TUMAPs were associated with longer overall survival. Furthermore, among six predefined populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, two were prognostic for overall survival, and among over 300 serum biomarkers, we identified apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 17 (CCL17) as being predictive for both immune response to IMA901 and overall survival. A randomized phase 3 study to determine the clinical benefit of treatment with IMA901 is ongoing.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22842478
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: The timing of puberty is a highly polygenic childhood trait that is epidemiologically associated with various adult diseases. Using 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genotype data in up to approximately 370,000 women, we identify 389 independent signals (P 〈 5 x 10-8) for age at menarche, a milestone in female pubertal development. In Icelandic data, these signals explain approximately 7.4% of the population variance in age at menarche, corresponding to approximately 25% of the estimated heritability. We implicate approximately 250 genes via coding variation or associated expression, demonstrating significant enrichment in neural tissues. Rare variants near the imprinted genes MKRN3 and DLK1 were identified, exhibiting large effects when paternally inherited. Mendelian randomization analyses suggest causal inverse associations, independent of body mass index (BMI), between puberty timing and risks for breast and endometrial cancers in women and prostate cancer in men. In aggregate, our findings highlight the complexity of the genetic regulation of puberty timing and support causal links with cancer susceptibility.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28436984
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-04-02
    Description: Cpdm (chronic proliferative dermatitis) mice develop chronic dermatitis and an immunodeficiency with increased serum IgM, symptoms that resemble those of patients with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome and hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHM-ED), which is caused by mutations in NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator; also known as IKBKG). Spontaneous null mutations in the Sharpin (SHANK-associated RH domain interacting protein in postsynaptic density) gene are responsible for the cpdm phenotype in mice. SHARPIN shows significant similarity to HOIL-1L (also known as RBCK1), a component of linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which induces NF-kappaB activation through conjugation of linear polyubiquitin chains to NEMO. Here, we identify SHARPIN as an additional component of LUBAC. SHARPIN-containing complexes can linearly ubiquitinate NEMO and activated NF-kappaB. Thus, we re-define LUBAC as a complex containing SHARPIN, HOIL-1L, and HOIP (also known as RNF31). Deletion of SHARPIN drastically reduced the amount of LUBAC, which resulted in attenuated TNF-alpha- and CD40-mediated activation of NF-kappaB in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or B cells from cpdm mice. Considering the pleomorphic phenotype of cpdm mice, these results confirm the predicted role of LUBAC-mediated linear polyubiquitination in NF-kappaB activation induced by various stimuli, and strongly suggest the involvement of LUBAC-induced NF-kappaB activation in various disorders.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tokunaga, Fuminori -- Nakagawa, Tomoko -- Nakahara, Masaki -- Saeki, Yasushi -- Taniguchi, Masami -- Sakata, Shin-ichi -- Tanaka, Keiji -- Nakano, Hiroyasu -- Iwai, Kazuhiro -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 31;471(7340):633-6. doi: 10.1038/nature09815.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21455180" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD40 Ligand/metabolism ; Carrier Proteins/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes/*chemistry/*metabolism ; NF-kappa B/*metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism ; Ubiquitin/*metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-03-12
    Description: The cyclobutadiene (CBD) molecule C(4)H(4) deviates from a high-symmetry square geometry to compensate for its antiaromatic electronic structure. Here, we report a CBD silicon analog, Si(4)(EMind)(4) (1), stabilized by the bulky 1,1,7,7-tetraethyl-3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-s-hydrindacen-4-yl (EMind) groups, obtained as air- and moisture-sensitive orange crystals by the reduction of (EMind)SiBr(3) with three equivalents of lithium naphthalenide. X-ray crystallography reveals a planar and rhombic structure of the Si(4) four-membered ring, with alternating pyramidal and planar configurations at the silicon atoms. The large (29)Si chemical shift differences (Deltadelta 〉 350 parts per million) in the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectra suggest a contribution of an alternately charge-separated structure. The rhombic-shaped charge-separated singlet state of compound 1 thus stabilizes its cyclic 4pi-electron antiaromaticity in a manner that contrasts sharply with the bond-length alternation, characterizing the rectangular distortion of carbon-based CBD.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Suzuki, Katsunori -- Matsuo, Tsukasa -- Hashizume, Daisuke -- Fueno, Hiroyuki -- Tanaka, Kazuyoshi -- Tamao, Kohei -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Mar 11;331(6022):1306-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1199906.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Functional Elemento-Organic Chemistry Unit, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21393541" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-11-15
    Description: Although recent psychophysical studies indicate that visual awareness and top-down attention are two distinct processes, it is not clear how they are neurally dissociated in the visual system. Using a two-by-two factorial functional magnetic resonance imaging design with binocular suppression, we found that the visibility or invisibility of a visual target led to only nonsignificant blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effects in the human primary visual cortex (V1). Directing attention toward and away from the target had much larger and robust effects across all study participants. The difference in the lower-level limit of BOLD activation between attention and awareness illustrates dissociated neural correlates of the two processes. Our results agree with previously reported V1 BOLD effects on attention, while they invite a reconsideration of the functional role of V1 in visual awareness.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Watanabe, Masataka -- Cheng, Kang -- Murayama, Yusuke -- Ueno, Kenichi -- Asamizuya, Takeshi -- Tanaka, Keiji -- Logothetis, Nikos -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Nov 11;334(6057):829-31. doi: 10.1126/science.1203161.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. watanabe@tuebingen.mpg.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22076381" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; *Attention ; *Awareness ; Brain Mapping ; Female ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Oxygen/blood ; Photic Stimulation ; Vision, Ocular ; Visual Cortex/*physiology ; Visual Perception/*physiology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-10-02
    Description: Aim: This study aimed to clarify the difference in the clinicopathological and prognostic features between synchronous colorectal cancer (CRC) and solitary CRC. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted in patients with synchronous and solitary CRC. Results: A total of 92 (7.1%) out of 1,295 consecutive patients had synchronous CRC. Mucinous adenocarcinoma was more frequent in patients with synchronous CRC than in those with solitary CRC (13.0% vs. 3.7%; p〈0.001). The 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was poorer in patients with synchronous CRC than in those with solitary CRC (65.3% vs. 75.1%; p=0.035), which was contrived by the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=1.52(HR); p=0.039). Conclusion: Patients with synchronous CRC had a poorer RFS than those with solitary CRC; thus, patients with synchronous CRC might require more intensive care than those with solitary CRC in follow-up.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-07-31
    Description: Background: The revised Bethesda guidelines (rBG) are generally used for screening of Lynch syndrome, and few researchers have investigated the associations between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and each item of the rBG. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included patients with colorectal cancer who were classified into those fulfilling the rBG (Bethesda group) and those not (control group). The breakdown of each item in the rBG and predictors of high MSI (MSI-H) were determined in the Bethesda group. Results: Of 809 consecutive patients, 161 (19.9%) were found to fulfil the rBG criteria. As a predictor of MSI-H, items 2 or 5 of the rBG showed a sensitivity of 93.3%. Item 5 and right-sided tumour location were independent predictors of MSI-H in patients fulfilling the rBG (odds ratio(OR)=4.49 and 25.1; p=0.0260 and 〈0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: Item 5 of the rBG and right-sided tumour location are significant predictors of MSI-H.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-07-31
    Description: Background/Aim: The standard treatment for rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery. Mucinous carcinoma responds poorly to nCRT. In some patients, mucin lakes (MLs) are induced by nCRT. Identifying whether MLs are induced or originally present would be of great importance. Patients and Methods: We studied 20 patients with MLs (CRT-MC group) among 205 patients who received nCRT. Among 88 patients who did not receive nCRT, we studied 9 patients with mucinous carcinoma (non-CRT-MC group) and 18 patients with MLs in differentiated adenocarcinoma (non-CRT-AC group). Tumors were stained with high iron diamine-Alcian blue (HID-AB) and MUC1 staining. Results: Rate of AB〉HID staining of cancer cells was significantly higher in the CRT-MC group than in non-CRT-MC group (p=0.0004). Rate of MUC1 staining in MLs was significantly higher in the CRT-MC group (p=0.0254). Conclusion: nCRT can induce qualitative changes in mucinous components, however, other methods are required to distinguish induced components from originally existing components.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...