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  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; ACIDS ; NO ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; fatty acids ; FATTY-ACIDS ; DIETARY ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; CONSUMPTION ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; ASSOCIATIONS ; colon cancer ; WEIGHT ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; EPIC PROJECT ; HEIGHT
    Abstract: A link between unsaturated fatty acids or phytonutrients and reduced risk of colorectal cancer has been suggested. However, the effects of higher intake of dietary sources of these nutrients, such as the nuts and seeds food group, are less clear. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nut and seed intake on colorectal cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, a large prospective cohort study involving 10 European countries. Total nut and seed intake was determined from country-specific dietary questionnaires. The data set included 478,040 subjects (141,988 men, 336,052 women) with a total of 855 (327 men, 528 women) colon and 474 (215 men, 259 women) rectal cancer cases. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, stratified by center and controlled for fruit intake, dietary fiber, energy, height, weight, sex, age, physical activity, and smoking, was used. The data show no association between higher intake of nuts and seeds and risk of colorectal, colon, and rectal cancers in men and women combined, but a significant inverse association was observed in subgroup analyses for colon cancer in women at the highest (〉6.2 g/d) versus the lowest (nonconsumers; hazard ratio, 0.69;, 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.95) category of intake and for the linear effect of log-transformed intake (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.98), with no associations in men. It is not evident from this data why there may be a stronger association in women or why it may be limited to the colon, suggesting that much, further research is necessary
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15466975
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  • 2
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; EMPHYSEMA ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; NETWORKS ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENES ; TIME ; DNA ; AIR-POLLUTION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; REPAIR ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; RECRUITMENT ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; case-control study ; DETERMINANTS ; monitoring ; GSTM1 ; LEVEL ; ADDUCT ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; DNA damage ; DNA ADDUCT ; ABILITY ; GENDER ; OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION ; OZONE
    Abstract: Objectives were to investigate prospectively the ability of DNA adducts to predict cancer and to study the determinants of adducts, especially air pollutants. DNA adducts were measured in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC investigation. Cases included newly diagnosed lung cancer (n = 115), upper respiratory cancers (pharynx and larynx, n 82), bladder cancer (n = 124), leukemia (n = 166), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema deaths (n = 77) accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC former smokers and never-smokers. Three controls per case were matched for questionnaire analyses and two controls per case for laboratory analyses. Matching criteria were gender, age, smoking status, country of recruitment, and follow-up time. Individual exposure to air pollution was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Leukocyte DNA adducts were analyzed blindly using (32)p postlabeling technique. Adducts were associated with the subsequent risk of lung cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-3.931 when comparing detectable versus nondetectable adducts. The association with lung cancer was stronger in never-smokers (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.06-15.42) and among the younger age groups. After exclusion of the cancers occurring in the first 36 months of follow-up, the OR was 4.16 (95% CI, 1.24-13.88). A positive association was found between DNA adducts and ozone (O-3) concentration. Our prospective study suggests that leukocyte DNA adducts may predict lung cancer risk of never-smokers. Besides, the association of DNA adduct levels with O-3 indicates a possible role for photochemical smog in determining DNA damage
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16140979
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; LUNG ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; EPIC ; nutrition ; molecular epidemiology ; physical activity ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; biomarker ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; NEVER SMOKERS ; BLOOD GLUTATHIONE CONCENTRATIONS ; BULKY DNA-ADDUCTS ; EX-SMOKERS ; FORMER SMOKERS ; LIFE HABITS ; SMOKING-RELATED DISEASE
    Abstract: The association between physical activity, potential intermediate biomarkers and lung cancer risk was investigated in a study of 230 cases and 648 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition. Data on white blood cell aromatic-DNA adducts by 〈SU32〈/SUP-post-labelling and glutathione (GSH) in red blood cells were available from a subset of cases and controls. Compared with the first quartile, the fourth quartile of recreational physical activity was associated with a lower lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.90), higher GSH levels (+1.87 mu mol GSH g〈SU-1〈/SU haemoglobin, p = 0.04) but not with the presence of high levels of adducts (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.38-2.86). Despite being associated with recreational physical activity, in these small-scale pilot analyses GSH levels were not associated with lung cancer risk (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.84-1.07 per unit increase in GSH levels). Household and occupational activity was not associated with lung cancer risk or biomarker levels.〈/
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20050820
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; STAGE ; IDENTIFICATION ; HEALTH ; SNP ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; diabetes ; REPLICATION ; FUTURE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; methods ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; SCAN ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Type ; single nucleotide ; RISK-ASSOCIATED LOCI
    Abstract: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P = 2.14 x 10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P = 1.2 x 10(-7)). Methods: In the third stage of genome-wide association studies, we genotyped 106 JAZF1 SNPs in 10,286 PrCa cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry. Results: The strongest association was observed with the initial marker rs10486567, which now achieves genome-wide significance [P = 7.79 x 10(-11); ORHET, 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.27); ORHOM, 1.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.56)]. We did not confirm a previous suggestion of a stronger association of rs10486567 with aggressive disease (P = 1.60 x 10(-4) for aggressive cancer, n = 4,597; P = 3.25 x 10(-8) for non-aggressive cancer, n = 4,514). Based on a multilocus model with adjustment for rs10486567, no additional independent signals were observed at chromosome 7p15.2. There was no association between PrCa risk and SNPs in JAZF1 previously associated with height (rs849140; P = 0.587), body stature (rs849141, tagged by rs849136; P = 0.171), and risk of type 2 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (rs864745, tagged by rs849142; P = 0.657). Conclusion: rs10486567 remains the most significant marker for PrCa risk within JAZF1 in individuals of European ancestry. Impact: Future studies should identify all variants in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10486567 and evaluate their functional significance for PrCa. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1349-55. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20406958
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; human ; LUNG ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; EXPOSURE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MUTATION ; genetics ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; PCR ; CANCER-CELLS ; MUTATIONS ; RECRUITMENT ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; MULTICENTER ; lung neoplasms ; TP53 ; ADULT ; prospective studies ; PROTOONCOGENE ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; INTERVAL ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; prospective ; prospective study ; healthy subjects ; female ; Male ; CANCERS ; LIQUID ; EXPOSURES ; Aged ; Middle Aged ; CANCER-DIAGNOSIS ; Genes,p53 ; Longitudinal Studies ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins ; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
    Abstract: In cancer patients, plasma often contains mutant DNA released by cancer cells. We have assessed the significance of plasma DNA mutations for subsequent cancer development in healthy subjects in a large longitudinal prospective study. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study was analyzed with a nested case-control design. Cases were nonsmokers or ex-smokers for 〉10 years and newly diagnosed with lung, bladder, or upper aerodigestive tract cancers or leukemia accrued after a median follow-up of 6.3 years. Controls were matched 2:1 for follow-up, age, sex, area of recruitment, and smoking status. KRAS2 mutations were detected by mutant-enriched PCR and sequencing (n = 1,098). TP53 mutations were detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis, and sequencing (n = 550). KRAS2 or TP53 mutations were detected in 13 of 1,098 (1.2%) and 20 of 550 (3.6%) subjects, respectively, 16 of whom developed cancer on average after 18.3 months of follow-up. Among 137 subjects who developed bladder cancer, 5 had KRAS2 mutations [odds ratio (OR), 4.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.27-14.15] and 7 had TP53 mutations (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 0.66-4.97). There was a nonsignificant trend for association between TP53 mutations and bulky adducts in lymphocyte DNA (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 0.64-12.17). This is the first report of TP53 or KRAS2 mutations in the plasma of healthy subjects in a prospective study, suggesting that KRAS2 mutation is detectable ahead of bladder cancer diagnosis. TP53 mutation may be associated with environmental exposures. These observations have implications for monitoring early steps of carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16818665
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; DNA ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; RATS ; CONTRAST ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; ADDUCTS ; CARCINOGENS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; FOOD ; GUIDELINES ; VITAMIN-E ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; REGRESSION ; air pollution ; prospective studies ; N-NITROSAMINES ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; analysis ; prospective ; prospective study ; correlation ; BMI ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; non-smokers ; AMINE ; gastrointestinal ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; fibre intake ; haemoglobin adducts ; RESISTANT STARCH
    Abstract: In contrast to some extensively examined food mutagens, for example, aflatoxins, N-nitrosamines and heterocyclic amines, some other food contaminants, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other aromatic compounds, have received less attention. Therefore, exploring the relationships between dietary habits and the levels of biomarkers related to exposure to aromatic compounds is highly relevant. We have investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort the association between dietary items (food groups and nutrients) and aromatic DNA adducts and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts. Both types of adducts are biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and possibly of cancer risk, and were measured, respectively, in leucocytes and erythrocytes of 1086 (DNA adducts) and 190 (Hb adducts) non-smokers. An inverse. statistically significant, association has been found between DNA adduct levels and dietary fibre intake (P=0.02), vitamin E (P =0.04) and alcohol (P=0.03) but not with other nutrients or food groups. Also, an inverse association between fibre and fruit intake, and BMI and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts (P=0.03, 0.04, and 0.03 respectively) was observed. After multivariate regression analysis these inverse correlations remained statistically significant, except for the correlation adducts v. fruit intake. The present study suggests that fibre intake in the usual range can modify the level of DNA or Hb aromatic adducts, but Such role seems to be quantitatively modest. Fibres could reduce the formation of DNA adducts in different manners, by diluting potential food mutagens and carcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract, by speeding their transit through the colon and by binding carcinogenic substances
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18275627
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  • 8
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; DNA adducts ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; DNA ; RISK-FACTORS ; AIR-POLLUTION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; BREAST-CANCER ; LESIONS ; DESIGN ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; risk factors ; smoking ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; MUTATIONS ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; OXYGEN ; DNA repair ; EXCISION-REPAIR ; reactive oxygen species ; case-control study ; VARIANT ; air pollution ; INCREASE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; FUNCTIONAL-CHARACTERIZATION ; XPD POLYMORPHISMS ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; BASAL-CELL CARCINOMA ; CHROMOSOME 19Q13.2-3 ; GENE XRCC3
    Abstract: Environmental carcinogens contained in air pollution, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines or N-nitroso compounds, predominantly form DNA adducts but can also generate interstrand cross-links and reactive oxygen species. If unrepaired, such lesions increase the risk of somatic mutations and cancer. Our study investigated the relationships between 22 polymorphisms (and their haplotypes) in 16 DNA repair genes belonging to different repair pathways in 1094 controls and 567 cancer cases (bladder cancer, 131; lung cancer, 134; oral-pharyngeal cancer, 41; laryngeal cancer, 47; leukaemia, 179; death from emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 84). The design was a case-control study nested within a prospective investigation. Among the many comparisons, few polymorphisms were associated with the diseases at the univariate analysis: XRCC1-399 Gln/Gln variant homozygotes [odds ratios (OR) = 2.20, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.16-4.17] and XRCC3-241 Met/Met homozygotes (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27-0.96) and leukaemia. The recessive model in the stepwise multivariate analysis revealed a possible protective effect of XRCC1-399Gln/Gln in lung cancer (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.05-0.98), and confirmed an opposite effect (OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.02-6.02) in the leukaemia group. Our results also suggest that the XPD/ERCC1-GAT haplotype may modulate leukaemia (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02-1.61), bladder cancer (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.06-1.79) and possibly other cancer risks. Further investigations of the combined effects of polymorphisms within these DNA repair genes, smoking and other risk factors may help to clarify the influence of genetic variation in the carcinogenic process
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16308313
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SITE ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; lifestyle ; DECREASE ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; body mass index ; CARDIA ; cigarette smoking ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; ESOPHAGUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; gastric cancer,smoking,cohort study ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; HISTOLOGIC TYPE ; meat ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; SMOKERS ; STOMACH-CANCER ; SUBSITE ; TOBACCO SMOKING ; VEGETABLES
    Abstract: Smoking has recently been recognised as causally associated with the development of gastric cancer (GC). However, evidence on the effect by sex, duration and intensity of smoking, anatomic subsite and cessation of smoking is limited. Our objective was to assess the relation between tobacco use and GC incidence in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We studied data from 521,468 individuals recruited from 10 European countries taking part in the EPIC study. Participants completed lifestyle questionnaires that included questions on lifetime consumption of tobacco and diet in 1991-1998. Participants were followed until September 2002, and during that period 305 cases of stomach cancer were identified. After exclusions, 274 were eligible for the analysis, using the Cox proportional hazard model. After adjustment for educational level, consumption of fresh fruit, vegetables and preserved meat, alcohol intake and body mass index (BMI), there was a significant association between cigarette smoking and gastric cancer risk: the hazard ratio (HR) for ever smokers was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-1.94). The HR of current cigarette smoking was 1.73 (95% CI = 1.06-2.83) in males and 1.87 (95% CI = 1.12-3.12) in females. Hazard ratios increased with intensity and duration of cigarette smoked. A significant decrease of risk was observed after 10 years of quitting smoking. A preliminary analysis of 121 cases with identified anatomic site showed that current cigarette smokers had a higher HR of GC in the cardia (HR = 4.10) than in the distal part of the stomach (HR = 1.94). In this cohort, 17.6 % (95% CI = 10.5-29.5 %) of GC cases may be attributable to smoking. Findings from this large study support the causal relation between smoking and gastric cancer in this European population. Stomach cancer should be added to the burden of diseases caused by smoking. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14520702
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