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  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-072X
    Keywords: Root nodule symbiosis ; Rhizobium meliloti ; Medicago sativa ; Nitrogenase activity ; Regulation
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Symbiotic nitrogen fixation of Rhizobium meliloti bacteroids in Medicago sativa root nodules was suppressed by several inorganic nitrogen sources. Amino acids like glutamine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid, which can serve as sole nitrogen sources for the unnodulated plant did not influence nitrogenase activity of effective nodules, even at high concentrations. Ammonia and nitrate suppressed symbiotic nitrogen fixation in vivo only at concentrations much higher than those needed for suppression of nitrogenase activity in free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. The kinetics of suppression were slow compared with that of free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. On the other hand, nitrite, which acts as a direct inhibitor of nitrogenase, suppressed very quickly and at low concentrations. Glutamic acid and glutamine enhanced the effect of ammonia dramatically, while the suppression by nitrate was enhanced only slightly.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-072X
    Keywords: Legume lectins ; Rhizobial exopolysaccharides ; Rhizobial lipopolysaccharides ; Host specificity ; Root nodule symbiosis
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Acidic exopolysaccharides and O-antigen containing lipopolysaccharides were isolated from Rhizobium japonicum, R. leguminosarum, R. lupini, R. meliloti, R. phaseoli, cowpea Rhizobium sp. and a non-nodulating soil bacterium. Lectins from seeds of soybean (Glycine max), garden pea (Pisum sativum), lentil (Lens culinaris), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), field bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) and from wheat germ were tested for their capacity to precipitate rhizobial exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides in the Ouchterlony double diffusion test. Soybean lectin precipitated exclusively with the exopolysaccharide of R. japonicum, whereas the lectins from pea and lentil precipitated exopolysaccharides from all the fast growing strains of Rhizobium. Host range specific interactions between lipopolysaccharides and lectins were observed in the pea/lentil-R. leguminosarum and in the alfalfa-R. meliloti systems. Concanavalin A precipitated the exopolysaccharides of all fast growing strains of Rhizobium, the exopolysaccharide of the cowpea strain and several lipopolysaccharides of different Rhizobium species and thus did not show any correlation between polysaccharide binding and symbiotic specificity. Non-leguminous wheat germ agglutinin did not precipitate any of the rhizobial polysaccharides tested and the lipopolysaccharide of the soil bacterium did not precipitate with any of the lectins examined.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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