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  • 1
    Abstract: The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction 〈 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28032715
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  • 2
    Abstract: Noninvasive biomarkers for early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) diagnosis and disease risk stratification are greatly needed. We conducted a nested case-control study within the Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate prediagnostic microRNAs (miRs) as biomarkers of subsequent PDAC risk. A panel of eight miRs (miR-10a, -10b, -21-3p, -21-5p, -30c, -106b, -155 and -212) based on previous evidence from our group was evaluated in 225 microscopically confirmed PDAC cases and 225 controls matched on center, sex, fasting status and age/date/time of blood collection. MiR levels in prediagnostic plasma samples were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Logistic regression was used to model levels and PDAC risk, adjusting for covariates and to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Plasma miR-10b, -21-5p, -30c and -106b levels were significantly higher in cases diagnosed within 2 years of blood collection compared to matched controls (all p-values 〈0.04). Based on adjusted logistic regression models, levels for six miRs (miR-10a, -10b, -21-5p, -30c, -155 and -212) overall, and for four miRs (-10a, -10b, -21-5p and -30c) at shorter follow-up time between blood collection and diagnosis (〈/=5 yr, 〈/=2 yr), were statistically significantly associated with risk. A score based on the panel showed a linear dose-response trend with risk (p-value = 0.0006). For shorter follow-up (〈/=5 yr), AUC for the score was 0.73, and for individual miRs ranged from 0.73 (miR-212) to 0.79 (miR-21-5p).
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28542740
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  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Circulating oxysterols have been proposed as biological markers of disease risk. However, within-person reproducibility of circulating oxysterols over time is not well established. METHODS: We evaluated the one-year reproducibility of 11 oxysterols and lanosterol among 30 postmenopausal women with repeat blood samples in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) - Heidelberg, Germany cohort. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was performed to quantify serum concentrations of 22R-hydroxycholesterol, 2beta-hydroxycholesterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, 27-hydroxycholesterol, 22S-hydroxycholeterol, 24,2beta-epoxycholesterol, 5alpha,6beta-dihydroxycholestanol, 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol, 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol, 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol, 24-dihydrolanosterol, and lanosterol. We evaluated Spearman correlations and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between quantifiable concentrations measured in repeat samples taken one-year apart to estimate within-person reproducibility. RESULTS: Spearman correlations (ICCs) over one year ranged from 0 (ICC=0.10) for 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol and 0.10 (ICC=0.20) for 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol, representing low within-person stability, to 0.81 (ICC=0.75) for 27-hydroxycholesterol and 0.86 (ICC=0.91) for 24S-hydroxycholesterol, representing relatively high within-person stability. Correlations between oxysterols and lanosterol ranged from 0.01 between 24S-hydroxycholesterol and lanosterol to 0.70 between 5alpha,6alpha-epoxycholesterol and 5beta,6beta-epoxycholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that for 27-hydroxycholesterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol and lanosterol, a single serum measurement can reliably estimate average levels over a one-year period. Circulating oxysterols are of increasing interest in epidemiologic studies of chronic disease risk including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Our data suggest that within-person stability of oxysterols differs depending on the individual oxysterol evaluated. We identified four oxysterols and lanosterol as stable over time to inform the use of circulating oxysterols in epidemiologic studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29108727
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  • 4
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Meat intake has been consistently shown to be positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Part of that association may be mediated by body iron status, which is influenced by genetic factors. We aimed to test for interactions of genetic and dietary factors influencing body iron status in relation to the risk of incident type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The case-cohort comprised 9,347 case subjects and 12,301 subcohort participants from eight European countries. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from genome-wide association studies on iron status biomarkers and candidate gene studies. A ferritin-related gene score was constructed. Multiplicative and additive interactions of heme iron and SNPs as well as the gene score were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Higher heme iron intake (per 1 SD) was associated with higher ferritin levels (beta = 0.113 [95% CI 0.082; 0.144]), but not with transferrin (-0.019 [-0.043; 0.006]) or transferrin saturation (0.016 [-0.006; 0.037]). Five SNPs located in four genes (rs1799945 [HFE H63D], rs1800562 [HFE C282Y], rs236918 [PCK7], rs744653 [SLC40A1], and rs855791 [TMPRSS6 V736A]) were associated with ferritin. We did not detect an interaction of heme iron and the gene score on the risk of diabetes in the overall study population (Padd = 0.16, Pmult = 0.21) but did detect a trend toward a negative interaction in men (Padd = 0.04, Pmult = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: We found no convincing evidence that the interplay of dietary and genetic factors related to body iron status associates with type 2 diabetes risk above the level expected from the sum or product of the two individual exposures.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29167213
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  • 5
    Keywords: COHORT ; CARCINOGENESIS ; GREEN TEA ; CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; METAANALYSIS ; caffeine ; POOLED-ANALYSIS ; RATIONALE ; DATA-COLLECTION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Few modifiable risk factors have been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. There is little evidence for the effects of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or tea intake on risk of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea consumption with risk of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: This study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort, comprising male and female participants from 10 European countries. Between 1992 and 2000, there were 477,312 participants without cancer who completed a dietary questionnaire and were followed up to determine pancreatic cancer incidence. Coffee and tea intake was calibrated with a 24-hour dietary recall. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were computed using multivariable Cox regression. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 11.6 y, 865 first incidences of pancreatic cancers were reported. When divided into fourths, neither total intake of coffee (HR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.27; high vs low intake), decaffeinated coffee (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.76-1.63; high vs low intake), nor tea were associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR, 1.22, 95% CI, 0.95-1.56; high vs low intake). Moderately low intake of caffeinated coffee was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.02-1.74), compared with low intake. However, no graded dose response was observed, and the association attenuated after restriction to histologically confirmed pancreatic cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Based on an analysis of data from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort, total coffee, decaffeinated coffee, and tea consumption are not related to the risk of pancreatic cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23756220
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  • 6
    Keywords: ATHEROSCLEROSIS ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; PREVALENCE ; CHOLECYSTECTOMY ; FXR ; metabolic syndrome ; CHOLELITHIASIS ; FRAMINGHAM ; BILIARY LIPID SECRETION ; GALLBLADDER-DISEASE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Gallstones are common disorders associated with several cardiovascular risk factors. Gallstone formation and atherosclerosis may share key pathways, but studies on putative associations between gallstones and the risk of cardiovascular disease are sparse and non-conclusive. We studied the relationship between gallstones and the risk of subsequent cardiovascular diseases in the German arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: The study comprises 46,468 participants from EPIC-Potsdam and EPIC-Heidelberg aged 35-65 years, free of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes at baseline. Information about the gallstone status at baseline was ascertained via questionnaires. For all incident cases of myocardial infarction and stroke confirmation was obtained from the treating physician. Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: During eight years of follow-up, 919 participants suffered a stroke or myocardial infarction. After multivariable adjustment for established risk factors, subjects with reported gallstones (n = 4828) had an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (hazard rate ratio (HR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.50). In individuals, who underwent a cholecystectomy before baseline a 1.32-fold increase in risk was observed (95%CI: 1.05, 1.65). HRs differed depending on the presence of selected established risk factors (e.g. HR for cardiovascular diseases regarding gallstones in smokers = 1.66, 95%CI: 1.20, 2.30, and non-smokers = 1.09, 95%CI: 0.86, 1.38). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an increased cardiovascular risk for gallstone formers, which cannot be counteracted by gallbladder removal and opens up perspectives for individualized prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24177267
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  • 7
    Keywords: OVARIAN-CANCER ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVE USE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; NATURAL MENOPAUSE ; ISCHEMIC-HEART-DISEASE ; HORMONE-LEVELS ; NORWEGIAN WOMEN ; 37-YEAR FOLLOW-UP ; GRAND MULTIPAROUS WOMEN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Reproductive events are associated with important physiologic changes, yet little is known about how reproductive factors influence long-term health in women. Our objective was to assess the relation of reproductive characteristics with all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. METHODS: The analysis was performed within the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition prospective cohort study, which enrolled 〉500,000 women and men from 1992 to 2000, who were residing in a given town/geographic area in 10 European countries. The current analysis included 322,972 eligible women aged 25-70 years with 99 % complete follow-up for vital status. We assessed reproductive characteristics reported at the study baseline including parity, age at the first birth, breastfeeding, infertility, oral contraceptive use, age at menarche and menopause, total ovulatory years, and history of oophorectomy/hysterectomy. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality were determined using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for menopausal status, body mass index, physical activity, education level, and smoking status/intensity and duration. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.9 years, 14,383 deaths occurred. The HR (95 % CI) for risk of all-cause mortality was lower in parous versus nulliparous women (0.80; 0.76-0.84), in women who had ever versus never breastfed (0.92; 0.87-0.97), in ever versus never users of oral contraceptives (among non-smokers; 0.90; 0.86-0.95), and in women reporting a later age at menarche (〉/=15 years versus 〈12; 0.90; 0.85-0.96; P for trend = 0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Childbirth, breastfeeding, oral contraceptive use, and a later age at menarche were associated with better health outcomes. These findings may contribute to the development of improved strategies to promote better long-term health in women.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26515238
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  • 8
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Specific nutrients or foods have been inconsistently associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) risks. Thus, we investigated associations between diet as a whole, as dietary patterns, and UC and CD risks. METHODS: Within the prospective EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer) study, we set up a nested matched case-control study among 366,351 participants with inflammatory bowel disease data, including 256 incident cases of UC and 117 of CD, and 4 matched controls per case. Dietary intake was recorded at baseline from validated food frequency questionnaires. Incidence rate ratios of developing UC and CD were calculated for quintiles of the Mediterranean diet score and a posteriori dietary patterns produced by factor analysis. RESULTS: No dietary pattern was associated with either UC or CD risks. However, when excluding cases occurring within the first 2 years after dietary assessment, there was a positive association between a "high sugar and soft drinks" pattern and UC risk (incidence rate ratios for the fifth versus first quintile, 1.68 [1.00-2.82]; Ptrend = 0.02). When considering the foods most associated with the pattern, high consumers of sugar and soft drinks were at higher UC risk only if they had low vegetables intakes. CONCLUSIONS: A diet imbalance with high consumption of sugar and soft drinks and low consumption of vegetables was associated with UC risk. Further studies are needed to investigate whether microbiota alterations or other mechanisms mediate this association.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26717318
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  • 9
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI) measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1) metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI 〈 25 kg/m2), (2) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI 〉/= 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI 〈 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI 〉/= 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [〉/=80 cm for women and 〉/=94 cm for men]) were used (instead of BMI) to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a p-value of 〈0.05 was considered statistically significant. In multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models with BMI used to define adiposity, compared with metabolically healthy/normal weight individuals, we observed a higher colorectal cancer risk among metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (odds ratio [OR] = 1.59, 95% CI 1.10-2.28) and metabolically unhealthy/overweight (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.01-1.94) participants, but not among metabolically healthy/overweight individuals (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.65-1.42). Among the overweight individuals, lower colorectal cancer risk was observed for metabolically healthy/overweight individuals compared with metabolically unhealthy/overweight individuals (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.96). These associations were generally consistent when waist circumference was used as the measure of adiposity. To our knowledge, there is no universally accepted clinical definition for using C-peptide level as an indication of hyperinsulinaemia. Therefore, a possible limitation of our analysis was that the classification of individuals as being hyperinsulinaemic-based on their C-peptide level-was arbitrary. However, when we used quartiles or the median of C-peptide, instead of tertiles, as the cut-point of hyperinsulinaemia, a similar pattern of associations was observed. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the idea that individuals with the metabolically healthy/overweight phenotype (with normal insulin levels) are at lower colorectal cancer risk than those with hyperinsulinaemia. The combination of anthropometric measures with metabolic parameters, such as C-peptide, may be useful for defining strata of the population at greater risk of colorectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27046222
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  • 10
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The etiology of small intestinal cancer (SIC) is largely unknown, and there are very few epidemiological studies published to date. No studies have investigated abdominal adiposity in relation to SIC. METHODS: We investigated overall obesity and abdominal adiposity in relation to SIC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a large prospective cohort of approximately half a million men and women from ten European countries. Overall obesity and abdominal obesity were assessed by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Stratified analyses were conducted by sex, BMI, and smoking status. RESULTS: During an average of 13.9 years of follow-up, 131 incident cases of SIC (including 41 adenocarcinomas, 44 malignant carcinoid tumors, 15 sarcomas and 10 lymphomas, and 21 unknown histology) were identified. WC was positively associated with SIC in a crude model that also included BMI (HR per 5-cm increase = 1.20, 95 % CI 1.04, 1.39), but this association attenuated in the multivariable model (HR 1.18, 95 % CI 0.98, 1.42). However, the association between WC and SIC was strengthened when the analysis was restricted to adenocarcinoma of the small intestine (multivariable HR adjusted for BMI = 1.56, 95 % CI 1.11, 2.17). There were no other significant associations. CONCLUSION: WC, rather than BMI, may be positively associated with adenocarcinomas but not carcinoid tumors of the small intestine. IMPACT: Abdominal obesity is a potential risk factor for adenocarcinoma in the small intestine.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27294726
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