Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; neoplasms ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; RISK-FACTORS ; treatment ; LINKAGE ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; AGE ; risk factors ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; CANCER PATIENTS ; TRENDS ; REGISTRY ; cancer registries ; PRIMARY TUMORS ; SWITZERLAND ; INTERVAL ; PRIMARY NEOPLASMS ; second primary cancers ; cancer registry ; pooled analysis ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; REGISTRIES ; population-based ; PRIMARY MALIGNANCIES ; second primary cancer
    Abstract: Context: Increasing incidence and improved prognosis of thyroid cancer have led to concern about the development of second primary cancers, especially after radioiodine treatment. Thyroid cancer can also arise as a second primary neoplasm after other cancers. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the risk of second primary cancer after thyroid cancer and vice versa. Design: This was a multinational record linkage study. Setting: The study was conducted at 13 population-based cancer registries in Europe, Canada, Australia, and Singapore. Patients or Other Participants: A cohort of 39,002 people (356,035 person-yr of follow-up) with primary thyroid cancer were followed up for SPN for up to 25 yr, and 1,990 cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed after another primary cancer. Main Outcome Measures: To assess any possible excess of second primary neoplasms after thyroid cancer, the observed numbers of neoplasms were compared with expected numbers derived from age-, the cancer registries, yielding standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). The SIR of second primary thyroid cancer after various types of cancer was also calculated. Results: During the observation period, there were 2821 second primary cancers (all sites combined) after initial diagnosis of thyroid cancer, SIR of 1.31 ( 95% confidence interval 1.26 - 1.36) with significantly elevated risks for many specific cancers. Significantly elevated risks of second primary thyroid cancer were also seen after many types of cancer. Conclusion: Pooled data from 13 cancer registries show a 30% increased risk of second primary cancer after thyroid cancer and increased risks of thyroid cancer after various primary cancers. Although bias (detection, surveillance, misclassification) and chance may contribute to some of these observations, it seems likely that shared risk factors and treatment effects are implicated in many. When following up patients who have been treated for primary thyroid cancer, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for second primary cancers
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16478820
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; neoplasms ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; TIME ; PATIENT ; treatment ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; MALIGNANCIES ; AGE ; BRCA1 ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; colorectal cancer ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; chemotherapy ; leukemia ; BLADDER-CANCER ; MUTATIONS ; paclitaxel ; MALIGNANCY ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; FAMILIES ; INCREASE ; leukaemia ; female ; CANCERS ; RARE ; colorectal ; INCREASES ; multi-centre cohort study ; second primary cancer ; primary fallopian tube cancer ; PRIMARY-CARCINOMA
    Abstract: Primary fallopian tube cancer (PFTC) is a rare disease, and its aetiological factors are poorly understood. Studies on PFTC in the setting of 2nd primary malignant neoplasms can provide clues on aetiology and also define the possible side effects of different treatment modalities for PFTC. A cohort of 2,084 cases with first PFTC was extracted from the data from 13 cancer registries from Europe, Canada, Australia and Singapore and followed for second primary cancers within the period 1943-2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated and Poisson regression analyses were done to find out the RRs related to age at, period or and time since the PFTC diagnosis. There were 118 cancer cases observed after first PFTC (SIR 1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.6). Elevated SIRs were seen for colorectal cancer (1.7, 95%CI 1.0-2.6), for breast cancer (1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.2), for bladder cancer (2.8, 95%CI 1.0-6.0), for lung cancer (1.8, 95% CI 0.9-3.2) and for nonlymphoid leukaemia (3.7, 95%CI 1.0-9.4). Significant risk increases were detected for colorectal cancer during the 2nd to 5th year after the first PFTC diagnosis, for breast cancer in follow-up 10+ and for nonlymphoid leukaemia during the 2nd to 10th year. The clustering of cancers of the lung and bladder in PFTC patients may suggest shared smoking aetiology. The excess of colorectal and breast cancers after PFTC may indicate a genetic aetiology. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17266029
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; TUMORS ; kidney ; treatment ; BREAST-CANCER ; chemotherapy ; LONG-TERM SURVIVORS ; ETOPOSIDE ; TESTICULAR CANCER ; COMBINATION CHEMOTHERAPY ; leukaemia ; nonseminoma ; BLEOMYCIN ; NORWEGIAN MALE-PATIENTS ; SECONDARY LEUKEMIA ; seminomas
    Abstract: We investigated the risk of second malignancies among 29,511 survivors of germ-cell testicular cancer recorded in 13 cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated comparing the observed numbers of second malignancies with the expected numbers obtained from sex-, age-, period- and population-specific incidence rates. Seminomas and nonseminomas, the 2 main histological groups of testicular cancer, were analyzed separately. During a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (0-35 years), we observed 1,811 second tumors, with a corresponding SIR of 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57-1.73). Statistically significant increased risks were found for fifteen cancer types, including SIRs of 2.0 or higher for cancers of the stomach, gallbladder and bile ducts, pancreas, bladder, kidney, thyroid, and for soft-tissue sarcoma. nonmelanoma skin cancer and myeloid leukemia. The SIR for myeloid leukemia was 2.39 (95% CI: 1.41-3.77) after seminomas. and 6.77 (95% CI: 4.14-10.5) after nonseminomas. It increased to 37.9 (95% CI: 18.9-67.8; based on 11 observed cases of leukemia) among nonseminoma patients diagnosed since 1990. SIRs for most solid cancers increased with follow-up duration, whereas they, did not change with year of testicular cancer diagnosis. Among subjects diagnosed before 1980, 20 year survivors of seminoma had a cumulative risk of solid cancer of 9.6% (95% CI: 8.7-10.5%) vs. 6.5% expected, whereas 20 years survivors of nonseminoma had a risk of 5.0% (95% CI: 4.2-6.0%) vs. 3.1% expected. In conclusion, survivors of testicular cancers have an increased risk of several second primaries, where the effect of the treatment seems to play a major role. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17096341
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: BREAST-CANCER ; EXPERIENCE ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ; ESTROGEN ; INCREASED RISK ; PROGESTERONE ; FAMILIAL SYNDROME ; MIXED MULLERIAN TUMORS
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Uterine sarcomas (US) are rare malignancies with unclear aetiology. Studies on uterine sarcomas in the setting of second primary malignant tumours can provide clues to aetiology and identify side effects of different treatments. METHODS: A cohort of 8606 cases of US was extracted from the data from 13 cancer registries and followed for second primary cancers within the period 1943-2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, and Poisson regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: There were 499 cancer cases observed after a first diagnosis of US (SIR 1.26, 95%CI 1.16-1.38). SIRs were elevated for cancers of the mouth and pharynx (2.16, 95%CI 1.15-3.69), colorectum (1.60, 95%CI 1.28-1.98), lung (1.73, 95%CI 1.27-2.29), breast (1.25, 95%CI 1.05-1.49), urinary bladder (1.74, 95%CI 1.02-2.79), kidney (2.00, 95%CI 1. 24-3.06), thyroid gland (2.74, 95%CI 1.42-4.79), and soft tissue sarcoma (5.23, 95%CI 2.51-9.62). The risk of breast cancer increased along with increasing age of US diagnosis (p trend 0.040). The risk of kidney cancer increased along with decreasing age of US diagnosis (p trend 0.004) and short time since the US diagnosis (p trend 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated increased risk of certain cancers following a diagnosis of US. The elevated risk for breast cancer may indicate shared hormonal aetiology, while the increased risk of colorectal and bladder cancers after US may be caused by radiation therapy of US. The clustering of smoking-related cancers after US is worth exploring in the future.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22487538
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; LUNG ; DIAGNOSIS ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; SITE ; TISSUE ; TIME ; kidney ; RISK-FACTORS ; SKIN ; treatment ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; RATES ; leukemia ; MELANOMA ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; DENMARK ; TAMOXIFEN ; REGISTRY ; cancer registries ; GLAND ; PRIMARY NEOPLASMS ; second primary cancers ; cancer registry ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; REGISTRIES ; population-based ; CANCER-DIAGNOSIS ; female breast cancer ; FEMALE-POPULATION ; multi-centre cohort study ; second primary cancer
    Abstract: A large number of women survive a diagnosis of breast cancer. Knowledge of their risk of developing a new primary cancer is important not only in relation to potential side effects of their cancer treatment, but also in relation to the possibility of shared etiology with other types of cancer. A cohort of 525,527 women with primary breast cancer was identified from 13 population-based cancer registries in Europe, Canada, Australia and Singapore, and followed for second primary cancers within the period 1943-2000. We used cancer incidence rates of first primary cancer for the calculation of standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of second primary cancer. Risk of second primary breast cancer after various types of nonbreast cancer was also computed. For all second cancer sites combined, except contralateral breast cancer, we found a SIR of 1.25 (95% CI = 1.24-1.26) on the basis of 31,399 observed cases after first primary breast cancer. The overall risk increased with increasing time since breast cancer diagnosis and decreased by increasing age at breast cancer diagnosis. There were significant excesses of many different cancer sites; among these the excess was larger than 150 cases for stomach (SIR = 1.35), colorectal (SIR = 1.22), lung (SIR = 1.24), soft tissue sarcoma (SIR = 2.25), melanoma (SIR = 1.29), non-melanoma skin (SIR = 1.58), endometrium (SIR = 1.52), ovary (SIR = 1.48), kidney (SIR = 1.27), thyroid gland (SIR = 1.62) and leukaemia (SIR = 1.52). The excess of cancer after a breast cancer diagnosis is likely to be explained by treatment for breast cancer and by shared genetic or environmental risk factors, although the general excess of cancer suggests that there may be additional explanations such as increased surveillance and general cancer susceptibility. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16342146
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...