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  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Maternal and infant welfare ; Medicine & Public Health ; Maternal and Child Health ; Springer eBooks
    Pages: : digital
    ISBN: 9781441914996
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-6628
    Keywords: Maternal and child health ; assessment ; planning ; monitoring ; surveillance ; data ; indicators ; outcomes ; performance
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Objectives: Further improvements in the health of mothers and children depend, in part, on collecting, analyzing, and interpreting relevant data correctly. Despite consistent efforts to improve data capacity and use during the past two decades, the need persists for a model set of maternal and child health (MCH) indicators to guide decisions about health conditions to be monitored, elements to be included in data sets, and definitions of measures. This article describes development, key characteristics, and major applications of a set of MCH Model Indicators (MCH MI) created to address these needs. Methods: A conceptual model with five domains was created to organize and guide development of the indicators. The development process included systematic specification of concepts, formulas, age/gender groups, and data sources, as well as recommendations for frequency of surveillance. Information sources included published reports and expert opinion. Results: There are 217 indicators distributed across domains as follows: 75 health status, 9 contextual characteristics, 16 health systems capacity and adequacy, 49 risk/protective status, and 68 health and related services. Twenty of the indicators, all of them in the health status domain, are recommended for routine surveillance. Conclusions: The indicators can be used to identify and address MCH problems, to complement and expand other sets of MCH indicators, to serve as standards for consistent definitions, to provide guidance for creation and revision of MCH and related data bases, and to provide a foundation for the development of related sets of indicators. Some of the indicators require further development, but the total MCH MI package constitutes a solid foundation for subsequent work, as well as for ongoing modifications that are essential if the Model Indicators are to remain responsive to MCH needs.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-6628
    Keywords: Maternal and child health epidemiology ; state health agency ; analytic capacity building
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Objectives: The Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Program (MCHEP), jointly sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), was evaluated in 1996–1997. As part of this evaluation, an effort was undertaken to identify components of effective MCH epidemiology, to examine their prevalence across participating states, and to assess differences with respect to these components between MCHEP and non-MCHEP states. Methods: A case-study evaluation was undertaken in which nine states (five MCHEP and four non-MCHEP) rated themselves on a benchmark questionnaire and participated in interviews conducted during site visits. At the completion of the evaluation, 16 components of effective MCH epidemiology in state health agencies were identified. The nine states were rated by the evaluation team on each component. Ratings across all states and between MCHEP and non-MCHEP states were compared. Results: There was a great deal of variability among the nine states with respect to the presence of the components of effective MCH epidemiology. Components on which the states appeared weakest overall were the presence of adequately trained personnel, the presence of adequate management information systems to support MCH programs, and whether the state health agency's epidemiologic unit understands the MCH planning cycle. States with an MCHEP assignee had a higher overall mean score than non-MCHEP states across all components. There were seven components on which the two groups of states differed. These include whether the MCH director is empowered in the state health agency, whether the state health agency has identified internal epidemiologic capacity building as a priority, and whether analytic leadership is available for MCH epidemiologic activities. Conclusions: Building and maintaining MCH epidemiologic capacity in state health agencies requires attention to a variety of factors. While the presence of an MCH epidemiologist is important, this is only one of many components that must be considered as both the federal and state governments seek to promote and institutionalize effective MCH epidemiology in state health agencies.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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