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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COMMON ; INFORMATION ; EXPOSURE ; HISTORY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; meningioma ; TISSUE ; IMPACT ; RISK-FACTORS ; TISSUES ; tumour ; FREQUENCY ; FIELD ; FREQUENCIES ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; SWEDEN ; FRANCE ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; study design ; AUSTRALIA ; FINLAND ; case control study ; case-control study ; RE ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; INCREASE ; GLIOMA ; RECALL ; GLAND ; case control studies ; methods ; CELLULAR-TELEPHONE USE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; E ; carcinogenic ; INCREASES ; case control ; acoustic neuroma ; brain tumours ; mobile phone ; MOBILE PHONE USE ; SETUP ; acoustic neurinoma ; benign tumours ; case-control ; CORDLESS TELEPHONES ; FIELDS ; mobile phones ; parotid gland tumours ; SELECTION BIAS
    Abstract: The very rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in the possible health effects of exposure to radio frequency (RF) fields. A multinational case-control study, INTERPHONE, was set-up to investigate whether mobile phone use increases the risk of cancer and, more specifically, whether the RF fields emitted by mobile phones are carcinogenic. The study focused on tumours arising in the tissues most exposed to RF fields from mobile phones: glioma, meningioma, acoustic neurinoma and parotid gland tumours. In addition to a detailed history of mobile phone use, information was collected on a number of known and potential risk factors for these tumours. The study was conducted in 13 countries. Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the UK using a common core protocol. This paper describes the study design and methods and the main characteristics of the study population. INTERPHONE is the largest case-control study to date investigating risks related to mobile phone use and to other potential risk factors for the tumours of interest and includes 2,765 glioma, 2,425 meningioma, 1,121 acoustic neurinoma, 109 malignant parotid gland tumour cases and 7,658 controls. Particular attention was paid to estimating the amount and direction of potential recall and participation biases and their impact on the study results
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17636416
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1365-2133
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Tinea pedis is a condition that is common, often undiagnosed and frequently inadequately treated. It is reported as being rare in young children, but there are relatively few population-based reports of prevalence. A randomized sample of 2491 students from schools throughout the State of Victoria, Australia, were examined by dermatologists and dermatology registrars, who recorded clinical signs suggestive of tinea pedis, which were then confirmed by fungal culture. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of culture-proven tinea pedis was 5.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.58–6.82] increasing with age from 2.1% (95% CI 0.95–3.28) in 4–6 year olds to 9.7% (95% CI 5.21–14.26) in 16–18 year olds. A higher proportion of males (6.0%) had tinea pedis than females (4.3%). Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum were the most common dermatophytes isolated on culture. Less than 40% of those with a positive diagnosis had reported on the questionnaire that they had tinea. Of those who reported correctly that they had tinea, 75% had used one or more products to treat their condition, of which more than 40% were classified as unlikely to have any therapeutic effect on tinea pedis. These data confirm that tinea pedis, a potentially transmissible disease, is common in Australian schoolchildren, including those in primary school. There is a need for education programmes in schools on the nature of tinea pedis, the treatment available, and the public health approach to infection control within the school and home environment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2133
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Although seborrhoeic keratoses (SKs) appear to be very common, there are very few studies reporting details of age-specific prevalence, distribution or possible cause. We report details on the frequency, nature and distribution of SKs in 100 Australian adults in the age groups 15–25, 26–50, 51–75 and those aged more than 75 years. There was an increase in prevalence of SKs from 12% of 15–25 year olds to 100% of those aged more than 50 years. The median number of lesions in those with them also increased with age from six per person in 15–25 year olds to 69 per person in those aged more than 75 years. There was no difference in prevalence or numbers of lesions/person between males and females. SKs on exposed areas were more often flat and more than 3mm in diameter than those on the non-exposed areas. There was a higher prevalence of SKs on the exposed areas than non-exposed areas when taking into account the surface area. The data in this study demonstrate an increased frequency of SKs compared with those reported from the United Kingdom recently and from Australasia in the past, a phenomenon paralleling the changing frequency of skin cancer in these populations. This fact, plus the finding that SKs were more common as a function of skin surface area on the exposed areas of the body, suggests that sunlight may play a part in their development in those people who are predisposed to develop them.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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