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  • 1
    Keywords: THERAPY ; HEALTH ; WOMEN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy on ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: Individual participant datasets from 52 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally. The principal analyses involved the prospective studies (with last hormone therapy use extrapolated forwards for up to 4 years). Sensitivity analyses included the retrospective studies. Adjusted Poisson regressions yielded relative risks (RRs) versus never-use. FINDINGS: During prospective follow-up, 12 110 postmenopausal women, 55% (6601) of whom had used hormone therapy, developed ovarian cancer. Among women last recorded as current users, risk was increased even with 〈5 years of use (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.31-1.56; p〈0.0001). Combining current-or-recent use (any duration, but stopped 〈5 years before diagnosis) resulted in an RR of 1.37 (95% CI 1.29-1.46; p〈0.0001); this risk was similar in European and American prospective studies and for oestrogen-only and oestrogen-progestagen preparations, but differed across the four main tumour types (heterogeneity p〈0.0001), being definitely increased only for the two most common types, serous (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.40-1.66; p〈0.0001) and endometrioid (1.42, 1.20-1.67; p〈0.0001). Risk declined the longer ago use had ceased, although about 10 years after stopping long-duration hormone therapy use there was still an excess of serous or endometrioid tumours (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46, p=0.005). INTERPRETATION: The increased risk may well be largely or wholly causal; if it is, women who use hormone therapy for 5 years from around age 50 years have about one extra ovarian cancer per 1000 users and, if its prognosis is typical, about one extra ovarian cancer death per 1700 users. FUNDING: Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25684585
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; COMMON ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; FREQUENCIES ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; genetics ; SNP ; cancer risk ; REPLICATION ; case-control studies ; molecular biology ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; VARIANT ; SNPs ; GENOTYPE ; CANCER-RISK ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; Genetic ; Genome-wide association studies ; INVASIVE OVARIAN
    Abstract: Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case-control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially, three SNPs (rs2107425 in MRPL23, rs7313833 in PTHLH, rs3803662 in TNRC9) were weakly associated with ovarian cancer risk and one SNP (rs4954956 in NXPH2) was associated with serous ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white subjects (P-trend 〈 0.1). These four SNPs were then genotyped in an additional 4060 cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1.01-1.13, P-trend = 0.02 for all types of ovarian cancer and OR 1.14 95% CI 1.07-1.22, P-trend = 0.00017 for serous ovarian cancer]. In conclusion, we found that rs4954956 was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, particularly for serous ovarian cancer. However, none of the six confirmed breast cancer susceptibility variants we tested was associated with ovarian cancer risk. Further work will be needed to identify the causal variant associated with rs4954956 or elucidate its function
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19304784
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; REPLICATION ; glycosylation ; ONCOLOGY ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; biomarker ; CANCER-RISK ; Genetic ; single nucleotide
    Abstract: Aberrant glycosylation is a well-described hallmark of cancer. In a previous ovarian cancer case control study that examined polymorphisms in 26 glycosylation-associated genes, we found strong statistical evidence (P = 0.00017) that women who inherited two copies of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, GALNT1, had decreased ovarian cancer risk. The current study attempted to replicate this observation. The GALNT1 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17647532 was genotyped in 6,965 cases and 8,377 controls from 14 studies forming the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. The fixed effects estimate per rs17647532 allele was null (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.07). When a recessive model was fit, the results were unchanged. Test for hetero geneity of the odds ratios revealed consistency across the 14 replication sites but significant differences compared with the original study population (P = 0.03). This study underscores the need for replication of putative findings in genetic association studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(2); 600-4. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20142253
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  • 4
    Keywords: TUMORS ; polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; HETEROZYGOSITY ; MUTATIONS ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; LOCUS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association studies ; Meiosis ; risk of ovarian cancer
    Abstract: Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines; AIFM2, AKTIP, AXIN2, CASP5, FILIP1L, RBBP8, RGC32, RUVBL1 and STAG3. Sixty-three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in these genes were genotyped in 1,799 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 3,045 controls to look for associations with disease risk. Two SNPs in RUVBL1, rs13063604 and rs7650365, were associated with increased risk of serous ovarian cancer [HetOR = 1.42 (1.15-1.74) and the HomOR = 1.63 (1.10-1.42), p-trend = 0.0002] and [HetOR = 0.97 (0.80-1.17), HomOR = 0.74 (0.58-0.93), p-trend = 0.009], respectively. We genotyped rs13063604 and rs7650365 in an additional 4,590 cases and 6,031 controls from ten sites from the United States, Europe and Australia; however, neither SNP was significant in Stage 2. We also evaluated the potential role of tSNPs in these nine genes in ovarian cancer development by testing for allele-specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 286 primary ovarian tumours. We found frequent LOH for tSNPs in AXIN2, AKTIP and RGC32 (64, 46 and 34%, respectively) and one SNP, rs1637001, in STAG3 showed significant allele-specific LOH with loss of the common allele in 94% of informative tumours (p = 0.015). Array comparative genomic hybridisation indicated that this nonrandom allelic imbalance was due to amplification of the rare allele. In conclusion, we show evidence for the involvement of a common allele of STAG3 in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20635389
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; RISK ; FAMILY ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; MUTATIONS ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: Purpose: An assay for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs61764370, has recently been commercially marketed as a clinical test to aid ovarian cancer risk evaluation in women with family histories of the disease. rs67164370 is in a 3'-UTR miRNA binding site of the KRAS oncogene and is a candidate for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) susceptibility. However, only one published article, analyzing fewer than 1,000 subjects in total, has examined this association. Experimental Design: Risk association was evaluated in 8,669 cases of invasive EOC and 10,012 controls from 19 studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, and in 683 cases and 2,044 controls carrying BRCA1 mutations from studies in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Prognosis association was also examined in a subset of five studies with progression-free survival (PFS) data and 18 studies with all-cause mortality data. Results: No evidence of association was observed between genotype and risk of unselected EOC (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95-1.10), serous EOC (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.98-1.18), familial EOC (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.78-1.54), or among women carrying deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.88-1.36). There was little evidence for association with survival time among unselected cases (HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 0.99-1.22), among serous cases (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.99-1.28), or with PFS in 540 cases treated with carboplatin and paclitaxel (HR = 1.18, 95% CI: 0.93-1.52). Conclusions: These data exclude the possibility of an association between rs61764370 and a clinically significant risk of ovarian cancer or of familial ovarian cancer. Use of this SNP for ovarian cancer clinical risk prediction, therefore, seems unwarranted.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21385923
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; neoplasms ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; REDUCED RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; CANCER RISKS ; REPLICATION ; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; HETEROGENEITY ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; BRCA2 ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; analysis ; USA ; CANDIDATE ; CANCER-RISK ; COMMON VARIANT ; CASP8 GENE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; CONSORTIUM ; NUCLEOTIDE
    Abstract: The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H (rs144848) in BRCA2, rs2854344 in intron 17 of RB1, rs2811712 5' flanking CDKN2A, rs523349 in the 3' UTR of SRD5A2, D302H (rs1045485) in CASP8 and L10P (rs1982073) in TGFB1. Fourteen studies genotyped 4,624 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 8,113 controls of white non-Hispanic origin. A marginally significant association was found for RB1 when all studies were included [ordinal odds ratio (OR) 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.00) p = 0.041 and dominant OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.76-0.98) p = 0.025]; when the studies that originally suggested an association were excluded, the result was suggestive although no longer statistically significant (ordinal OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). This SNP has also been shown to have an association with decreased risk in breast cancer. There was a suggestion of an association for AURKA, when one study that caused significant study heterogeneity was excluded [ordinal OR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.20) p = 0.027; dominant OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.01-1.24) p = 0.03]. The other 5 SNPs in BRCA2, CDKN2A, SRD5A2, CASP8 and TGFB1 showed no association with ovarian cancer risk; given the large sample size, these results can also be considered to be informative. These null results for SNPs identified from relatively large initial studies shows the importance of replicating associations by a consortium approach. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18431743
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; BREAST ; HEALTH ; MUTATIONS ; ENVELOPE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SYNE-1 ; CANDIDATE SNPS ; single nucleotide
    Abstract: We genotyped 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) region in three population-based case-control studies of epithelial ovarian cancer conducted in the United States, comprising a total of 1,128 and 1,866 non-Hispanic white invasive cases and controls, respectively. A SNP 19 kb downstream of ESR1. (rs2295190, G-to-T change) was associated with invasive ovarian cancer risk, with a per-T-allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.44, P = 0.0061. rs2295190 is a nonsynonymous coding SNP in a neighboring gene called spectrin repeat containing, nuclear envelope I (SYNE1), which is involved in nuclear organization and structural integrity, function of the Golgi apparatus, and cytokinesis. An isoform encoded by SYNE1 has been reported to be down-regulated in ovarian and other cancers. rs2295190 was genotyped in an additional 12 Studies through the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, with 5,279 invasive epithelial cases and 7,450 controls. The per-T-allele OR for this 12-study set was 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02-1.17; P = 0.017). Results for the serous subtype in the 15 combined studies were similar to those overall (n = 3,545; OR, 1.09; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.18; P = 0.025), and our findings were strongest for the mucinous subtype (n = 447; OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.11-1.58; P = 0.002). No association was observed for the endometrioid Subtype. In an additional analysis of 1,459 borderline ovarian cancer cases and 7,370 controls, rs2295190 was not associated with risk. These data provide suggestive evidence that the rs2295190 T allele, or another allele in linkage disequilibrium with it, may be associated with increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 190); 245-50. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20056644
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  • 8
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; carcinoma ; RISK ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA ; TRENDS ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; TGF-BETA ; DECORIN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR) among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U. S.-based studies (discovery set), 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1) and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2). The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (P-heterogeneity 〉= 0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; P-trend = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (P-heterogeneity 〉= 0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; P-trend 〈= 0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (P-heterogeneity 〈= 0.03), which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (P-interaction 〈= 0.003), age at diagnosis (P-interaction=0.04), and year of diagnosis (P-interaction=0.05) in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls). We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21637745
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; RISK ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; CONSORTIUM ; MULTIPLE
    Abstract: Background: We previously reported an association between rs2660753, a prostate cancer susceptibility polymorphism, and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC; OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.4, P-trend = 0.01) that showed a stronger association with the serous histological subtype (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.5, P-trend = 0.003). Methods: We sought to replicate this association in 12 other studies comprising 4,482 cases and 6,894 controls of white non-Hispanic ancestry in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Results: No evidence for an association with all cancers or serous cancers was observed in a combined analysis of data from the replication studies (all: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.9-1.1, P-trend = 0.61; serous: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.9-1.1, P-trend = 0.85) or from the combined analysis of discovery and replication studies (all: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 1.0-1.1, P-trend = 0.28; serous: OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.2, P-trend = 0.11). There was no evidence for statistical heterogeneity in ORs across the studies. Conclusions: Although rs2660753 is a strong prostate cancer susceptibility polymorphism, the association with another hormonally related cancer, invasive EOC, is not supported by this replication study. Impact: Our findings, based on a larger sample size, emphasize the importance of replicating potentially promising genetic risk associations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21415361
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  • 10
    Keywords: carcinoma ; fibroblasts ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; REVERSE-TRANSCRIPTASE HTERT ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; TERT-CLPTM1L LOCUS ; BUCCAL CELLS
    Abstract: TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOG, we analyzed similar to 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 x 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 x 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 x 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 x 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 x 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 x 10-14) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 x 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23535731
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