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  • 1
    Keywords: IN-VIVO ; fibroblasts ; OXIDATIVE STRESS ; OSTEOPOROSIS ; HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE ; DNA MUTATIONS ; SKELETAL-MUSCLE MASS ; AGED HUMAN SKIN ; BONE MASS ; SARCOPENIA
    Abstract: P〉The free radical theory of aging postulates that the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is the major determinant of aging and lifespan. Its role in aging of the connective tissue has not yet been established, even though the incidence of aging-related disorders in connective tissue-rich organs is high, causing major disability in the elderly. We have now addressed this question experimentally by creating mice with conditional deficiency of the mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase in fibroblasts and other mesenchyme-derived cells of connective tissues in all organs. Here, we have shown for the first time that the connective tissue-specific lack of superoxide anion detoxification in the mitochondria results in reduced lifespan and premature onset of aging-related phenotypes such as weight loss, skin atrophy, kyphosis (curvature of the spine), osteoporosis and muscle degeneration in mutant mice. Increase in p16INK4a, a robust in vivo marker for fibroblast aging, may contribute to the observed phenotype. This novel model is particularly suited to decipher the underlying mechanisms and to develop hopefully novel connective tissue-specific anti-aging strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21108731
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  • 2
    ISSN: 0014-5793
    Keywords: DNA methylation and DNA-protein interaction. ; DNA methyltransferase ; Eukaryotic DNA methylation ; Pattern of DNA methylation ; Promoter methylation and long-term inactivation ; Spreading of DNA methylation
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-10-27
    Description: Unresolved anisotropies of the cosmic near-infrared background radiation are expected to have contributions from the earliest galaxies during the epoch of reionization and from faint, dwarf galaxies at intermediate redshifts. Previous measurements were unable to pinpoint conclusively the dominant origin because they did not sample spatial scales that were sufficiently large to distinguish between these two possibilities. Here we report a measurement of the anisotropy power spectrum from subarcminute to one-degree angular scales, and find the clustering amplitude to be larger than predicted by the models based on the two existing explanations. As the shot-noise level of the power spectrum is consistent with that expected from faint galaxies, a new source population on the sky is not necessary to explain the observations. However, a physical mechanism that increases the clustering amplitude is needed. Motivated by recent results related to the extended stellar light profile in dark-matter haloes, we consider the possibility that the fluctuations originate from intrahalo stars of all galaxies. We find that the measured power spectrum can be explained by an intrahalo light fraction of 0.07 to 0.2 per cent relative to the total luminosity in dark-matter haloes of 10(9) to 10(12) solar masses at redshifts of about 1 to 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cooray, Asantha -- Smidt, Joseph -- De Bernardis, Francesco -- Gong, Yan -- Stern, Daniel -- Ashby, Matthew L N -- Eisenhardt, Peter R -- Frazer, Christopher C -- Gonzalez, Anthony H -- Kochanek, Christopher S -- Kozlowski, Szymon -- Wright, Edward L -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 25;490(7421):514-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11474.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA. acooray@uci.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23099405" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-01-28
    Description: We report the discovery of ASASSN-15lh (SN 2015L), which we interpret as the most luminous supernova yet found. At redshift z = 0.2326, ASASSN-15lh reached an absolute magnitude of Mu ,AB = -23.5 +/- 0.1 and bolometric luminosity Lbol = (2.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(45) ergs s(-1), which is more than twice as luminous as any previously known supernova. It has several major features characteristic of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), whose energy sources and progenitors are currently poorly understood. In contrast to most previously known SLSNe-I that reside in star-forming dwarf galaxies, ASASSN-15lh appears to be hosted by a luminous galaxy (MK approximately -25.5) with little star formation. In the 4 months since first detection, ASASSN-15lh radiated (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(52) ergs, challenging the magnetar model for its engine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dong, Subo -- Shappee, B J -- Prieto, J L -- Jha, S W -- Stanek, K Z -- Holoien, T W-S -- Kochanek, C S -- Thompson, T A -- Morrell, N -- Thompson, I B -- Basu, U -- Beacom, J F -- Bersier, D -- Brimacombe, J -- Brown, J S -- Bufano, F -- Chen, Ping -- Conseil, E -- Danilet, A B -- Falco, E -- Grupe, D -- Kiyota, S -- Masi, G -- Nicholls, B -- Olivares E, F -- Pignata, G -- Pojmanski, G -- Simonian, G V -- Szczygiel, D M -- Wozniak, P R -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 15;351(6270):257-60. doi: 10.1126/science.aac9613.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100871, China. dongsubo@pku.edu.cn. ; Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101, USA. ; Nucleo de Astronomia de la Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Santiago, Chile. Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago, Chile. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena, Chile. ; Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK. ; Coral Towers Observatory, Cairns, Queensland 4870, Australia. ; INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S.Sofia 78, 95123, Catania, Italy. ; Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, 100871, P. R. China. ; Association Francaise des Observateurs d'Etoiles Variables (AFOEV), Observatoire de Strasbourg 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg, France. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Department of Earth and Space Science, Morehead State University, 235 Martindale Drive, Morehead, KY 40351, USA. ; Variable Star Observers League in Japan (VSOLJ), 7-1 Kitahatsutomi, Kamagaya, Chiba 273-0126, Japan. ; The Virtual Telescope Project, Via Madonna de Loco 47, 03023 Ceccano, Italy. ; Mt Vernon Observatory, 6 Mt Vernon pl, Nelson, New Zealand. ; Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago, Chile. Departamento Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Av. Republica 252, Santiago, Chile. ; Warsaw University Astronomical Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw, Poland. ; Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop B244, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26816375" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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