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  • 1
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; Germany ; TOXICITY ; VOLUME ; TISSUE ; PATIENT ; treatment ; TARGET ; CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; MELANOMA ; MALIGNANT-MELANOMA ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; IMRT ; OF-THE-LITERATURE ; SKULL-BASE ; methods ; survival analysis ; carbon ion radiotherapy ; EVALUATE ; TUMOR-CONTROL ; LOW-GRADE CHONDROSARCOMAS ; ETHMOID SINUS ; intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) ; paranasal sinus carcinoma ; PROGRESSION-FREE SURVIVAL ; SPHENOID SINUSES
    Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mucosal melanoma (MM) of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Patients and Methods: Between January 1999 and September 2004, eight patients with histologically proven MM of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were treated with IMRT. A median dose of 66 Gy was applied to the macroscopic tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]; range, 60-68 Gy) as an integrated boost and a median dose of 59 Gy (range, 54-64 Gy) to the clinical target volume (CTV) with IMRT. Results: Treatment-related toxicity was very mild in most patients. Overall survival was 80% at 5 years. Calculated from treatment with IMRT as primary radiotherapy, survival was 100% at 1 year and 75% at 3 years. After IMRT, local progression-free survival was 71.4% at 1 year and 57.1% at 3 years, respectively. Distant progression-free survival after IMRT was 57.1% at 1 year and 28.6% at 3 years. Conclusion: Local dose escalation with IMRT yields good treatment results with respect to local and distant tumor control as well as survival, while treatment-related toxicity can be minimized
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17294109
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  • 2
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; CLASSIFICATION ; DIAGNOSIS ; VOLUME ; TUMORS ; radiation ; PATIENT ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; treatment ; TARGET ; PROGRESSION ; TUMOR PROGRESSION ; RATES ; MELANOMA ; CARCINOMAS ; adenocarcinoma ; squamous cell carcinoma ; IMRT ; INITIATION ; CELL CARCINOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; methods ; EVALUATE ; survival rate ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; paranasal sinuses ; TUMOR-CONTROL
    Abstract: ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in 46 patients with paranasal sinus tumors with special respect to treatment-related toxicity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We treated 46 patients with histologically proven tumors of the paranasal sinuses with IMRT. Histological classification included squamous cell carcinoma in 6, adenocarcinoma in 8, adenoidcystic carcinoma in 20 and melanoma in 8 patients, respectively.Six patients had been treated with RT during initial therapy after primary diagnosis, and IMRT was performed for the treatment of tumor progression as re-irradiation. RESULTS: Overall survival rates were 96% at 1 year, 90% at 3 years.Calculated from the initiation of IMRT as primary radiotherapy, survival rates at 1 and 3 years were 95% and 80%.In six patients IMRT was performed as re-irradiation, and survival rate calculated from re-irradiation was 63% at 1 year.Local control rates were 85% at 1, 81% at 2 and 49% at 3 years after primary RT and 50% at 1 year after re-irradiation.Distant metastases-free survival in patients treated with IMRT as primary RT was 83% after 1 and 64% after 3 years. For patients treated as primary irradiation with IMRT, the distant control rate was 83% at 1 year and 0% at 2 years.No severe radiation-induced side-effects could be observed. CONCLUSION: IMRT for tumors of the paranasal sinuses is associated with very good tumor control rates. Treatment-related acute and long-term toxicity can be minimized as compared to historical results with conventional RT
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16859556
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