Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of creating bone tuberosities on the mandibular ramus in rats, using a rigid, occlusive. Teflon capsule. The experiment was carried out in 30 rats. The mandibular ramus was exposed bilaterally. On the test side, the periosteum was left covering the lateral surface of the ramus. On the contralateral side (control). the periosteum was elevated from the lateral surface together with the flap. A hemispherical, Teflon capsule was then placed to face the periosteum or the bone surface with its open part before closure of the wound. The healing periods comprised 7–120 days. Histological analysis demonstrated increasing bone fill in the test specimens from 7 to 60 days, and a limited further increase was observed from 60 to 120 days. In the control specimens, limited bone fill was seen within the first month after surgery, but substantial amounts of new bone were produced from 30–120 days. At 120 days, the mean amount of bone obtained in the test specimens was 56%(range 39%-71%) of the total space created by the capsules, and it was 52%(range 32%-85%) in the controls. The amount of newly formed bone was equivalent to a 5–6 times increase of the original width of the mandibular ramus. These findings indicate that a secluded space created by an occlusive barrier adjacent to existing bone or periosteum may be filled out with bone tissue. This may have a great clinical impact in cranial and maxillofacial surgery.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: Aim: To examine in a discriminating capsule model whether denaturation of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) by heating may influence bone formation.Materials and methods: DBM was produced from the long bones of rats. Half the portion of DBM was denatured by heating in distilled water for 20 min at temperatures between 70°C and 90°C. Prior to the study, the destruction of the osteoinductive properties of the DBM was confirmed in three rats following intramuscular implantation. Thirty, 4-month-old, male albino rats of the Wistar strain were used in the study. Following surgical exposure of the mandibular ramus, a hemispherical Teflon capsule (internal diameter=5.0 mm) was placed, with its open part facing the lateral aspect of the ramus. On one side (test side), the capsule was loosely packed with denatured DBM, while on the contralateral side, serving as control, the capsule was loosely packed with the same amount of non-denatured DBM. After healing periods of 30, 60, and 120 days, groups of 10 animals were killed and 40–70 μm thick undecalcified sections of the capsules were produced. Three sections from each specimen, representing the mid-portion of the capsule, were subjected to histological analysis and computer-assisted planimetric measurements.Results: Increasing amounts of newly formed bone were observed in both test and control capsules during the experimental period. At 4 months, the new bone formed in the control capsules occupied 46.7% of the cross-sectional area of the capsules, while it was only 19.1% in the test capsules (P〈0.05).Conclusion: Denaturation of DBM by heating significantly reduces bone formation by guided tissue regeneration.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Copenhagen : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of obtaining bone regeneration in jaw bone defects in rats after coverage of the defects with an occlusive bioresorbable membrane. The experiment was carried out in 31 rats. The mandibular ramus was exposed in both sides and a 2 x 3 mm defect was produced at its lower border. A gutta-percha point was placed to indicate the original level of the border. The defect on one side was covered with a polyhydroxybutyrate resorbable membrane, whereas the contralateral side received no membrane before closure of the wound. Macerated jaw specimens representing 3 and 6 months of healing demonstrated minimal bone fill in the control defects, whereas all test defects healed to or close to the gutta-percha point, indicating the original inferior border of the jaw. The histological analysis demonstrated increasing bone fill in the test specimens from 15–180 days, whereas only 35–40% of the defect area in the control sides was filled with bone after 3–6 months. Ingrowth of muscular. glandular and connective tissue was consistently occurring in the control defects during healing. It can be concluded that selective repopulation of bone defects with bone-forming cells can be ensured by excluding surrounding soft tissues from the wound area with an occlusive bioresorbable membrane.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the bone-forming capacity of the outer (fibrous) and inner (cambium) layer of the mandibular periosteum in skeletally mature rats. The experiment was carried out in 25 rats. The mandibular ramus was exposed on one side (experimental side) after elevation of a muscle-periosteal flap. A teflon capsule was placed with its opening facing the periosteum at the subsurface of the raised muscle-periosteal flap after suturing. In the contralateral side serving as control, the periosteum of the lateral aspect of the mandibular ramus was left intact. This time the teflon capsule was placed with its opening facing the periosteum left behind at the ramus. The histological analysis demonstrated that in all experimental and control specimens, some bone was produced at 7 days after operation. In the experimental specimens, however, both the incidence and the amount of newly-formed bone in the teflon capsules gradually decreased from 7 to 120 days, while increasing in the control capsules placed over the periosteum. At 120 days, the mean amount of new bone produced in the experimental capsules was 3% (range 0–15%) of the total space created by the capsule, while it was 68% (range 41–85%) for the control capsules. The results demonstrated that substantial amounts of bone can be produced predictably by the placement of an occlusive teflon capsule facing mandibular covered with periosteum. Bone produced from the periosteum and without continuity with existing bone becomes resorbed with time.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objectives: To evaluate in a discriminating “capsule” model whether local application of gentamicin may have an added effect on bone formation produced by Bio-Oss® and guide tissue regeneration (GTR).Material and Methods: Thirty male 3-month-old Wistar rats were used. After elevation of muscle-periosteal flaps, a rigid hemispherical Teflon capsule, loosely packed with 0.025 g of Bio-Oss® impregnated with 2 mg/ml gentamicin sulfate (Garamycin®), was placed with its open part facing the lateral bone surface of the mandibular ramus (test) in one side of the jaw. A capsule filled only with Bio-Oss® (control) was placed on the contralateral side of the jaw. After healing periods of 1, 2 and 4 months, groups of 10 animals were sacrificed and the specimens were processed for histological examination. The volumes of (1) the space created by the capsule, (2) newly formed bone, (3) Bio-Oss® particles, (4) loose connective tissue, and (5) acellular space in the capsule were estimated by a point-counting technique in three to four histological sections of each specimen, taken by uniformly random sampling.Results: The histological evaluation showed limited but increasing bone fill in the capsules from 1 to 4 months in both the test and control sides. After 4 months, the newly formed bone occupied 11.9% (CV: 0.39) of the space created by the capsules at the test sides versus 13.2% (CV: 0.41) at the control sides. There was no statistical significant difference between test and control specimens at any observation time (p〉0.05).Conclusion: It is concluded that local application of gentamicin has no added effect on bone formation when combined with Bio-Oss® and GTR.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Copenhagen : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether it is possible to increase the height of the rat mandible at its inferior border using a bioresorbable membrane adapted to create a secluded space for ingrowth of bone tissue. The experiment was carried out in 18 rats. The mandibular ramus was exposed at both sides. A standardized titanium microimplant was then inserted in the naturally existing curvature at the inferior border of the mandible, serving as a fixed reference and space maker. The mandibular border on one side was covered with a polyhydroxybutyrate bioresorbable membrane, and the contralateral side, serving as control, received no membrane before closure of the wound. The membranes were placed in such a way that a space was created in the curvature between the membrane and the inferior border of the mandible. Macerated jaw specimens representing 6 months of healing demonstrated substantial amounts of bone formation in the curvature of the inferior border of the mandible, resulting in a flattening of the inferior border. Negligible amounts of bone formation had occurred in the control sides. Histological analysis demonstrated that. in 4 of 6 experimental specimens, the space created by the membrane was completely filled with new bone after 6 months of healing, but in some specimens soft tissue seemed to have migrated into the space through ruptures of the membrane or because of poor membrane adaptation at its lateral borders, thereby inhibiting bone formation. Only negligible bone formation had occurred at the control sides. It can be concluded that augmentation of the mandible can be accomplished using a bioresorbable membrane of polyhydroxybutyrate adapted to create a secluded space for ingrowth of bone tissue. but the membrane must be modified regarding its physical properties before clinical use in maxillofacial surgery.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: Aim: To evaluate whether bone formation by guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) can be enhanced by the use of a cell-permeable Teflon barrier allowing the penetration of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells from the surrounding soft tissues.Material and methods: DBM was produced from the long bones of rats, and its bone-inductive properties were tested in three rats prior to the study by intramuscular implantation. Thirty, 4-month-old, male albino rats of the Wistar strain were used. Following surgical exposure of the mandibular ramus, a cell-permeable Teflon capsule, loosely packed with DBM, was placed with its opening facing the lateral surface of the ramus (test side). At the contralateral side, serving as control, a non-perforated (cell-occlusive) Teflon capsule, loosely packed with the same amount of DBM, was placed. After healing periods of 30, 60, and 120 days, groups of 10 animals were killed, and 40–70 μm thick undecalcified sections of the capsules were produced.Results: Computer-assisted planimetric measurements on the histological sections disclosed similar amounts of newly formed bone in both test and control capsules. After 4 months, the new bone in the control capsules occupied 45.0% of the cross-sectional area of the capsule, while it was 50.5% in the test capsules. This difference was not statistically significant (P〈0.05).Conclusion: Similar amounts of bone formed in cell-permeable and cell-occlusive capsules grafted with DBM, suggesting that invasion of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells from the surrounding soft tissues into the barrier-protected area is unnecessary for bone formation with GTR.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Aim:  To evaluate in a discriminating capsule model whether bone formation by guided tissue regeneration (GTR) may be influenced by concomitant implantation of demineralized bone matrix (DBM).Materials and Methods:  Thirty 4-month-old male albino rats of the Wistar strain were used in the study. Following surgical exposure of the mandibular ramus, a hemispherical, Teflon capsule (5.0 mm in diameter), loosely packed with a standardized amount of DBM, was placed with its open part facing the lateral bone surface of the ramus. At the contralateral side, an empty capsule was placed, serving as control. After healing periods of 15, 30, and 120 days, groups of 10 animals were sacrificed and 40–70 μm thick undecalcified sections of the capsules were produced. In the sections, the cross-sectional areas of (1) the space created by the capsule, (2) newly formed bone, (3) DBM particles, (4) loose connective tissue as well as the (5) height of the capsules, and (6) that of the newly formed bone were measured.Results:  Increasing bone fill was observed in both test and control sites from 30 to 120 days. After 30 days of healing, the mean amount of bone was approx. 3% of the cross-sectional area of the capsules at the test sites while it was 8% in the control sites (p〈0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between the test (46%) and control (64%) sites after 120 days regarding any of the measured parameters (p〉0.05). The newly formed bone in the DBM group at 120 days, on the other hand, appeared more dense than that in the control capsules.Conclusion:  DBM used as an adjunct to GTR did not provide any added effect on bone formation but increased the density of the newly formed bone.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objectives: To evaluate whether Bio-Oss® used as an adjunct to guided tissue regeneration (GTR) improves the healing of 1- or 2-wall intrabony defects as compared with GTR alone, and to examine whether impregnation of Bio-Oss® with gentamicin may have an added effect.Material and methods: Sixty patients, with at least one interproximal intrabony defect with probing pocket depth (PPD) 〈inlineGraphic alt="geqslant R: gt-or-equal, slanted" extraInfo="nonStandardEntity" href="urn:x-wiley:03036979:JCPE258:ges" location="ges.gif"/〉7 mm and radiographic evidence of an intrabony component (IC) 〈inlineGraphic alt="geqslant R: gt-or-equal, slanted" extraInfo="nonStandardEntity" href="urn:x-wiley:03036979:JCPE258:ges" location="ges.gif"/〉4 mm, were treated at random with either a resorbable membrane (GTR), a resorbable membrane in combination with Bio-Oss® impregnated with saline (DBB−), a resorbable membrane in combination with Bio-Oss® impregnated with gentamicin (DBB+), or with flap surgery (RBF).Results: All treatment modalities resulted in statistically significant clinical improvements after 1 year. Defects treated with GTR alone presented a probing attachment level (PAL) gain of 2.9 mm, a residual PPD (PPD12) of 4.9 mm, a radiographic bone level (RBL) gain of 3.1 mm, and a residual IC (IC12) of 2.7 mm. GTR combined with Bio-Oss® did not improve the healing outcome (PAL gain: 2.5 mm; PPD12: 4.9 mm; RBL gain: 2.8 mm; IC12: 3.3 mm). Impregnation of the Bio-Oss® with gentamicin 2% mg/ml resulted in clinical improvements (PAL gain: 3.8 mm; PPD12: 4.2 mm; RBL gain: 4.7 mm; IC12: 2.1 mm), superior to those of the other treatment modalities, but the difference was not statistically significant. Defects treated with only flap surgery showed the most inferior clinical response (PAL gain: 1.5 mm; PPD12: 5.1 mm; RBL gain: 1.2 mm; IC12: 4.2 mm) of all groups.Conclusion: The results failed to demonstrate an added effect of Bio-Oss® implantation in combination with GTR on the healing of deep interproximal 1- or 2-wall, or combined 1- and 2-wall intrabony defects compared with GTR alone. Local application of gentamicin, on the other hand, improved the treatment outcome but not to an extent that it was statistically significant.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...