Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Agriculture ; Microbial ecology ; Microbial genetics ; Microbial genomics ; Mycology ; Life sciences ; Microbial ecology ; Mycology ; Agriculture ; Microbial Genetics and Genomics ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Running hot and cold: recombination around and within mating type loci of fungi and other eukaryotes -- Ecological Biogeography of Lichen-forming Fungi -- The bright and dark sides of fungal life -- Disturbance in Natural Ecosystems: Scaling from Fungal Diversity to Ecosystem Functioning -- Fungi and Industrial Pollutants -- Plant cell wall polymer Degradation Strategies of fungi -- Evolution in heritable bacterial-fungal endosymbioses -- An emerging interdisciplinary field: Fungal Bacterial Interactions -- Lichen - bacterial interactions -- Mycorrhizal fungi and the soil carbon and nutrient cycling -- Understanding the Biodiversity and Functions of Root Fungal Endophytes: the ascomycete Harpophora oryzae as a model case -- Ecological genomics of mycotrophic fungi -- Nematophagous Fungi -- Beetles vs. fungi: trophic interactions in boreal forests
    Abstract: This volume provides insights into current research on fungal populations, communities and their interactions with other organisms. It focuses on fungal responses to the physical environment; interactions with bacteria, other fungi, invertebrates and plants; the role of fungi in ecosystem processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling; and aspects of biogeography and conservation. Since the publication of the second edition of Volume IV in 2007, the massive use of €œómicś€ methods has revolutionized our understanding of fungal lifestyles. Highlighting these advances, the third edition has been completely updated and revised. Several chapters deal with various applications of genomics and transcriptomics in biological pest control, as well as interactions with other living systems. This is an invaluable source of information both for scientists who wish to update their knowledge of current advances and for graduate students interested in obtaining a comprehensive introduction to this field of research
    Pages: XIX, 291 p. 40 illus., 25 illus. in color. : online resource.
    Edition: 3rd ed. 2016.
    ISBN: 9783319295329
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Biochemical engineering ; Genetic Engineering ; Systems Biology ; Biomaterials ; Life sciences ; Systems Biology ; Biochemical engineering ; Biomaterials ; Genetic Engineering ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Xenobiotic life (artificial cells and cell like structures, biological nanostructures, XNA) -- Novel DNA and RNA (synthetic promoters, riboswitches, small RNAs, ribozymes, adaptamers, DNA walker, DNA machines) -- Expansion of the genetic code and protein building blocks (orthogonal mRNA-ribosome pairs, non canonical amino acids) -- DNA logics and circuit design (including sensors, TALORs, genome rewiring repressilator, oscillator, metabolator, „Multicellular circuits“) -- Protein engineering (directed evolution, domain engineering) -- Synthetic metabolic pathways (engineered pathways, non natural pathways, scaffolding) -- Reengineered chassis cells (minimal organisms, platform hosts, minimal genomes, synthetic genomes) -- In silico simulation and design of complex metabolic and signalling networks -- Novel synthetic biomaterials -- Key methods for synthetic biology (assembly technologies, genome engineering technologies, DNA synthesis, Standardization) -- Public awareness and risk management
    Abstract: The emerging℗ field of synthetic biology employs biotechnological approaches to recreate and enhance basic biological structures, intracellular processes and whole organisms. This book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the opportunities and challenges of this complex field of biotechnology, which combines various scientific disciplines. It addresses a broad range of topics, including redesigning complex metabolic pathways, DNA/RNA and protein engineering, as well as novel synthetic biomaterials. It discusses both ́€œbottom uṕ€ and ́€œtop dowń€ approaches and presents the latest genome engineering tools with predictions about how these could change our way of thinking and working. Since the use of synthetic biology raises a number of ethical questions, a chapter is devoted to public awareness and risk management. The book is of interest to scientists from both academia and industry, as well as PhD students and postdocs working in the field
    Pages: VII, 368 p. 152 illus., 32 illus. in color. : online resource.
    Edition: 1st ed. 2016.
    ISBN: 9783319227085
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Microbiology ; Microbial genetics ; Plant Diseases ; Soil conservation ; Life sciences ; Microbial Genetics and Genomics ; Plant Pathology ; Applied Microbiology ; Soil Science & Conservation ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Genomic contributions to the study of soil and plant-interacting fungi -- Fungal genomics for energy and environment -- Advancement of functional genomics of a model species of Neurospora and its use for ecological genomics of soil fungi -- Major Plant Pathogens of the Magnaporthaceae Family -- Aspergillus - Genomics of a cosmopolitan fungus -- Trichoderma – genomic aspects of mycoparasitism and biomass degradation -- Fusarium oxysporum: A "moving" view of pathogenicity -- Genomics and spectroscopy provide novel insights into the mechanisms of litter decomposition and nitrogen assimilation by ectomycorrhizal fungi -- Cochliobolus heterostrophus, a Dothideomycete pathogen of maize -- Penicillum chrysogenum - the genomics of antibiotics production -- Rhizopus oryzae - genetic secrets of an emerging human pathogen -- Podospora anserina: from laboratory to biotechnology -- Recent advances on the genomics of litter- and soil-inhabiting Agaricomycetes -- Archaeorhizomycetes, patterns of distribution and abundance in soil -- Methods in Fungal Genetics
    Abstract: This volume addresses the similarities and also the differences in the genomes of soil saprophytes, symbionts, and plant pathogens by using examples of fungal species to illustrate particular principles. It analyzes how the specific interactions with the hosts and the influence of the environment may have shaped genome evolution. The relevance of fungal genetic research and biotechnological applications is shown for areas such as plant pathogenesis, biomass degradation, litter decomposition, nitrogen assimilation, antibiotic production, mycoparasitism, energy, ecology, and also for soil fungi turning to human pathogens. In addition to the model organisms Neurospora and Aspergillus, the following species are covered providing a view of pathogens and mutualists: Trichoderma, Fusarium oxysporum, Cochliobolus heterostrophus, Penicillium chrysogenum, Rhizopus oryzae, Podospora anserina, and species belonging to Agaricomycetes, Archaeorhizomycetes and Magnaporthaceae. Ecology and potential applications have guided the choice of fungal genes to be studied and it will be fascinating to follow the trends of future sequencing projects
    Pages: XII, 388 p. 42 illus., 25 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9783642393396
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Trichoderma reesei ; Homologous transformation ; pyrG ; Vector integration
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary The Trichoderma reesei orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase gene was isolated by heterologous hybridization with the corresponding Neurospora gene as a probe. A 2.7 kb SalI fragment, which exclusively hybridized to the Neurospora gene, was subcloned in pGEM-5Zf(+). This subclone was termed pFG1 and was used to transform a Trichoderma reesei pyrG- negative mutant to PYR+. The transformation frequency in this homologous system was up to 12000 transformants per μg DNA. About one-fifth of the transformants tested were abortive. Perfect mitotic stability was found in half of the non-abortive transformants, correlating with vector integration at homologous and ectopic loci. In the unstable transformants the transforming DNA appears to be present in the form of extrachromosomal elements.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: DNA fingerprinting of Trichoderma ; Trichoderma reesei ; RFLP ; Strain classification
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary We have analyzed nine different species of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma and three strains of T. reesei for the presence of hypervariable loci in their genomes by hybridization with simple repeat oligonucleotides [(CT)8, (GTG)5, and (GACA)4]. On the basis of the DNA-fingerprints obtained, the Trichoderma aggregate is re-classified into five groups: I (T. reesei, T. todica), II (T. polysporum, T. longibrachiatum, T. koningii, and T. pseudokoningii), III (T. virgatum), IV (T. saturnisporum) and V (T. harzianum). These results contradict the claim that T. reesei is a subspecies of T. longibrachiatum. Furthermore, hybridization with (CA)8 allowed a subdivision of group II, wherein T. pseudokoningii formed a subgroup, IIb, which is highly homologous with, but distinct from subgroup IIa. The results show that RFLP analysis may be used to re-classify the Trichoderma aggregate.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Trichoderma reesei ; Cellobiohydrolase genes ; Cellulase formation ; Trichoderma sp
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Eight different species of Trichoderma (T. virgatum, T. longibrachiatum, T. harzianum, T. pseudokoningii, T. polysporum, T. koningii, T. todica, T. saturnisporum), and three strains of T. reesei [QM 6a (wildtype), QM 9123 and QM 9414 (derived mutants)] were found to contain single copies of the cellobiohydrolase genes cbh1 and cbh2 in their genome. This was demonstrated by hybridization of the respective chromosomal DNAs with the corresponding gene fragments of T. reesei QM 9414. According to the relative position of cbh1 and cbh2 in Southern blots, T. harzianum, T. virgatum and T. saturnisporum were clearly distinguishable as unique species. Despite the presence of both cbh genes, these species did not form detectable cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I or II, or exhibit any cellulase activity. All other taxa were identical with respect to the genomic position of cbh1, formed two groups with respect to the position of cbh2, and produced varying amounts of CBH I and II. In all cases CBH I and II production correlated with the relative amount of cbh1- and cbh2-mRNA found. This was particularly true for the three strains of T. reesei, which secreted different amounts of CBH I and II, their efficiency to transcribe cbh1 and cbh2 having been increased as a result of mutation for higher cellulase production.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: DNA-protein interactions ; Trichoderma reseei ; cbh2 promoter ; β-glucuronidase
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract A 613-bp fragment of the 5′ upstream region of the Trichoderma reesei cbh2 gene (coding for the cellulolytic enzyme cellobiohydrolase II) has been isolated and sequenced. Fusion of this fragment to the E. coli uidA gene (coding for β-glucuronidase) leads to-albeit low-expression of β-glucuronidase activity in the presence of cellulose and upon the addition of low molecular weight inducers (sophorose, lactose) of cellobiohydrolase II. It also governed the formation of β-glucuronidase activity during sporulation and its transport to the conidial surface. However, despite the presence of a signal peptide in the cbh2:uidA fusion, β-glucuronidase was not secreted in T. reesei. Defined fragments of the 613-bp promoter region were isolated and used to identify areas involved in the regulation of cbh2 expression by protein-DNA binding assays. At least two binding areas-between-443/-363 and-363/-173, respectively-were identified. In both areas, the DNA-protein complex observed was appreciably larger when cell-free extracts from sophorose-induced mycelia were used. This suggests that at least one of the proteins regulating cbh2 transcription is itself induced by cellulose.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Key wordsTrichoderma (harzianum) ; Mycoparasitism ; Chitin ; N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase ; Gene cloning
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract A 72-kDa N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase was purified from the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma harzianum P1; antibodies were raised against it, and aa-sequences were obtained. The antibody reacted with a single 72-kDa protein band in culture filtrates of T. harzianum grown on chitin, and was subsequently used to clone the corresponding nag1 gene from a λgt11 cDNA expression library. It was interrupted by two short introns and encoded a protein of 580 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence contained aa-sequence areas of high similarity to N-acetyl-glucosaminidases from other eukaryotes such as Candida albicans, and invertebrate and vertebrate animal tissues. The highest similarity was observed with the corresponding gene from the silkworm. The aa-sequence of a tryptic fragment of purified N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase from T. harzianum corresponded to a deduced aa sequence from a portion of the cloned gene, thus verifying that the protein is encoded by nag 1. Southern analysis showed that nag 1 is present as a single-copy gene in T. harzianum. Expression of nag1-mRNA was strongly induced upon growth on chitin, N-acetyl-glucosamine and the cell walls of Botrytis cinerea used as a carbon source. The appearance of the corresponding N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase protein, as determined by Western analysis, paralleled the pattern of nag 1 expression, thereby suggesting that its formation is regulated at the level of transcription.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Trichoderma reesei ; Transformation ; Hygromycin B ; Hygromycin B phosphotransferase ; Pyruvate Kinase ; Promoter ; Terminator ; Dominant selection marker
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Trichoderma reesei was transformed to hygromycin B resistance using a novel vector, which contains the E. coli hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene (hph) fused between promoter and terminator elements of the homologous Trichoderma pkil (coding for pyruvate kinase) and cbh2 (coding for cellobiohydrolase II) genes, respectively. Transformation frequencies of over 1800–2500 transformants/μg DNA were obtained, which is a 15–20-fold increase over that with pAN7-1, which contains hph between A. nidulans expression signals. Mitotically-stable transformants contained the hph gene and the regulatory sequences of the pkil promoter and the cbh2 terminator integrated into the genome. Evidence for preferentially ectopic integration is given.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    ISSN: 1432-0614
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Summary A filter paper surface cultivation method (previously described as a tool for strain selection by Röhr et al. 1979) was adopted as a cultivation system for citric acid production on a small scale and compared with submerged cultivation. Citric acid production in the submerged system was optimal at defined low concentrations of zinc, ferrous and manganese ions, defined phosphate and nitrogen concentrations and within a defined initial pH. In constrast, citric acid production in the filter paper system was not at all influenced by any of these variables. On the other hand, optimal citrate production in both systems required a high (10%–14%, w/v) sucrose concentration. This identifies sugar concentration as a most significant parameter for citrate production, whereas all other nutritional effects are related to the cultivation system used.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...