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  • 1
    Abstract: Polyphenols have been shown to exert biological activity in experimental models of colon cancer; however, human data linking specific polyphenols to colon cancer is limited. We assessed the relationship between pre-diagnostic plasma polyphenols and colon cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Using high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, we measured concentrations of 35 polyphenols in plasma from 809 incident colon cancer cases and 809 matched controls. We used multivariable adjusted conditional logistic regression models that included established colon cancer risk factors. The false discovery rate (qvalues ) was computed to control for multiple comparisons. All statistical tests were two-sided. After false discovery rate correction and in continuous log2 -transformed multivariable models, equol (odds ratio [OR] per log2 -value, 0.86, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]=0.79-0.93; qvalue =0.01) and homovanillic acid (OR per log2 -value, 1.46, 95%CI=1.16-1.84; qvalue =0.02) were associated with colon cancer risk. Comparing extreme fifths, equol concentrations were inversely associated with colon cancer risk (OR=0.61, 95%CI=0.41-0.91, ptrend =0.003), while homovanillic acid concentrations were positively associated with colon cancer development (OR=1.72, 95%CI=1.17-2.53, ptrend 〈0.0001). No heterogeneity for these associations was observed by sex and across other colon cancer risk factors. The remaining polyphenols were not associated with colon cancer risk. Higher equol concentrations were associated with lower risk, and higher homovanillic acid concentrations were associated with greater risk, of colon cancer. These findings support a potential role for specific polyphenols in colon tumorigenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Type of Publication: Journal article epub ahead of print
    PubMed ID: 29696648
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  • 2
    Keywords: COHORT ; RISK ; INTERVENTION ; HEALTH ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; MEN ; COLON-CANCER ; dietary fiber ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PRODUCTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer. Because whole-grain intake estimation might be prone to measurement errors, more objective measures (eg, biomarkers) could assist in investigating such associations. METHODS: The association between alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain rye and wheat intake, and colorectal cancer incidence were investigated using prediagnostic plasma samples from colorectal cancer case patients and matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We included 1372 incident colorectal cancer case patients and 1372 individual matched control subjects and calculated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for overall and anatomical subsites of colorectal cancer using conditional logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. Regional differences (Scandinavia, the Mediterranean, Central Europe) were also explored. RESULTS: High plasma total alkylresorcinol concentration was associated with lower incidence of distal colon cancer; the adjusted incidence rate ratio of distal colon cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of plasma total alkylresorcinols was 0.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28 to 0.83). An inverse association between plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations and colon cancer was found for Scandinavian participants (IRR per doubling = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98). However, plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations were not associated with overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, or rectal cancer. Plasma alkylresorcinols concentrations were associated with colon and distal colon cancer only in Central Europe and Scandinavia (ie, areas where alkylresorcinol levels were higher). CONCLUSIONS: High concentrations of plasma alkylresorcinols were associated with a lower incidence of distal colon cancer but not with overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, and rectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24317181
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  • 3
    Keywords: GENE ; TRIAL ; prevention ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; SELENOPROTEIN-P ; adenoma ; SERUM SELENIUM ; VITAMIN ; HUMAN HEALTH
    Abstract: Suboptimal intakes of the micronutrient selenium (Se) are found in many parts of Europe. Low Se status may contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) development. We assessed Se status by measuring serum levels of Se and Selenoprotein P (SePP) and examined the association with CRC risk in a nested case-control design (966 CRC cases; 966 matched controls) within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Se was measured by total reflection X-ray fluorescence and SePP by immunoluminometric sandwich assay. Multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Respective mean Se and SePP levels were 84.0 mug/L and 4.3 mg/L in cases and 85.6 mug/L and 4.4 mg/L in controls. Higher Se concentrations were associated with a non-significant lower CRC risk (IRR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82-1.03 per 25 mug/L increase). However, sub-group analyses by sex showed a statistically significant association for women (p(trend) = 0.032; per 25 mug/L Se increase, IRR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.97) but not for men. Higher SePP concentrations were inversely associated with CRC risk (p(trend) = 0.009; per 0.806 mg/L increase, IRR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82-0.98) with the association more apparent in women (p(trend) = 0.004; IRR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.72-0.94 per 0.806 mg/L increase) than men (p(trend) = 0.485; IRR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.86-1.12 per 0.806 mg/L increase). The findings indicate that Se status is suboptimal in many Europeans and suggest an inverse association between CRC risk and higher serum Se status, which is more evident in women.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25042282
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK-FACTORS ; DISCOVERY ; NMR ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; CIRRHOSIS ; FATTY LIVER-DISEASE ; metabonomics ; IDENTIFY SERUM BIOMARKERS ; TISSUE METABOLOMICS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most prevalent form of liver cancer, is difficult to diagnose and has limited treatment options with a low survival rate. Aside from a few key risk factors, such as hepatitis, high alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, and diabetes, there is incomplete etiologic understanding of the disease and little progress in identification of early risk biomarkers. METHODS: To address these aspects, an untargeted nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic approach was applied to pre-diagnostic serum samples obtained from first incident, primary HCC cases (n = 114) and matched controls (n = 222) identified from amongst the participants of a large European prospective cohort. RESULTS: A metabolic pattern associated with HCC risk comprised of perturbations in fatty acid oxidation and amino acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism was observed. Sixteen metabolites of either endogenous or exogenous origin were found to be significantly associated with HCC risk. The influence of hepatitis infection and potential liver damage was assessed, and further analyses were made to distinguish patterns of early or later diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Our results show clear metabolic alterations from early stages of HCC development with application for better etiologic understanding, prevention, and early detection of this increasingly common cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26399231
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  • 5
    Abstract: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Studies on weight cycling and the risk of type 2 diabetes have revealed inconsistent results, possibly due to differences in the definition of weight fluctuations. Here, we investigated whether weight cycling during adulthood is related to diabetes risk in a large cohort study, using a complementary approach to define patterns of weight development. METHODS: Weight cycling, weight loss and weight gain were defined (1) a priori, using distinct categories, and (2) by functional principal component analysis (FPCA) to capture weight patterns in greater detail. Associations of weight cycling, weight loss and weight gain with the risk of type 2 diabetes were evaluated by Cox regression models. RESULTS: A priori defined weight cycling was associated with increased diabetes risk, compared with stable weight (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.09, 1.68]). No significant association between FPCA-derived weight cycling and risk of diabetes was observed after adjustment for concurrent weight patterns (HR 1.19 [95% CI 0.89, 1.60]). Subgroup analyses showed that FPCA-derived weight cycling during net weight gain was associated with a higher risk of diabetes (HR 1.68 [95% CI 1.14, 2.48]). A priori defined weight gain (HR 2.08 [95% CI 1.60, 2.70]) was more clearly related to the risk of diabetes than FPCA-derived weight gain (HR 1.20 [95% CI 0.95, 1.51]), while no significant associations were observed for weight loss. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Overall, weight cycling may not be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes when accounting for concurrent patterns of weight development. However, weight cycling may pose a stronger risk of diabetes than non-cycling during net weight gain.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26376796
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  • 6
    Keywords: PROTEIN ; RESOLUTION ; DYNAMICS ; MOBILITY ; NUCLEUS ; LIVING CELLS ; ANOMALOUS DIFFUSION ; FLUORESCENCE RECOVERY ; LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES
    Abstract: We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21886771
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK-FACTORS ; WOMEN ; POLYPHENOLS ; nutrition ; LIFE-STYLE ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; US MEN ; Food sources
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE To study the association between dietary flavonoid and lignan intakes, and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes among European populations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-InterAct case-cohort study included 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 participants from among 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up in eight European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid and lignan food composition database was developed from the Phenol-Explorer, the U.K. Food Standards Agency, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) from country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS In multivariable models, a trend for an inverse association between total flavonoid intake and type 2 diabetes was observed (HR for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.90 [95% CI 0.77-1.04]; P value trend = 0.040), but not with lignans (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.72-1.07]; P value trend = 0.119). Among flavonoid subclasses, flavonols (HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.69-0.95]; P value trend = 0.020) and flavanols (HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68-0.99]; P value trend = 0.012), including flavan-3-ol monomers (HR 0.73 [95% CI 0.57-0.93]; P value trend = 0.029), were associated with a significantly reduced hazard of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Prospective findings in this large European cohort demonstrate inverse associations between flavonoids, particularly flavanols and flavonols, and incident type 2 diabetes. This suggests a potential protective role of eating a diet rich in flavonoids, a dietary pattern based on plant-based foods, in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24130345
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  • 8
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; CALCIUM ; nutrition ; CHRONIC HEPATITIS ; PARTICIPANTS ; D DEFICIENCY ; 25-hydroxyvitamin D ; CHRONIC LIVER-DISEASE ; SEVERE FIBROSIS
    Abstract: The association between vitamin D status and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been well investigated, despite experimental evidence supporting an important role of vitamin D in liver pathophysiology. Our objective was to investigate the association between prediagnostic circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] serum levels and the risk of HCC in a prospective, nested case-control study among 520,000 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Each case (n = 138) diagnosed between 1992 and 2010 was matched to one control by age, sex, study center, date and time of blood collection, and fasting status. Serum baseline levels of 25(OH)D were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Multivariable incident rate ratios (IRRs) of HCC associated with continuous (per 10 nmol/L) or categorical levels (tertiles or a priori-defined categories) of prediagnostic 25(OH)D were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a 49% reduction in the risk of HCC (highest versus lowest tertile: multivariable IRR = 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26 to 0.99; Ptrend = 0.04; per 10 nmol/L increase: IRR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.68-0.94). The finding did not vary substantially by time from enrolment to diagnosis, and did not change after adjustment for biomarkers of preexisting liver damage, nor chronic infection with hepatitis B or C viruses. The findings were not modified by body size or smoking status. CONCLUSION: In this prospective study on western European populations, serum levels of 25(OH)D were inversely associated with the risk of HCC. Given the rising incidence of this cancer in low-risk developed countries and the strong public health interest surrounding the potentially cancer-protective roles of vitamin D, additional studies in different populations are required.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24644045
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  • 9
  • 10
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Combinations of multiple fatty acids may influence cardiometabolic risk more than single fatty acids. The association of a combination of fatty acids with incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) has not been evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We measured plasma phospholipid fatty acids by gas chromatography in 27,296 adults, including 12,132 incident cases of T2D, over the follow-up period between baseline (1991-1998) and 31 December 2007 in 8 European countries in EPIC-InterAct, a nested case-cohort study. The first principal component derived by principal component analysis of 27 individual fatty acids (mole percentage) was the main exposure (subsequently called the fatty acid pattern score [FA-pattern score]). The FA-pattern score was partly characterised by high concentrations of linoleic acid, stearic acid, odd-chain fatty acids, and very-long-chain saturated fatty acids and low concentrations of gamma-linolenic acid, palmitic acid, and long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids, and it explained 16.1% of the overall variability of the 27 fatty acids. Based on country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random-effects meta-analysis, the FA-pattern score was associated with lower incident T2D. Comparing the top to the bottom fifth of the score, the hazard ratio of incident T2D was 0.23 (95% CI 0.19-0.29) adjusted for potential confounders and 0.37 (95% CI 0.27-0.50) further adjusted for metabolic risk factors. The association changed little after adjustment for individual fatty acids or fatty acid subclasses. In cross-sectional analyses relating the FA-pattern score to metabolic, genetic, and dietary factors, the FA-pattern score was inversely associated with adiposity, triglycerides, liver enzymes, C-reactive protein, a genetic score representing insulin resistance, and dietary intakes of soft drinks and alcohol and was positively associated with high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and intakes of polyunsaturated fat, dietary fibre, and coffee (p 〈 0.05 each). Limitations include potential measurement error in the fatty acids and other model covariates and possible residual confounding. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of individual fatty acids, characterised by high concentrations of linoleic acid, odd-chain fatty acids, and very long-chain fatty acids, was associated with lower incidence of T2D. The specific fatty acid pattern may be influenced by metabolic, genetic, and dietary factors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29020051
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