Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; STEM-CELLS ; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; neuroblastoma ; N-MYC ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR
    Abstract: Previous studies have evaluated the role of miRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. MiR-34a was found to be downregulated in several tumors, including medulloblastomas. Here we employed targeted transgenesis to analyze the function of miR-34a in vivo. We generated mice with a constitutive deletion of the miR-34a gene. These mice were devoid of mir-34a expression in all analyzed tissues, but were viable and fertile. A comprehensive standardized phenotypic analysis including more than 300 single parameters revealed no apparent phenotype. Analysis of miR-34a expression in human medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines revealed significantly lower levels than in normal human cerebellum. Re-expression of miR-34a in human medulloblastoma cells reduced cell viability and proliferation, induced apoptosis and downregulated the miR-34a target genes, MYCN and SIRT1. Activation of the Shh pathway by targeting SmoA1 transgene overexpression causes medulloblastoma in mice, which is dependent on the presence and upregulation of Mycn. Analysis of miR-34a in medulloblastomas derived from ND2:SmoA1(tg) mice revealed significant suppression of miR-34a compared to normal cerebellum. Tumor incidence was significantly increased and tumor formation was significantly accelerated in mice transgenic for SmoA1 and lacking miR-34a. Interestingly, Mycn and Sirt1 were strongly expressed in medulloblastomas derived from these mice. We here demonstrate that miR-34a is dispensable for normal development, but that its loss accelerates medulloblastomagenesis. Strategies aiming to re-express miR-34a in tumors could, therefore, represent an efficient therapeutic option. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25348795
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; INVASION ; chemotherapy ; FEATURES ; STAGING SYSTEM ; CHILDREN RECEIVING CARBOPLATIN ; UNILATERAL RETINOBLASTOMA ; ORBITAL RETINOBLASTOMA ; OTOTOXICITY
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Retinoblastoma can extend beyond the structures of the eye, where cells can enter the bloodstream and cause metastases. Various types of protocols for adjuvant treatment risk-adapted according to histopathological risk factors are used worldwide. METHODS: Between 1997 and 2009, 420 children were diagnosed with retinoblastoma at the German Retinoblastoma Referral Centre and risk factors were assessed. Patients with post-laminar optic nerve infiltration or choroid or minor scleral invasion received six courses of adjuvant chemotherapy using vincristine, etoposide, carboplatin and cyclophosphamide (group 1). Patients with microscopic extension beyond the sclera to the resection margin of the optic nerve or potential spread due to vitrectomy received chemotherapy plus orbital radiotherapy (group 2). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was performed in patients with local extraocular invasion detected on MRI. RESULTS: Following this protocol, 42 of the 420 patients and 21 referred from other centres showed high-risk histopathological factors qualifying for adjuvant therapy (57 in group 1 and 6 in group 2). Seven of the 63 patients received neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment. During a mean follow-up of 5.8 (range 0.4-15.4) years, one of six patients in group 2 developed metastases and died. No patients died from toxicity. The 5-year overall survival was 100% for group 1 and 80% for group 2. CONCLUSIONS: This retrospective single-site study reveals a 10% incidence of high-risk features in children with retinoblastoma diagnosed at the German Retinoblastoma Referral Centre. Overall survival rates of 98.3% underline the safety of this adjuvant chemotherapy protocol and its efficiency in preventing metastasis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25583279
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: The systemic and resistant nature of metastatic neuroblastoma renders it largely incurable with current multimodal treatment. Clinical progression stems mainly from the increasing burden of metastatic colonization. Therapeutically inhibiting the migration-invasion-metastasis cascade would be of great benefit, but the mechanisms driving this cycle are as yet poorly understood. In-depth transcriptome analyses and ChIP-qPCR identified the cell surface glycoprotein, CD9, as a major downstream player and direct target of the recently described GRHL1 tumor suppressor. CD9 is known to block or facilitate cancer cell motility and metastasis dependent upon entity. High-level CD9 expression in primary neuroblastomas correlated with patient survival and established markers for favorable disease. Low-level CD9 expression was an independent risk factor for adverse outcome. MYCN and HDAC5 colocalized to the CD9 promoter and repressed transcription. CD9 expression diminished with progressive tumor development in the TH-MYCN transgenic mouse model for neuroblastoma, and CD9 expression in neuroblastic tumors was far below that in ganglia from wildtype mice. Primary neuroblastomas lacking MYCN amplifications displayed differential CD9 promoter methylation in methyl-CpG-binding domain sequencing analyses, and high-level methylation was associated with advanced stage disease, supporting epigenetic regulation. Inducing CD9 expression in a SH-EP cell model inhibited migration and invasion in Boyden chamber assays. Enforced CD9 expression in neuroblastoma cells transplanted onto chicken chorioallantoic membranes strongly reduced metastasis to embryonic bone marrow. Combined treatment of neuroblastoma cells with HDAC/DNA methyltransferase inhibitors synergistically induced CD9 expression despite hypoxic, metabolic or cytotoxic stress. Our results show CD9 is a critical and indirectly druggable suppressor of the invasion-metastasis cycle in neuroblastoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27572323
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: AGENTS ; BLOOD ; Germany ; PERFUSION ; QUANTIFICATION ; VOLUME ; BLOOD-FLOW ; FLOW ; SIGNAL ; PARAMETERS ; RECRUITMENT ; KINETICS ; BODY ; SONOGRAPHY ; OXYGEN ; POWER DOPPLER SONOGRAPHY ; VASCULARIZATION ; ULTRASOUND-INDUCED DESTRUCTION ; exercise ; RE ; WEIGHT ; HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS ; replenishment kinetics ; TUMOR PERFUSION ; muscle perfusion ; replenishment kinetics of microbubbles ; CAPILLARIES ; microvascular density ; contrast-enhanced sonography
    Abstract: Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare skeletal muscle perfusion measured by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with microvascular density in muscle biopsies. Methods. Power Doppler sonography after intravenous bolus injection of Levovist (SH U 508A; Schering AG, Berlin, Germany) was used to examine perfusion of vastus lateralis muscle in 23 healthy volunteers. Local blood volume (B), blood flow velocity (v), and blood flow (f) were calculated by analyzing replenishment kinetics. CEUS perfusion was compared with vascularization of biopsy samples from vastus lateralis muscle. Subjects were selected such that their aerobic capacity (maximal oxygen uptake [VO(2)max]) per body weight ranged between 23 and 66 mL - min(-1) - kg(-1) to render a large variability of skeletal muscle capillarization. Moreover, subjects' venous blood hematocrit (Hkt) was determined to estimate the plasmatic intravascular volume fraction (1 - Hkt = PVF) in which the microbubbles can distribute. Results. Median capillary density was 331/mm(2) (range, 207-469/mm(2)), and median capillary fiber contacts (CFC) were 3.6 (range, 2.3-6.5). CFC was correlated with VO2max (r= 0.59; P 〈.01). Among CEUS parameters, B showed the closest correlation to CFC (r = 0.53; P 〈.01). When CFC was normalized for PVF, correlation of B to CFC was r = 0.64 (P 〈.01). CEUS could depict the physiologic large variability of vastus lateralis muscle perfusion at rest (median [range]: B, 2.5 [0.1-12.3] similar to mL; v, 0.3 [0.1-3.7] mm/s; f, 0.7 [0.1-5.3] similar to mL - min(-1) - 100 g tissue(-1)). Conclusions. B is significantly related to fiber-adjacent capillarization and may represent physiologic capillary recruitment (eg, through metabolic fiber-related signals). CEUS is feasible for skeletal muscle perfusion quantification
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16632781
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Abstract: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that promotes G2/M-phase transition, is expressed in elevated levels in high-risk neuroblastomas and correlates with unfavorable patient outcome. Recently, we and others have presented PLK1 as a potential drug target for neuroblastoma, and reported that the BI2536 PLK1 inhibitor showed antitumoral actvity in preclinical neuroblastoma models. Here we analyzed the effects of GSK461364, a competitive inhibitor for ATP binding to PLK1, on typical tumorigenic properties of preclinical in vitro and in vivo neuroblastoma models. GSK461364 treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines reduced cell viability and proliferative capacity, caused cell cycle arrest and massively induced apoptosis. These phenotypic consequences were induced by treatment in the low-dose nanomolar range, and were independent of MYCN copy number status. GSK461364 treatment strongly delayed established xenograft tumor growth in nude mice, and significantly increased survival time in the treatment group. These preclinical findings indicate PLK1 inhibitors may be effective for patients with high-risk or relapsed neuroblastomas with upregulated PLK1 and might be considered for entry into early phase clinical trials in pediatric patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28036269
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Abstract: Current therapy of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, achieves 40-70% survival. Secondary chemotherapy resistance contributes to treatment failure, where TP53 pathway dysfunction plays a key role. MDM2 interaction with TP53 leads to its degradation. Reactivating TP53 functionality using small-molecule inhibitors, such as RITA, to disrupt TP53-MDM2 binding may have therapeutic potential. We show here that RITA decreased viability of all 4 analyzed medulloblastoma cell lines, regardless of TP53 functional status. The decrease in cell viability was accompanied in 3 of the 4 medulloblastoma cell lines by accumulation of TP53 protein in the cells and increased CDKN1A expression. RITA treatment in mouse models inhibited medulloblastoma xenograft tumor growth. These data demonstrate that RITA treatment reduces medulloblastoma cell viability in both in vitro and in vivo models, and acts independently of cellular TP53 status, identifying RITA as a potential therapeutic agent to treat medulloblastoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28427187
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...