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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  26. Wissenschaftliche Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Phoniatrie und Pädaudiologie (DGPP); 20090911-20090913; Leipzig; DOC09dgppV12 /20090907/
    Publication Date: 2009-09-07
    Description: Although children with cochlear implants participate in a number of musical activites, little is known about their musical exposition and activities. We adapted the MUMU questionnaire for adults for kids and cover musical experience and exposures in 18 questions. There is a version for ci users and normal hearing subjects. We collected the data of 102 Ci users and 29 normal hearing subjects. The data was analysed with the Chi square test in SPSS. The average age of the CI users was 7.3 (SD 3.9) yrs and 5.5 (SD 3.1) yrs for normal hearing children. The average implant experience was 3.7 (SD 2.7) yrs. 16% of the patients were bilaterally implanted, 84% unilaterally. Distribution of implants was 69% Combi 40/40+/Pulsar; 30% Nucleus 22/24; 1% ABC. 13 CI kids had additional handicaps. Families of hearing impaired rate role music plays in their live less important than those of the normal hearing children, however not significantly so. The overall exposure of music is the same in both groups. However, children with ci are less actively engaged in musical activities. Although cochlear implanted prelingually deaf children are involved in musical activities, they do not develop a spontaneous approach to music to the extent their normal hearing peers do. Families with cochlear implanted children should be encouraged to participate more in musical activities as this is supportive for speech development also in normal hearing subjects.
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  27. Deutscher Krebskongress; 20060322-20060326; Berlin; DOCPO364 /20060320/
    Publication Date: 2006-04-21
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
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  • 3
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  Evidenzbasierte Medizin - Anspruch und Wirklichkeit; 102. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft; 20040923-20040926; Berlin; DOC04dogSA.13.12 /20040922/
    Publication Date: 2004-09-21
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
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  • 4
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  55. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 1. Joint Meeting mit der Ungarischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie; 20040425-20040428; Köln; DOCMI.02.12 /20040423/
    Publication Date: 2004-04-22
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
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  • 5
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  68. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), 7. Joint Meeting mit der Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS); 20170514-20170517; Magdeburg; DOCMO.07.02 /20170609/
    Publication Date: 2017-06-09
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
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  • 6
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  85. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie; 20140528-20140601; Dortmund; DOC14hnod402 /20140414/
    Publication Date: 2014-04-15
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
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  • 7
    Keywords: carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; primary ; METASTASIS ; brain metastases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12486293
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; IONIZING-RADIATION ; proliferation ; CELL ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; KINASE ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; THERAPY ; TYROSINE KINASE ; SUPPORT ; EXPOSURE ; TISSUE ; radiation ; TISSUES ; tumour ; CONTRAST ; cell culture ; culture ; TARGET ; immunohistochemistry ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; EFFICACY ; NETHERLANDS ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMAS ; RECEPTORS ; GLIOMAS ; PERMEABILITY FACTOR ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; TUMOR-GROWTH ; GLIOMA ; anti-angiogenic therapy,glioblastoma multiforme,radiotherapy,VEGF receptor-coexpression ; FACTOR RECEPTOR-1 ; HUMAN GLIOMAS
    Abstract: In tumour-induced angiogenesis of gliomas, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt-1) and kinase-insert-domain-containing receptor (KDR) play a major role and are promising targets for tumour therapy. Nevertheless, preliminary results of such therapies could not prove clinical efficacy and thus make a profound knowledge of VEGF regulation essential. Based on earlier results, which demonstrated an inhibitory influence of VEGF on Flt-1-expressing glioblastoma cells [1], in the present study we focused on the extent of VEGF and VEGF receptor coexpression and possible therapeutical consequences.Protein expression of VEGF, Flt-1 and KDR was analysed by immunohistochemistry in native tumour tissues of 63 glioblastomas. VEGF could be detected in all glioblastomas. Additionally and independently to the expected Flt-1 and KDR expression in tumour endothelia, we found a coexpression of VEGF with Flt-1 in tumour cells of 46 and with KDR in 45 glioblastomas. After exposure of glioblastoma cells to X-ray radiation we observed a strong dose-dependent increase of VEGF secretion in two glioblastoma cell cultures by up to 46% and 96%, respectively that originated from an increased VEGF mRNA expression. In contrast, under the same conditions secretion of HGF/SF was only slightly elevated and bFGF despite being strongly increased remained at very low overall amounts compared to VEGF. Based on previous data on an autocrine function of VEGF in Flt-1-expressing glioblastoma cells we hypothesise that the X-ray radiation induced upregulation of VEGF might result in a downregulation of tumour cell proliferation and thus lead to a reduced sensitivity to radiation therapy. Therefore our results support the idea that a combination of anti-VEGF and radiation therapy might prove a promising new option in fighting against one of the most fatal tumour types
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15015778
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  • 9
    Keywords: brain ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; DISEASE ; LONG-TERM ; TUMORS ; TIME ; PATIENT ; INFECTION ; prognosis ; SKIN ; T cell ; T cells ; T-CELL ; T-CELLS ; cell culture ; culture ; MEMORY ; virus ; NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; NO ; immunohistochemistry ; ASSAY ; NUMBER ; VACCINE ; SAFETY ; CD8(+) ; immune response ; IMMUNE-RESPONSE ; IMMUNITY ; T-LYMPHOCYTES ; vaccination ; T lymphocyte ; side effects ; NEWCASTLE-DISEASE VIRUS ; ESTABLISHMENT ; TUMOR CELLS ; LONG-TERM SURVIVORS ; GLIOMAS ; T lymphocytes ; IMMUNIZATION ; ONCOLOGY ; AUTOLOGOUS TUMOR ; overall survival ; NEWCASTLE-DISEASE-VIRUS ; SURVIVORS
    Abstract: Purpose Prognosis of patients with glioblastoma is poor. Therefore, in glioblastoma patients, we analyzed whether antitumor vaccination with a virus-modified autologous tumor cell vaccine is feasible and safe. Also, we determined the influence on progression-free survival and overall survival and on vaccination-induced antitumor reactivity. Patients and Methods In a nonrandomized study, 23 patients were vaccinated and compared with nonvaccinated controls (n = 87). Vaccine was prepared from patient's tumor cell cultures by infection of the cells with Newcastle Disease Virus, followed by gamma-irradiation, and applied up to eight times. Antitumor immune reactivity was determined in skin, blood, and relapsed tumor by delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction, ELISPOT assay, and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results Establishment of tumor cell cultures was successful in approximately 90% of patients. After vaccination, we observed no severe side effects. The median progression-free survival of vaccinated patients was 40 weeks (v 26 weeks in controls; log-rank test, P =.024), and the median overall survival of vaccinated patients was 100 weeks (v 49 weeks in controls; log-rank test, P 〈.001). Forty-five percent of the controls survived 1 year, 11% survived 2 years, and there were no long-term survivors (greater than or equal to3 years). Ninety-one percent of vaccinated 39% survived 2 years, and 4% were long-term survivors. In the patients survived I year, vaccinated group, immune monitoring revealed significant increases of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactivity, numbers of tumor-reactive memory T cells, and numbers of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes in secondary tumors. Conclusion Postoperative vaccination with virus-modified autologous tumor cells seems to be feasible and safe and to improve the prognosis of patients with gliobiastomas. This could be substantiated by the observed antitumor immune response. (C) 2004 by American Society of Clinical Oncology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15452186
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  • 10
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: -DNA methylation leaves a long-term signature of smoking exposure and is one potential mechanism by which tobacco exposure predisposes to adverse health outcomes, such as cancers, osteoporosis, lung, and cardiovascular disorders. METHODS AND RESULTS: -To comprehensively determine the association between cigarette smoking and DNA methylation, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation assessed using the Illumina BeadChip 450K array on 15,907 blood derived DNA samples from participants in 16 cohorts (including 2,433 current, 6,518 former, and 6,956 never smokers). Comparing current versus never smokers, 2,623 CpG sites (CpGs), annotated to 1,405 genes, were statistically significantly differentially methylated at Bonferroni threshold of p〈1x10-7 (18,760 CpGs at False Discovery Rate (FDR)〈0.05). Genes annotated to these CpGs were enriched for associations with several smoking-related traits in genome-wide studies including pulmonary function, cancers, inflammatory diseases and heart disease. Comparing former versus never smokers, 185 of the CpGs that differed between current and never smokers were significant p〈1x10-7 (2,623 CpGs at FDR〈0.05), indicating a pattern of persistent altered methylation, with attenuation, after smoking cessation. Transcriptomic integration identified effects on gene expression at many differentially methylated CpGs. CONCLUSIONS: -Cigarette smoking has a broad impact on genome-wide methylation that, at many loci, persists many years after smoking cessation. Many of the differentially methylated genes were novel genes with respect to biologic effects of smoking, and might represent therapeutic targets for prevention or treatment of tobacco-related diseases. Methylation at these sites could also serve as sensitive and stable biomarkers of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27651444
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