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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are nucleic acid–sensing receptors and have been implicated in mediating pain and itch. Here we report that Tlr8 –/– mice show normal itch behaviors, but have defects in neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in mice. SNL increased TLR8 expression in small-diameter IB4 + DRG neurons. Inhibition of TLR8 in the DRG attenuated SNL-induced pain hypersensitivity. Conversely, intrathecal or intradermal injection of TLR8 agonist, VTX-2337, induced TLR8-dependent pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, TLR8, localizing in the endosomes and lysosomes, mediated ERK activation, inflammatory mediators’ production, and neuronal hyperexcitability after SNL. Notably, miR-21 was increased in DRG neurons after SNL. Intrathecal injection of miR-21 showed the similar effects as VTX-2337 and inhibition of miR-21 in the DRG attenuated neuropathic pain. The present study reveals a previously unknown role of TLR8 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain, suggesting that miR-21–TLR8 signaling may be potential new targets for drug development against this type of chronic pain.
    Keywords: Neuroinflammation, Neuroscience
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-08-29
    Description: Discovering the structure and dynamics of transcriptional regulatory events in the genome with cellular and temporal resolution is crucial to understanding the regulatory underpinnings of development and disease. We determined the genomic distribution of binding sites for 92 transcription factors and regulatory proteins across multiple stages of Caenorhabditis elegans development by performing 241 ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing) experiments. Integration of regulatory binding and cellular-resolution expression data produced a spatiotemporally resolved metazoan transcription factor binding map. Using this map, we explore developmental regulatory circuits that encode combinatorial logic at the levels of co-binding and co-expression of transcription factors, characterizing the genomic coverage and clustering of regulatory binding, the binding preferences of, and biological processes regulated by, transcription factors, the global transcription factor co-associations and genomic subdomains that suggest shared patterns of regulation, and identifying key transcription factors and transcription factor co-associations for fate specification of individual lineages and cell types.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530805/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530805/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Araya, Carlos L -- Kawli, Trupti -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Jiang, Lixia -- Wu, Beijing -- Vafeados, Dionne -- Terrell, Robert -- Weissdepp, Peter -- Gevirtzman, Louis -- Mace, Daniel -- Niu, Wei -- Boyle, Alan P -- Xie, Dan -- Ma, Lijia -- Murray, John I -- Reinke, Valerie -- Waterston, Robert H -- Snyder, Michael -- R01 GM072675/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004267/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 28;512(7515):400-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13497.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25164749" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Caenorhabditis elegans/cytology/embryology/*genetics/*growth & development ; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins/metabolism ; Cell Lineage ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/*genetics ; Genome, Helminth/*genetics ; Genomics ; Larva/cytology/genetics/growth & development/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; *Spatio-Temporal Analysis ; Transcription Factors/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-03-25
    Description: Although p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis serve as critical barriers to cancer development, emerging evidence suggests that the metabolic activities of p53 are also important. Here we show that p53 inhibits cystine uptake and sensitizes cells to ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death, by repressing expression of SLC7A11, a key component of the cystine/glutamate antiporter. Notably, p53(3KR), an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, fully retains the ability to regulate SLC7A11 expression and induce ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Analysis of mutant mice shows that these non-canonical p53 activities contribute to embryonic development and the lethality associated with loss of Mdm2. Moreover, SLC7A11 is highly expressed in human tumours, and its overexpression inhibits ROS-induced ferroptosis and abrogates p53(3KR)-mediated tumour growth suppression in xenograft models. Our findings uncover a new mode of tumour suppression based on p53 regulation of cystine metabolism, ROS responses and ferroptosis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4455927/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4455927/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Le -- Kon, Ning -- Li, Tongyuan -- Wang, Shang-Jui -- Su, Tao -- Hibshoosh, Hanina -- Baer, Richard -- Gu, Wei -- 2P01CA080058/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 2P01CA097403/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5R01CA166294/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5R01CA169246/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5R01CA172023/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA080058/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA097403/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA085533/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA166294/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA169246/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA172023/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32-CA09503/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 2;520(7545):57-62. doi: 10.1038/nature14344. Epub 2015 Mar 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Cancer Genetics, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 1130 St Nicholas Ave, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 1130 St Nicholas Ave, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Institute for Cancer Genetics, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 1130 St Nicholas Ave, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032, USA [3] Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Physicians &Surgeons, Columbia University 1130 St Nicholas Ave, New York, New York 10032, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25799988" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Transport System y+/biosynthesis/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Biological Transport ; Cell Death ; Cystine/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/embryology/metabolism ; Embryonic Development ; Humans ; Iron/*metabolism ; Mice ; Neoplasms/*metabolism/*pathology ; Oxidative Stress ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2/deficiency/genetics ; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-11-13
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Araya, Carlos L -- Kawli, Trupti -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Jiang, Lixia -- Wu, Beijing -- Vafeados, Dionne -- Terrell, Robert -- Weissdepp, Peter -- Gevirtzman, Louis -- Mace, Daniel -- Niu, Wei -- Boyle, Alan P -- Xie, Dan -- Ma, Lijia -- Murray, John I -- Reinke, Valerie -- Waterston, Robert H -- Snyder, Michael -- England -- Nature. 2015 Dec 3;528(7580):152. doi: 10.1038/nature16075. Epub 2015 Nov 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560031" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-04-07
    Description: Cells receive growth and survival stimuli through their attachment to an extracellular matrix (ECM). Overcoming the addiction to ECM-induced signals is required for anchorage-independent growth, a property of most malignant cells. Detachment from ECM is associated with enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) owing to altered glucose metabolism. Here we identify an unconventional pathway that supports redox homeostasis and growth during adaptation to anchorage independence. We observed that detachment from monolayer culture and growth as anchorage-independent tumour spheroids was accompanied by changes in both glucose and glutamine metabolism. Specifically, oxidation of both nutrients was suppressed in spheroids, whereas reductive formation of citrate from glutamine was enhanced. Reductive glutamine metabolism was highly dependent on cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1), because the activity was suppressed in cells homozygous null for IDH1 or treated with an IDH1 inhibitor. This activity occurred in absence of hypoxia, a well-known inducer of reductive metabolism. Rather, IDH1 mitigated mitochondrial ROS in spheroids, and suppressing IDH1 reduced spheroid growth through a mechanism requiring mitochondrial ROS. Isotope tracing revealed that in spheroids, isocitrate/citrate produced reductively in the cytosol could enter the mitochondria and participate in oxidative metabolism, including oxidation by IDH2. This generates NADPH in the mitochondria, enabling cells to mitigate mitochondrial ROS and maximize growth. Neither IDH1 nor IDH2 was necessary for monolayer growth, but deleting either one enhanced mitochondrial ROS and reduced spheroid size, as did deletion of the mitochondrial citrate transporter protein. Together, the data indicate that adaptation to anchorage independence requires a fundamental change in citrate metabolism, initiated by IDH1-dependent reductive carboxylation and culminating in suppression of mitochondrial ROS.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860952/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4860952/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Lei -- Shestov, Alexander A -- Swain, Pamela -- Yang, Chendong -- Parker, Seth J -- Wang, Qiong A -- Terada, Lance S -- Adams, Nicholas D -- McCabe, Michael T -- Pietrak, Beth -- Schmidt, Stan -- Metallo, Christian M -- Dranka, Brian P -- Schwartz, Benjamin -- DeBerardinis, Ralph J -- R01 CA157996/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA188652/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA157996/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA188652/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 14;532(7598):255-8. doi: 10.1038/nature17393. Epub 2016 Apr 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Children's Medical Center Research Institute, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390-8502, USA. ; Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Seahorse Bioscience, 16 Esquire Road, North Billerica, Massachusetts 01862, USA. ; Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Touchstone Diabetes Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; GlaxoSmithKline, 1250 South Collegeville Road, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27049945" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Adhesion ; Cell Hypoxia ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Citric Acid/*metabolism ; Contact Inhibition ; Cytosol/enzymology/metabolism ; Extracellular Matrix/metabolism ; Glucose/metabolism ; Glutamic Acid/metabolism ; Glutamine/metabolism ; *Homeostasis ; Humans ; Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/antagonists & inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Isocitrates/metabolism ; Mitochondria/*metabolism ; NADP/biosynthesis ; Neoplasms/enzymology/*metabolism/*pathology ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxidative Stress ; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism ; Spheroids, Cellular/metabolism/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-01-14
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Feng -- Lin, Qibing -- Zhu, Lihong -- Ren, Yulong -- Zhou, Kunneng -- Shabek, Nitzan -- Wu, Fuqing -- Mao, Haibin -- Dong, Wei -- Gan, Lu -- Ma, Weiwei -- Gao, He -- Chen, Jun -- Yang, Chao -- Wang, Dan -- Tan, Junjie -- Zhang, Xin -- Guo, Xiuping -- Wang, Jiulin -- Jiang, Ling -- Liu, Xi -- Chen, Weiqi -- Chu, Jinfang -- Yan, Cunyu -- Ueno, Kotomi -- Ito, Shinsaku -- Asami, Tadao -- Cheng, Zhijun -- Wang, Jie -- Lei, Cailin -- Zhai, Huqu -- Wu, Chuanyin -- Wang, Haiyang -- Zheng, Ning -- Wan, Jianmin -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 21;532(7599):402. doi: 10.1038/nature16537. Epub 2016 Jan 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26760207" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-08-08
    Description: Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is abundant in multiple brain regions, including the striatum, which serves as the input nucleus of the basal ganglia and is critically involved in procedural learning and motor memory. We investigated the functional role of ASIC1a in striatal neurons. We found that ASIC1a was critical for striatum-dependent motor coordination and procedural learning by regulating the synaptic plasticity of striatal medium spiny neurons. Global deletion of Asic1a in mice led to increased dendritic spine density but impaired spine morphology and postsynaptic architecture, which were accompanied by the decreased function of N -methyl- d -aspartate (NMDA) receptors at excitatory synapses. These structural and functional changes caused by the loss of ASIC1a were largely mediated by reduced activation (phosphorylation) of Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and extracellular signal–regulated protein kinases (ERKs). Consequently, Asic1a null mice exhibited poor performance on multiple motor tasks, which was rescued by striatal-specific expression of either ASIC1a or CaMKII. Together, our data reveal a previously unknown mechanism mediated by ASIC1a that promotes the excitatory synaptic function underlying striatum-related procedural learning and memory.
    Print ISSN: 1945-0877
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-05-17
    Description: Gene expression differs among individuals and populations and is thought to be a major determinant of phenotypic variation. Although variation and genetic loci responsible for RNA expression levels have been analysed extensively in human populations, our knowledge is limited regarding the differences in human protein abundance and the genetic basis for this difference. Variation in messenger RNA expression is not a perfect surrogate for protein expression because the latter is influenced by an array of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, and, empirically, the correlation between protein and mRNA levels is generally modest. Here we used isobaric tag-based quantitative mass spectrometry to determine relative protein levels of 5,953 genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines from 95 diverse individuals genotyped in the HapMap Project. We found that protein levels are heritable molecular phenotypes that exhibit considerable variation between individuals, populations and sexes. Levels of specific sets of proteins involved in the same biological process covary among individuals, indicating that these processes are tightly regulated at the protein level. We identified cis-pQTLs (protein quantitative trait loci), including variants not detected by previous transcriptome studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of high-throughput human proteome quantification that, when integrated with DNA variation and transcriptome information, adds a new dimension to the characterization of gene expression regulation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3789121/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3789121/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Linfeng -- Candille, Sophie I -- Choi, Yoonha -- Xie, Dan -- Jiang, Lihua -- Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer -- Tang, Hua -- Snyder, Michael -- P50 HG002357/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM073059/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL107393/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 4;499(7456):79-82. doi: 10.1038/nature12223. Epub 2013 May 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23676674" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Line ; Ethnic Groups/genetics ; Female ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Genotype ; HapMap Project ; Humans ; Male ; Mass Spectrometry ; *Phenotype ; *Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteome/*analysis/biosynthesis/*genetics ; Proteomics ; Quantitative Trait Loci ; RNA, Messenger/analysis/genetics ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-12-18
    Description: Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCF(D3) ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCF(D3) ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Liang -- Liu, Xue -- Xiong, Guosheng -- Liu, Huihui -- Chen, Fulu -- Wang, Lei -- Meng, Xiangbing -- Liu, Guifu -- Yu, Hong -- Yuan, Yundong -- Yi, Wei -- Zhao, Lihua -- Ma, Honglei -- He, Yuanzheng -- Wu, Zhongshan -- Melcher, Karsten -- Qian, Qian -- Xu, H Eric -- Wang, Yonghong -- Li, Jiayang -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 19;504(7480):401-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12870. Epub 2013 Dec 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics and National Center for Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China [2]. ; State Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics and National Center for Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue Northeast, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, China National Rice Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 310006, China. ; 1] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China [2] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue Northeast, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336200" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cloning, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Lactones/*antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Models, Biological ; Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; Mutation/genetics ; Oryza/genetics/*metabolism ; Plant Growth Regulators/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Plant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Proteolysis ; *Signal Transduction ; Ubiquitin/metabolism
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-08-29
    Description: Despite the large evolutionary distances between metazoan species, they can show remarkable commonalities in their biology, and this has helped to establish fly and worm as model organisms for human biology. Although studies of individual elements and factors have explored similarities in gene regulation, a large-scale comparative analysis of basic principles of transcriptional regulatory features is lacking. Here we map the genome-wide binding locations of 165 human, 93 worm and 52 fly transcription regulatory factors, generating a total of 1,019 data sets from diverse cell types, developmental stages, or conditions in the three species, of which 498 (48.9%) are presented here for the first time. We find that structural properties of regulatory networks are remarkably conserved and that orthologous regulatory factor families recognize similar binding motifs in vivo and show some similar co-associations. Our results suggest that gene-regulatory properties previously observed for individual factors are general principles of metazoan regulation that are remarkably well-preserved despite extensive functional divergence of individual network connections. The comparative maps of regulatory circuitry provided here will drive an improved understanding of the regulatory underpinnings of model organism biology and how these relate to human biology, development and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336544/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336544/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Boyle, Alan P -- Araya, Carlos L -- Brdlik, Cathleen -- Cayting, Philip -- Cheng, Chao -- Cheng, Yong -- Gardner, Kathryn -- Hillier, LaDeana W -- Janette, Judith -- Jiang, Lixia -- Kasper, Dionna -- Kawli, Trupti -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Li, Jingyi Jessica -- Ma, Lijia -- Niu, Wei -- Rehm, E Jay -- Rozowsky, Joel -- Slattery, Matthew -- Spokony, Rebecca -- Terrell, Robert -- Vafeados, Dionne -- Wang, Daifeng -- Weisdepp, Peter -- Wu, Yi-Chieh -- Xie, Dan -- Yan, Koon-Kiu -- Feingold, Elise A -- Good, Peter J -- Pazin, Michael J -- Huang, Haiyan -- Bickel, Peter J -- Brenner, Steven E -- Reinke, Valerie -- Waterston, Robert H -- Gerstein, Mark -- White, Kevin P -- Kellis, Manolis -- Snyder, Michael -- F32GM101778/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50GM081892/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RC2HG005679/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG004267/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004264/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01HG004267/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG004558/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006996/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG004558/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG006996/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000430/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 28;512(7515):453-6. doi: 10.1038/nature13668.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2]. ; Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Program of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Statistics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ilinois 60637, USA. ; National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 20892, USA. ; Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA [2] Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25164757" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Caenorhabditis elegans/*genetics/growth & development ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; Conserved Sequence/genetics ; Drosophila melanogaster/*genetics/growth & development ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Gene Regulatory Networks/*genetics ; Genome/genetics ; Humans ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Nucleotide Motifs/genetics ; Organ Specificity/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
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