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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most prevalent mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. To investigate the association of imatinib mesylate plasma concentration with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and influences of genetic polymorphisms on ADRs in GIST patients taking imatinib, a cohort of GIST patients consecutively treated with imatinib were included in the observational study. Clinical, pathologic and genotype information was recorded at enrollment and blood samples were collected at time as design. The plasma concentration of the imatinib was detected by LC-MS/MS. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the ADRs at each visit. SNPs in 13 genes were analyzed for a possible association with ADRs. The mean plasma trough concentration of 129 patients taking imatinib was 1.45 ± 0.79 μg/ml, average peak concentration was 2.63 ± 1.07 μg/ml. The imatinib concentration in patients treated with 600 mg/day was significantly higher than other dosage groups ( P 〈 0.05). The ADRs were mostly mild. Edema, vomiting, and fatigue were significantly correlated with imatinib concentration ( P 〈 0.05). Mutations of IL13 rs1800925 and CXCL14 rs7716492 were related with the incidence of leukopenia and rash in our research, separately ( P 〈 0.05). We confirmed that with the increase of imatinib concentration, the incidence of edema, vomiting, and fatigue rises as well. Mutations of IL13 rs1800925 and CXCL14 rs7716492 may be the promising biomarkers to predict the ADRs of imatinib. The results of the study are of guiding significance for the use of imatinib in patients with GIST.
    Print ISSN: 1535-7163
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-8514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-02-03
    Description: Quantum computers could be used to solve certain problems exponentially faster than classical computers, but are challenging to build because of their increased susceptibility to errors. However, it is possible to detect and correct errors without destroying coherence, by using quantum error correcting codes. The simplest of these are three-quantum-bit (three-qubit) codes, which map a one-qubit state to an entangled three-qubit state; they can correct any single phase-flip or bit-flip error on one of the three qubits, depending on the code used. Here we demonstrate such phase- and bit-flip error correcting codes in a superconducting circuit. We encode a quantum state, induce errors on the qubits and decode the error syndrome--a quantum state indicating which error has occurred--by reversing the encoding process. This syndrome is then used as the input to a three-qubit gate that corrects the primary qubit if it was flipped. As the code can recover from a single error on any qubit, the fidelity of this process should decrease only quadratically with error probability. We implement the correcting three-qubit gate (known as a conditional-conditional NOT, or Toffoli, gate) in 63 nanoseconds, using an interaction with the third excited state of a single qubit. We find 85 +/- 1 per cent fidelity to the expected classical action of this gate, and 78 +/- 1 per cent fidelity to the ideal quantum process matrix. Using this gate, we perform a single pass of both quantum bit- and phase-flip error correction and demonstrate the predicted first-order insensitivity to errors. Concatenation of these two codes in a nine-qubit device would correct arbitrary single-qubit errors. In combination with recent advances in superconducting qubit coherence times, this could lead to scalable quantum technology.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Reed, M D -- DiCarlo, L -- Nigg, S E -- Sun, L -- Frunzio, L -- Girvin, S M -- Schoelkopf, R J -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 1;482(7385):382-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10786.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. matthew.reed@yale.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22297844" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-08-21
    Description: The tumour necrosis factor (TNF) family is crucial for immune homeostasis, cell death and inflammation. These cytokines are recognized by members of the TNF receptor (TNFR) family of death receptors, including TNFR1 and TNFR2, and FAS and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors. Death receptor signalling requires death-domain-mediated homotypic/heterotypic interactions between the receptor and its downstream adaptors, including TNFR1-associated death domain protein (TRADD) and FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD). Here we discover that death domains in several proteins, including TRADD, FADD, RIPK1 and TNFR1, were directly inactivated by NleB, an enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) type III secretion system effector known to inhibit host nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signalling. NleB contained an unprecedented N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) transferase activity that specifically modified a conserved arginine in these death domains (Arg 235 in the TRADD death domain). NleB GlcNAcylation (the addition of GlcNAc onto a protein side chain) of death domains blocked homotypic/heterotypic death domain interactions and assembly of the oligomeric TNFR1 complex, thereby disrupting TNF signalling in EPEC-infected cells, including NF-kappaB signalling, apoptosis and necroptosis. Type-III-delivered NleB also blocked FAS ligand and TRAIL-induced cell death by preventing formation of a FADD-mediated death-inducing signalling complex (DISC). The arginine GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB was required for bacterial colonization in the mouse model of EPEC infection. The mechanism of action of NleB represents a new model by which bacteria counteract host defences, and also a previously unappreciated post-translational modification.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Shan -- Zhang, Li -- Yao, Qing -- Li, Lin -- Dong, Na -- Rong, Jie -- Gao, Wenqing -- Ding, Xiaojun -- Sun, Liming -- Chen, Xing -- Chen, She -- Shao, Feng -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Sep 12;501(7466):242-6. doi: 10.1038/nature12436. Epub 2013 Aug 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23955153" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acylation ; Animals ; Antigens, CD95/metabolism ; Apoptosis ; Arginine/*metabolism ; Death Domain Receptor Signaling Adaptor Proteins/metabolism ; Disease Models, Animal ; Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli/*metabolism/pathogenicity ; Escherichia coli Infections/metabolism/microbiology/pathology ; Escherichia coli Proteins/*metabolism ; Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein/chemistry/metabolism ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Multiprotein Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases/*metabolism ; NF-kappa B/metabolism ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptor-Interacting Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/chemistry/metabolism ; Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/chemistry/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; TNF Receptor-Associated Death Domain Protein/*chemistry/*metabolism ; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand/metabolism ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism ; Virulence ; Virulence Factors/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: The gamma-secretase complex, comprising presenilin 1 (PS1), PEN-2, APH-1 and nicastrin, is a membrane-embedded protease that controls a number of important cellular functions through substrate cleavage. Aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in aggregation of amyloid-beta, which accumulates in the brain and consequently causes Alzheimer's disease. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of an intact human gamma-secretase complex at 4.5 A resolution, determined by cryo-electron-microscopy single-particle analysis. The gamma-secretase complex comprises a horseshoe-shaped transmembrane domain, which contains 19 transmembrane segments (TMs), and a large extracellular domain (ECD) from nicastrin, which sits immediately above the hollow space formed by the TM horseshoe. Intriguingly, nicastrin ECD is structurally similar to a large family of peptidases exemplified by the glutamate carboxypeptidase PSMA. This structure serves as an important basis for understanding the functional mechanisms of the gamma-secretase complex.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4134323/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4134323/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lu, Peilong -- Bai, Xiao-chen -- Ma, Dan -- Xie, Tian -- Yan, Chuangye -- Sun, Linfeng -- Yang, Guanghui -- Zhao, Yanyu -- Zhou, Rui -- Scheres, Sjors H W -- Shi, Yigong -- MC_UP_A025_1013/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 14;512(7513):166-70. doi: 10.1038/nature13567. Epub 2014 Jun 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK [2]. ; 1] Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Bio-membrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences and School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043039" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/*chemistry ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Humans ; *Models, Molecular ; Protein Structure, Tertiary
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-31
    Description: Invasion of microbial DNA into the cytoplasm of animal cells triggers a cascade of host immune reactions that help clear the infection; however, self DNA in the cytoplasm can cause autoimmune diseases. Biochemical approaches led to the identification of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) as a cytosolic DNA sensor that triggers innate immune responses. Here, we show that cells from cGAS-deficient (cGas(-/-)) mice, including fibroblasts, macrophages, and dendritic cells, failed to produce type I interferons and other cytokines in response to DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGas(-/-) mice were more susceptible to lethal infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) than wild-type mice. We also show that cGAMP is an adjuvant that boosts antigen-specific T cell activation and antibody production in mice.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863637/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3863637/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Xiao-Dong -- Wu, Jiaxi -- Gao, Daxing -- Wang, Hua -- Sun, Lijun -- Chen, Zhijian J -- 5T32AI070116/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI-093967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI093967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Sep 20;341(6152):1390-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1244040. Epub 2013 Aug 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9148, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23989956" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis ; DNA, Viral/genetics/immunology ; Dendritic Cells/immunology ; Fibroblasts/immunology ; Herpes Simplex/*immunology ; *Herpesvirus 1, Human ; Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics ; Interferon-beta/*biosynthesis/genetics ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Macrophages/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics/*immunology ; Signal Transduction ; T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Transfection
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-12-22
    Description: Cytosolic DNA induces type I interferons and other cytokines that are important for antimicrobial defense but can also result in autoimmunity. This DNA signaling pathway requires the adaptor protein STING and the transcription factor IRF3, but the mechanism of DNA sensing is unclear. We found that mammalian cytosolic extracts synthesized cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP-AMP, or cGAMP) in vitro from adenosine triphosphate and guanosine triphosphate in the presence of DNA but not RNA. DNA transfection or DNA virus infection of mammalian cells also triggered cGAMP production. cGAMP bound to STING, leading to the activation of IRF3 and induction of interferon-beta. Thus, cGAMP functions as an endogenous second messenger in metazoans and triggers interferon production in response to cytosolic DNA.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3855410/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3855410/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Jiaxi -- Sun, Lijun -- Chen, Xiang -- Du, Fenghe -- Shi, Heping -- Chen, Chuo -- Chen, Zhijian J -- AI-093967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- GM-079554/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI093967/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM079554/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Feb 15;339(6121):826-30. doi: 10.1126/science.1229963. Epub 2012 Dec 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23258412" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Extracts/chemistry ; Cell Line ; Cyclic AMP/*metabolism ; Cyclic GMP/*metabolism ; Cytosol/*immunology ; DNA/*immunology ; HEK293 Cells ; Herpesvirus 1, Human/immunology ; Humans ; *Immunity, Innate ; Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism ; Interferon-beta/biosynthesis ; Membrane Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Mice ; Nucleotides, Cyclic/*metabolism ; RNA Interference ; Second Messenger Systems/*immunology ; Transfection
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-03-01
    Description: Pressure has an essential role in the production and control of superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. Substitution of a large cation by a smaller rare-earth ion to simulate the pressure effect has raised the superconducting transition temperature T(c) to a record high of 55 K in these materials. In the same way as T(c) exhibits a bell-shaped curve of dependence on chemical doping, pressure-tuned T(c) typically drops monotonically after passing the optimal pressure. Here we report that in the superconducting iron chalcogenides, a second superconducting phase suddenly re-emerges above 11.5 GPa, after the T(c) drops from the first maximum of 32 K at 1 GPa. The T(c) of the re-emerging superconducting phase is considerably higher than the first maximum, reaching 48.0-48.7 K for Tl(0.6)Rb(0.4)Fe(1.67)Se(2), K(0.8)Fe(1.7)Se(2) and K(0.8)Fe(1.78)Se(2).〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sun, Liling -- Chen, Xiao-Jia -- Guo, Jing -- Gao, Peiwen -- Huang, Qing-Zhen -- Wang, Hangdong -- Fang, Minghu -- Chen, Xiaolong -- Chen, Genfu -- Wu, Qi -- Zhang, Chao -- Gu, Dachun -- Dong, Xiaoli -- Wang, Lin -- Yang, Ke -- Li, Aiguo -- Dai, Xi -- Mao, Ho-kwang -- Zhao, Zhongxian -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 22;483(7387):67-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10813.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22367543" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-10-19
    Description: Glucose transporters are essential for metabolism of glucose in cells of diverse organisms from microbes to humans, exemplified by the disease-related human proteins GLUT1, 2, 3 and 4. Despite rigorous efforts, the structural information for GLUT1-4 or their homologues remains largely unknown. Here we report three related crystal structures of XylE, an Escherichia coli homologue of GLUT1-4, in complex with d-xylose, d-glucose and 6-bromo-6-deoxy-D-glucose, at resolutions of 2.8, 2.9 and 2.6 A, respectively. The structure consists of a typical major facilitator superfamily fold of 12 transmembrane segments and a unique intracellular four-helix domain. XylE was captured in an outward-facing, partly occluded conformation. Most of the important amino acids responsible for recognition of D-xylose or d-glucose are invariant in GLUT1-4, suggesting functional and mechanistic conservations. Structure-based modelling of GLUT1-4 allows mapping and interpretation of disease-related mutations. The structural and biochemical information reported here constitutes an important framework for mechanistic understanding of glucose transporters and sugar porters in general.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sun, Linfeng -- Zeng, Xin -- Yan, Chuangye -- Sun, Xiuyun -- Gong, Xinqi -- Rao, Yu -- Yan, Nieng -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 18;490(7420):361-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11524.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Bio-membrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Center for Structural Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075985" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Biological Transport ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Deoxyglucose/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Escherichia coli/*chemistry ; Escherichia coli Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism ; Glucose/chemistry/metabolism ; Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative/*chemistry/metabolism ; Glucose Transporter Type 1/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Conformation ; Structural Homology, Protein ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; Substrate Specificity ; Symporters/*chemistry/metabolism ; Xylose/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Quantum error correction is required for a practical quantum computer because of the fragile nature of quantum information. In quantum error correction, information is redundantly stored in a large quantum state space and one or more observables must be monitored to reveal the occurrence of an error, without disturbing the information encoded in an unknown quantum state. Such observables, typically multi-quantum-bit parities, must correspond to a special symmetry property inherent in the encoding scheme. Measurements of these observables, or error syndromes, must also be performed in a quantum non-demolition way (projecting without further perturbing the state) and more quickly than errors occur. Previously, quantum non-demolition measurements of quantum jumps between states of well-defined energy have been performed in systems such as trapped ions, electrons, cavity quantum electrodynamics, nitrogen-vacancy centres and superconducting quantum bits. So far, however, no fast and repeated monitoring of an error syndrome has been achieved. Here we track the quantum jumps of a possible error syndrome, namely the photon number parity of a microwave cavity, by mapping this property onto an ancilla quantum bit, whose only role is to facilitate quantum state manipulation and measurement. This quantity is just the error syndrome required in a recently proposed scheme for a hardware-efficient protected quantum memory using Schrodinger cat states (quantum superpositions of different coherent states of light) in a harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate the projective nature of this measurement onto a region of state space with well-defined parity by observing the collapse of a coherent state onto even or odd cat states. The measurement is fast compared with the cavity lifetime, has a high single-shot fidelity and has a 99.8 per cent probability per single measurement of leaving the parity unchanged. In combination with the deterministic encoding of quantum information in cat states realized earlier, the quantum non-demolition parity tracking that we demonstrate represents an important step towards implementing an active system that extends the lifetime of a quantum bit.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sun, L -- Petrenko, A -- Leghtas, Z -- Vlastakis, B -- Kirchmair, G -- Sliwa, K M -- Narla, A -- Hatridge, M -- Shankar, S -- Blumoff, J -- Frunzio, L -- Mirrahimi, M -- Devoret, M H -- Schoelkopf, R J -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 24;511(7510):444-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13436. Epub 2014 Jul 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Departments of Applied Physics and Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA [2] Center for Quantum Information, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China (L.S.); Institut fur Experimentalphysik, Universitat Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria and Institut fur Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Otto-Hittmair-Platz 1, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria (G.K.). ; Departments of Applied Physics and Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; 1] Departments of Applied Physics and Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA [2] INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt, Domaine de Voluceau, BP 105, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043007" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-12-18
    Description: Prokaryotic viruses have evolved various mechanisms to transport their genomes across bacterial cell walls. Many bacteriophages use a tail to perform this function, whereas tail-less phages rely on host organelles. However, the tail-less, icosahedral, single-stranded DNA PhiX174-like coliphages do not fall into these well-defined infection processes. For these phages, DNA delivery requires a DNA pilot protein. Here we show that the PhiX174 pilot protein H oligomerizes to form a tube whose function is most probably to deliver the DNA genome across the host's periplasmic space to the cytoplasm. The 2.4 A resolution crystal structure of the in vitro assembled H protein's central domain consists of a 170 A-long alpha-helical barrel. The tube is constructed of ten alpha-helices with their amino termini arrayed in a right-handed super-helical coiled-coil and their carboxy termini arrayed in a left-handed super-helical coiled-coil. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that the tube is essential for infectivity but does not affect in vivo virus assembly. Cryo-electron tomograms show that tubes span the periplasmic space and are present while the genome is being delivered into the host cell's cytoplasm. Both ends of the H protein contain transmembrane domains, which anchor the assembled tubes into the inner and outer cell membranes. The central channel of the H-protein tube is lined with amide and guanidinium side chains. This may be a general property of viral DNA conduits and is likely to be critical for efficient genome translocation into the host.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sun, Lei -- Young, Lindsey N -- Zhang, Xinzheng -- Boudko, Sergei P -- Fokine, Andrei -- Zbornik, Erica -- Roznowski, Aaron P -- Molineux, Ian J -- Rossmann, Michael G -- Fane, Bentley A -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 16;505(7483):432-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12816. Epub 2013 Dec 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA [2]. ; 1] School of Plant Sciences and the BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA [2] The Research Department, Shriner's Hospital for Children, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; School of Plant Sciences and the BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. ; Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336205" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacteriophage phi X 174/*chemistry/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Biological Transport ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cytoplasm/metabolism/ultrastructure/virology ; DNA, Viral/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; Escherichia coli/cytology/ultrastructure/*virology ; Genome, Viral ; Models, Molecular ; Periplasm/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Viral Proteins/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; *Virus Assembly
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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