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  • 1
    Abstract: Oncogenic fusion events have been identified in a broad range of tumors. Among them, RET rearrangements represent distinct and potentially druggable targets that are recurrently found in lung adenocarcinomas. We provide further evidence that current anti-RET drugs may not be potent enough to induce durable responses in such tumors. We report that potent inhibitors, such as AD80 or ponatinib, that stably bind in the DFG-out conformation of RET may overcome these limitations and selectively kill RET-rearranged tumors. Using chemical genomics in conjunction with phosphoproteomic analyses in RET-rearranged cells, we identify the CCDC6-RETI788N mutation and drug-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway reactivation as possible mechanisms by which tumors may escape the activity of RET inhibitors. Our data provide mechanistic insight into the druggability of RET kinase fusions that may be of help for the development of effective therapies targeting such tumors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28615362
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; carcinoma ; Germany ; MODEL ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; RNA ; transcription ; METABOLISM ; MECHANISM ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; INDUCTION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; MOUSE ; TRANSGENIC MICE ; AMPLIFICATION ; resistance ; NUMBER ; PHENOTYPE ; CARCINOMAS ; ABNORMALITIES ; drug resistance ; DRUG-RESISTANCE ; CYCLIN D1 ; RE ; P-GLYCOPROTEIN ; PROGNOSTIC MARKER ; BOX-BINDING-PROTEIN ; CYTOKINESIS
    Abstract: YB-1 protein levels are elevated in most human breast cancers, and high YB-1 levels have been correlated with drug resistance and poor clinical outcome. YB-1 is a stress-responsive, cell cycle-regulated transcription factor with additional functions in RNA metabolism and translation. In this study, we show in a novel transgenic mouse model that human hemagglutinin-tagged YB-1 provokes remarkably diverse breast carcinomas through the induction of genetic instability that emerges from mitotic failure and centrosome amplification. The increase of centrosome numbers proceeds during breast cancer development and explanted tumor cell cultures show the phenotype of ongoing numerical chromosomal instability. These data illustrate a mechanism that might contribute to human breast cancer development
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15899797
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  • 3
    Keywords: carcinoma ; IN-VIVO ; PATHWAY ; GENES ; MUTATIONS ; MOUSE MODEL ; C-KIT ; CYCLE ARREST ; NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS ; NOTCH
    Abstract: We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Deltaex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26168399
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  • 4
    Abstract: Kinase inhibitors represent the backbone of targeted cancer therapy, yet only a limited number of oncogenic drivers are directly druggable. By interrogating the activity of 1,505 kinase inhibitors, we found that BRD4-NUT-rearranged NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) cells are specifically killed by CDK9 inhibition (CDK9i) and depend on CDK9 and Cyclin-T1 expression. We show that CDK9i leads to robust induction of apoptosis and of markers of DNA damage response in NMC cells. While both CDK9i and bromodomain inhibition over time result in reduced Myc protein expression, only bromodomain inhibition induces cell differentiation and a p21-induced cell-cycle arrest in these cells. Finally, RNA-seq and ChIP-based analyses reveal a BRD4-NUT-specific CDK9i-induced perturbation of transcriptional elongation. Thus, our data provide a mechanistic basis for the genotype-dependent vulnerability of NMC cells to CDK9i that may be of relevance for the development of targeted therapies for NMC patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28930680
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  • 5
    ISSN: 0303-7207
    Keywords: 17β-Estradiol dehydrogenase ; Actin-binding ; SH3 ; Sterol carrier protein 2 ; Targeting signals
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Deltaex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉George, Julie -- Lim, Jing Shan -- Jang, Se Jin -- Cun, Yupeng -- Ozretic, Luka -- Kong, Gu -- Leenders, Frauke -- Lu, Xin -- Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette -- Bosco, Graziella -- Muller, Christian -- Dahmen, Ilona -- Jahchan, Nadine S -- Park, Kwon-Sik -- Yang, Dian -- Karnezis, Anthony N -- Vaka, Dedeepya -- Torres, Angela -- Wang, Maia Segura -- Korbel, Jan O -- Menon, Roopika -- Chun, Sung-Min -- Kim, Deokhoon -- Wilkerson, Matt -- Hayes, Neil -- Engelmann, David -- Putzer, Brigitte -- Bos, Marc -- Michels, Sebastian -- Vlasic, Ignacija -- Seidel, Danila -- Pinther, Berit -- Schaub, Philipp -- Becker, Christian -- Altmuller, Janine -- Yokota, Jun -- Kohno, Takashi -- Iwakawa, Reika -- Tsuta, Koji -- Noguchi, Masayuki -- Muley, Thomas -- Hoffmann, Hans -- Schnabel, Philipp A -- Petersen, Iver -- Chen, Yuan -- Soltermann, Alex -- Tischler, Verena -- Choi, Chang-min -- Kim, Yong-Hee -- Massion, Pierre P -- Zou, Yong -- Jovanovic, Dragana -- Kontic, Milica -- Wright, Gavin M -- Russell, Prudence A -- Solomon, Benjamin -- Koch, Ina -- Lindner, Michael -- Muscarella, Lucia A -- la Torre, Annamaria -- Field, John K -- Jakopovic, Marko -- Knezevic, Jelena -- Castanos-Velez, Esmeralda -- Roz, Luca -- Pastorino, Ugo -- Brustugun, Odd-Terje -- Lund-Iversen, Marius -- Thunnissen, Erik -- Kohler, Jens -- Schuler, Martin -- Botling, Johan -- Sandelin, Martin -- Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat -- Salvesen, Helga B -- Achter, Viktor -- Lang, Ulrich -- Bogus, Magdalena -- Schneider, Peter M -- Zander, Thomas -- Ansen, Sascha -- Hallek, Michael -- Wolf, Jurgen -- Vingron, Martin -- Yatabe, Yasushi -- Travis, William D -- Nurnberg, Peter -- Reinhardt, Christian -- Perner, Sven -- Heukamp, Lukas -- Buttner, Reinhard -- Haas, Stefan A -- Brambilla, Elisabeth -- Peifer, Martin -- Sage, Julien -- Thomas, Roman K -- 5R01CA114102-08/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 6;524(7563):47-53. doi: 10.1038/nature14664. Epub 2015 Jul 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Translational Genomics, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Center for Cancer Genome Discovery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea. ; Department of Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. 222 Wangsimniro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea. ; Vancouver General Hospital, Terry Fox laboratory, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Genome Biology Unit, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute of Pathology, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, University Hospital of Bonn, 53127 Bonn, Germany. ; Center for Cancer Genome Discovery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea. ; Department of Genetics, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7295, USA. ; UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7295, USA. ; Institute of Experimental Gene Therapy and Cancer Research, Rostock University Medical Center, 18057 Rostock, Germany. ; Department I of Internal Medicine, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, University Hospital Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Cologne Center for Genomics (CCG), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Cologne Center for Genomics (CCG), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [2] Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045, Japan. [2] Genomics and Epigenomics of Cancer Prediction Program, Institute of Predictive and Personalized Medicine of Cancer (IMPPC), Barcelona 08916, Spain. ; Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045, Japan. ; Department of Pathology and Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045, Japan. ; Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan. ; 1] Thoraxklinik at University Hospital Heidelberg, Amalienstrasse 5, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Amalienstrasse 5, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Thoraxklinik at University Hospital Heidelberg, Amalienstrasse 5, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Amalienstrasse 5, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 220, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University, 07743 Jena, Germany. ; Institute of Surgical Pathology, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. ; Department of Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea. ; Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736, Korea. ; Thoracic Program, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center PRB 640, 2220 Pierce Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; University Hospital of Pulmonology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Medical School, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia. ; Department of Surgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 3065 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ; Department of Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 3065 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ; Department of Haematology and Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 3065 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ; Asklepios Biobank fur Lungenerkrankungen, Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Asklepios Fachkliniken Munchen-Gauting 82131, Germany. ; Laboratory of Oncology, IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza, Viale Cappuccini, 71013 San Giovanni, Rotondo, Italy. ; Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, The University of Liverpool Cancer Research Centre, 200 London Road, L69 3GA Liverpool, UK. ; University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Department for Respiratory Diseases Jordanovac, University Hospital Center Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. ; Laboratory for Translational Medicine, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. ; Charite Comprehensive Cancer Center, Charite Campus Mitte, 10115 Berlin, Germany. ; Tumor Genomics Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS - Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan, Italy. ; Thoracic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, 20133 Milan, Italy. ; 1] Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0424 Oslo, Norway. [2] Department of Oncology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. ; Department of Pathology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. ; Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, 1007 MB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ; 1] West German Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Essen, 45147 Essen, Germany. [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Departments of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, and Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Genes and Cancer Group, Cancer Epigenetics and Biology Program (PEBC), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), 08908 Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. ; 1] Department of Clinical Science, Center for Cancer Biomarkers, University of Bergen, N-5058 Bergen, Norway. [2] Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5058 Bergen, Norway. ; Computing Center, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Computing Center, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [2] Department of Informatics, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Cologne, 50823 Cologne, Germany. ; Gastrointestinal Cancer Group Cologne, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Department I for Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Department I of Internal Medicine, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, University Hospital Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany. [2] Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Computational Molecular Biology Group, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, 14195 Berlin, Germany. ; Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center, 464-8681 Nagoya, Japan. ; Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Cologne Center for Genomics (CCG), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [2] Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [3] Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Department of Pathology, CHU Grenoble INSERM U823, University Joseph Fourier, Institute Albert Bonniot 38043, CS10217 Grenoble, France. ; 1] Department of Translational Genomics, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [2] Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Department of Translational Genomics, Center of Integrated Oncology Cologne-Bonn, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany. [2] Department of Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, 50937 Cologne, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26168399" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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