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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; SAMPLE ; TIME ; RISK-FACTORS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; SWEDEN ; RISK FACTOR ; SIR ; ASBESTOS ; time trends ; TRENDS ; mesothelioma
    Abstract: Epidemiologic data on peritoneal mesothelioma are scarce but exposure to asbestos is an identified risk factor. To characterize the disease, time trends, age-incidence relationships, and occupational risk factors for peritoneal mesothelioma were studied based on the Swedish Family-Database covering years 1961 to 1998. Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare disease and only 96 male and 113 female cases were recorded during the 38-year period, Age-standardized incidence of the disease has increased for men until 1985 and leveled off thereafter. The incidence in women has been equally high but it has continued to increase toward the end of the follow-up period. The incidence was maximal at an age around 80 years for both genders. No female occupational or socioeconomic group was at risk. For men, 29% of the cases had typical asbestos related jobs with a SIR of 1.70. Bricklayers and plumbers had the highest risk of 7.22 and 5.12 respectively Within limits of the sample,. size, no evidence was noted for risk from environmental exposures to asbestos because the risk of farmers and that of urban residents were not different
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12708149
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  • 2
    Keywords: FOLLOW-UP ; LUNG-CANCER ; CANCER MORTALITY ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; WORKERS ; TIME ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; AGE ; MEN ; risk factors ; RATES ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; INCIDENCE RATES ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; ASBESTOS ; ASBESTOS EXPOSURE ; EUROPE ; MALIGNANT MESOTHELIOMA ; REFINERY/PETROCHEMICAL PLANT COHORTS
    Abstract: Epidemiologic data on pleural mesothelioma are scarce on regional and occupational time trends, which would monitor the effects of changes in exposure to asbestos. We aim to characterize time trends, regional, socioeconomic, and occupational risk factors for pleural mesothelioma in Sweden in the years from 1961 to 1998. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to identify patients with pleural mesothelioma. Age- standardized incidence rates and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) were calculated for the population in the Database. A total of 1298 male and 233 female pleural mesotheliomas were retrieved. Age-standardized incidence of the disease was highest, and the trend increased in residents of large industrial and shipbuilding cities. In the last follow-up period, the male rate exceeded the female rate about 10-fold. Among male socioeconomic groups, manual workers showed the highest and ever-increasing SIR. No female socioeconomic group was at risk. For men, plumbers and seamen had the highest risk of 4.56 and 2.83, respectively, but the risks appeared to be decreasing for plumbers, whereas no clear trend was noted for seamen, probably because of indirect expose in ships. Farmers showed an SIR of 0.28, indicating that the population at large was at four times higher risk than farmers. The SIRs of many academic/college-educated groups were two to six times higher than those of farmers, suggesting indirect exposure to asbestos in these groups
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12708150
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; human ; RISK ; SWEDEN ; POPULATIONS ; SPOUSES ; LANGUAGE
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12673273
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; neoplasms ; FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; SKIN ; treatment ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; WOMEN ; leukemia ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; HEREDITARY ; SIR ; familial risk ; SMALL-INTESTINE ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; germline mutations ; double primaries ; endometrioid tumor ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; FIRST- DEGREE RELATIVES ; heritable effects ; HODGKINS- DISEASE ; multiple primaries ; NONPOLYPOSIS COLORECTAL-CANCER ; second carcinoma ; synchronous carcinoma
    Abstract: BACKGROUND. Population-based data on subsequent neoplasms after women are diagnosed with endometrial and ovarian carcinomas are limited, particularly regarding specific histologic tumor types. METHODS. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database of 10.2 million individuals, which includes 19,128 invasive endometrial carcinomas and 19,440 ovarian carcinomas, was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for second primary carcinomas. SIRs were calculated for specific follow-up periods. Data on histopathologic types also were used. RESULTS. An excess of subsequent malignancies after women were diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma was noted at 11 sites. The highest SIRs were recorded for synchronous or metasynchronous ovarian carcinomas (SIR, 55.77; 95% CI, 48.82-63.43) and carcinomas of the small intestines (SIR, 14.71; 95% Cl, 4.64-34.59). Primary ovarian carcinoma was followed by an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma, and the risks of developing many other malignancies also were increased after women were diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma, including intestinal malignancies, renal cell carcinoma, bladder carcinoma, squamous cell skin carcinoma, connective tissue malignancies, and leukemia. When ovarian endometrioid histology was diagnosed synchronously with primary endometrial carcinoma, the SIR was 140; when endometrial carcinoma was the subsequent neoplasm, the SIR was 87. A small familial component was found in the cooccurrence of endometrial carcinoma and ovarian carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS. The current data show a strong clustering of endometrial carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas, particularly involving tumors of endometrioid morphology. The patterns of second neoplasms also suggest that hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal. carcinoma may contribute to the association between endometrial and ovarian malignancies. Increased risks for connective tissue tumors and leukemia may signal a response to treatment, and an increased risk for squamous cell skin carcinoma may signal a depressed immune function. (C) 2003 American Cancer Society
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12733142
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; NEW-YORK ; MEN ; SWEDEN ; ASBESTOS ; mesothelioma ; EUROPE ; PLEURAL MESOTHELIOMA ; CURRENT TRENDS
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG-CANCER ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; time trends ; education ; INCIDENCE TRENDS ; SOCIOECONOMIC GROUPS
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; IMPACT ; cancer prevention ; prevention ; HEALTH ; lifestyle ; WOMEN ; MEN ; SWEDEN ; cancer risk ; DATABASE ; SIR ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; BRITAIN ; INEQUALITIES ; LONE MOTHERS ; MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; NORWEGIAN WOMEN BORN
    Abstract: Limited data are available on the possible changes in cancer risk brought about by widowhood and divorce, an increasing segment of the population. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancer among 47,000 widows/widowers and 60,000 divorced people, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Persons had to be identified with the same civil status in the census of years 1960 and 1970; the comparison group was married people according to the same censuses. Cancers were followed from years 1971 to 1998. Both increased and decreased SIRs were found, and a consistent pattern emerged. The effects on the divorced were always stronger than those in widows/widowers, irrespective of the direction of the effect. Every significant SIR for a cancer site in widows/widowers was accompanied by a more deviant and significant SIR in the divorced. SIRs between divorced men and women (r = 0.83, P 〈 0.0001) and between widows and divorcees correlated (r = 0.70, P 〈 0.0001). The overall cancer risk for the divorced was 0.92-0.94, and it was a balance between increased risks at tobacco-, alcohol-, and human papilloma virus-related sites, and decreased risks at most other sites. The data suggest that the changes in lifestyle on the loss of a spouse impact on the incidence of almost every type of cancer. The effects were so large that a failure to consider marital status in epidemiological studies may be a source to bias. Understanding these lifestyle changes may provide new insight in cancer prevention
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14504201
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  • 8
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    International Journal of Cancer 105 (1), 144-146 
    Keywords: CANCER ; MORTALITY ; MEN ; SWEDEN ; ASBESTOS ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; PLEURAL MESOTHELIOMA
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12672045
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; LUNG ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; HISTORY ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; PATIENT ; FAMILY ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; NUMBER ; AGE ; family history ; smoking ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; HEREDITARY ; HIGH-RISK ; CARCINOGENS ; SIR ; adenocarcinoma ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; squamous cell carcinoma ; TOBACCO ; INDIVIDUALS ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; familial cancer ; hereditary factors ; lung neoplasms ; YOUNG ; CELL CARCINOMA ; REGISTRY ; SIBLINGS ; AGE 50 ; CARCINOGEN ; SEGREGATION ANALYSIS
    Abstract: The role of hereditary factors in lung cancer is less well understood than in many other human neoplastic diseases. We used a nation-wide family dataset to search for evidence for a genetic predisposition in lung cancer. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0- to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (Cl) were calculated for age-specific familial risks in offspring by parental or sibling proband, separately. A Kappa test was used to examine the association between familial risk and histology. Compared to the rate of lung cancers among persons without family history, a high risk by parental family history in adenocarcinoma (2.03) and large cell carcinoma (2.14) was found, and only a slightly lower risk was found among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (1.63) and small cell carcinoma (1.55). Among siblings, an increased risk was shown for concordant adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma at all ages and for all histological types when cancer was diagnosed before age 50. At young age, risks between siblings were higher than those between offspring and parents. The present data suggest that a large proportion of lung cancers before age 50 years appears to be heritable and probably due to a high-penetrant recessive gene or genes that predispose to tobacco carcinogens; however, this hypothesis needs to be tested in segregation analysis with a large number of pedigrees. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss. Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15382071
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; neoplasms ; COMMON ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; renal ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; IDENTIFICATION ; DIFFERENCE ; AGE ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; MUTATIONS ; SIR ; familial risk ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; CLUSTER ; CHILDHOOD LEUKEMIA ; IMMIGRANTS ; SEGREGATION ANALYSES ; cancer genes ; familial cancers ; heritable cancer
    Abstract: Occurrence of cancer in parents and offspring may be due to dominant causes, whereas cancer affecting only siblings may indicate a recessive causation. Systematic comparisons of mode of inheritance have not been available for most types of cancer. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for offspring whose parents or siblings were diagnosed with the same cancer. The degree of environmental causation was assessed by spouse correlation and by comparing risks among siblings of different ages. We identified reliable familial risks for all common neoplasms, SIRs ranging from 1.6 to 4.3 when only a parent was affected and up to 8.5 when only a sibling was effected. Risks between siblings were particularly high for renal cancer. Spouse correlation was found only for lung and stomach cancer, but the analysis of sibling risks by their age difference suggested that even for some other cancers environmental effects in childhood may contribute to familial aggregation. The results from these analysis suggest that familial cluster of cancer at most sites is heritable, caused by dominant effects; for renal cancer recessive effects may be most important. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15069696
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