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  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-6865
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract The immunohistochemical localization and expression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptors (VDR) has been investigated in normal human cervical tissue (n = 15) and in cervical carcinomas (n = 23). VDR immunoreactivity (monoclonal antibody 9A7r354;) was compared with the staining patterns of transglutaminase K, cytokeratin 10 and Ki-67 in these tumours. Moderate to strong nuclear immunoreactivity for VDR was detected in almost all cervical carcinomas analysed. VDR staining was homogeneous, with no visual differences between individual tumour cells. Some 60% of normal cervical tissues revealed weak immunoreactivity for VDR. In normal cervical tissue, nuclear VDR staining was confined to the lower cervical layers, predominantly to the basal cell layer. Both the intensity of VDR immunostaining and the number of VDR-positive cells were up-regulated in cervical carcinomas compared with normal cervical tissue. No visual correlation wa s found for the coexpression of VDR with markers of proliferation and differentiation. Our findings indicate that: (1) cervical tissue may be a new target organ for therapeutically applied vitamin D analogues; (2) VDR is up-regulated at the protein level in cervical carcinomas compared with normal cervical tissue; (3) up-regulation of VDR in cervical carcinoma is induced not exclusively by alterations in epithelial differentiation or proliferation, but by different, unknown mechanisms; and (4) calcitriol and new vitamin D analogues exerting fewer calcaemic side-effects may be promising new drugs for the treatment or chemoprevention of metastasizing cervical carcinomas as well as of cervical precancerous lesions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-6865
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract We have analysed the expression and distribution of the DNA mismatch repair enzyme hMSH-2 in normal skin and basal cell carcinomas. hMSH-2 protein was investigated immunohistochemically (normal human skin: n=10; basal cell carcinomas: n=16) on frozen sections using a highly sensitive streptavidin–peroxidase technique and a specific mouse monoclonal antibody (clone FE11). In normal human skin, we found nuclear immunoreactivity for hMSH-2 in epidermal keratinocytes of the basal and first 1–3 suprabasal cell layers. All basal cell carcinomas analysed revealed strong nuclear imunoreactivity that was pronounced in peripheral tumour cells and cells of the palisade. Expression of hMSH-2 protein was consistently and strongly upregulated in tumour cells of the carcinomas as compared to adjacent unaffected epidermis or epidermis of normal human skin. Twelve of the sixteen carcinomas analysed revealed no visual correlation in comparing the labelling patterns for hMSH-2 with the labelling pattern for the proliferation marker Ki-67. Our findings indicate that (a) hMSH-2 is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes, predominantly in lower cell layers of the viable epidermis; (b) expression of hMSH-2 protein is strongly upregulated in basal cell carcinomas as compared to unaffected epidermis; (c) the level of hMSH-2 proteins in the carcinomas is not exclusively regulated by the proliferative activity of these tumour cells; (d) inactivating mutations of the hMSH-2 gene may in the carcinomas not be involved in the carcinogenesis or microsatellite instability secondary to replication errors; (e) expression of hMSH-2 may be of importance for the genetic stability of basal cell carcinomas in vivo.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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