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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-11-23
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Galetti, Mauro -- Eizirik, Eduardo -- Beisiegel, Beatriz -- Ferraz, Katia -- Cavalcanti, Sandra -- Srbek-Araujo, Ana Carolina -- Crawshaw, Peter -- Paviolo, Agustin -- Galetti, Pedro Manoel Jr -- Jorge, Maria Luisa -- Marinho-Filho, Jader -- Vercillo, Ugo -- Morato, Ronaldo -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Nov 22;342(6161):930. doi: 10.1126/science.342.6161.930-a.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24264975" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Animal Migration ; Animals ; *Biota ; *Conservation of Natural Resources ; *Food Chain ; Humans ; *Predatory Behavior
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-06-01
    Description: Local extinctions have cascading effects on ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the potential for the rapid evolutionary change of species in human-modified scenarios. We show that the functional extinction of large-gape seed dispersers in the Brazilian Atlantic forest is associated with the consistent reduction of the seed size of a keystone palm species. Among 22 palm populations, areas deprived of large avian frugivores for several decades present smaller seeds than nondefaunated forests, with negative consequences for palm regeneration. Coalescence and phenotypic selection models indicate that seed size reduction most likely occurred within the past 100 years, associated with human-driven fragmentation. The fast-paced defaunation of large vertebrates is most likely causing unprecedented changes in the evolutionary trajectories and community composition of tropical forests.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Galetti, Mauro -- Guevara, Roger -- Cortes, Marina C -- Fadini, Rodrigo -- Von Matter, Sandro -- Leite, Abraao B -- Labecca, Fabio -- Ribeiro, Thiago -- Carvalho, Carolina S -- Collevatti, Rosane G -- Pires, Mathias M -- Guimaraes, Paulo R Jr -- Brancalion, Pedro H -- Ribeiro, Milton C -- Jordano, Pedro -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 31;340(6136):1086-90. doi: 10.1126/science.1233774.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo, Brazil. mgaletti@rc.unesp.br〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23723235" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Arecaceae ; *Biological Evolution ; *Birds ; Brazil ; *Extinction, Biological ; *Feeding Behavior ; *Germination ; Seeds/*anatomy & histology/physiology ; Trees
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2014-07-26
    Description: We live amid a global wave of anthropogenically driven biodiversity loss: species and population extirpations and, critically, declines in local species abundance. Particularly, human impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change. Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. Invertebrate patterns are equally dire: 67% of monitored populations show 45% mean abundance decline. Such animal declines will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being. Much remains unknown about this "Anthropocene defaunation"; these knowledge gaps hinder our capacity to predict and limit defaunation impacts. Clearly, however, defaunation is both a pervasive component of the planet's sixth mass extinction and also a major driver of global ecological change.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dirzo, Rodolfo -- Young, Hillary S -- Galetti, Mauro -- Ceballos, Gerardo -- Isaac, Nick J B -- Collen, Ben -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 25;345(6195):401-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1251817.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. rdirzo@stanford.edu. ; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA. ; Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP, 13506-900, Brazil. ; Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-275, Mexico D.F. 04510, Mexico. ; Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK. ; Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061202" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Biodiversity ; Birds ; *Endangered Species ; *Extinction, Biological ; *Human Activities ; Humans ; Insects ; Invertebrates ; Mammals ; Pest Control ; Pollination ; Population
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-12-07
    Description: Predicting and managing the global carbon cycle requires scientific understanding of ecosystem processes that control carbon uptake and storage. It is generally assumed that carbon cycling is sufficiently characterized in terms of uptake and exchange between ecosystem plant and soil pools and the atmosphere. We show that animals also play an important role by mediating carbon exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere, at times turning ecosystem carbon sources into sinks, or vice versa. Animals also move across landscapes, creating a dynamism that shapes landscape-scale variation in carbon exchange and storage. Predicting and measuring carbon cycling under such dynamism is an important scientific challenge. We explain how to link analyses of spatial ecosystem functioning, animal movement, and remote sensing of animal habitats with carbon dynamics across landscapes.
    Keywords: Ecology, Online Only
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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