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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-11-10
    Description: Maps of crustal thickness derived from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission revealed more large impact basins on the nearside hemisphere of the Moon than on its farside. The enrichment in heat-producing elements and prolonged volcanic activity on the lunar nearside hemisphere indicate that the temperature of the nearside crust and upper mantle was hotter than that of the farside at the time of basin formation. Using the iSALE-2D hydrocode to model impact basin formation, we found that impacts on the hotter nearside would have formed basins with up to twice the diameter of similar impacts on the cooler farside hemisphere. The size distribution of lunar impact basins is thus not representative of the earliest inner solar system impact bombardment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miljkovicc, Katarina -- Wieczorek, Mark A -- Collins, Gareth S -- Laneuville, Matthieu -- Neumann, Gregory A -- Melosh, H Jay -- Solomon, Sean C -- Phillips, Roger J -- Smith, David E -- Zuber, Maria T -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Nov 8;342(6159):724-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1243224.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Universite Paris Diderot, Case 7011, Lamarck A, 5, 35 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24202170" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-11-11
    Description: The origin of lunar magnetic anomalies remains unresolved after their discovery more than four decades ago. A commonly invoked hypothesis is that the Moon might once have possessed a thermally driven core dynamo, but this theory is problematical given the small size of the core and the required surface magnetic field strengths. An alternative hypothesis is that impact events might have amplified ambient fields near the antipodes of the largest basins, but many magnetic anomalies exist that are not associated with basin antipodes. Here we propose a new model for magnetic field generation, in which dynamo action comes from impact-induced changes in the Moon's rotation rate. Basin-forming impact events are energetic enough to have unlocked the Moon from synchronous rotation, and we demonstrate that the subsequent large-scale fluid flows in the core, excited by the tidal distortion of the core-mantle boundary, could have powered a lunar dynamo. Predicted surface magnetic field strengths are on the order of several microteslas, consistent with palaeomagnetic measurements, and the duration of these fields is sufficient to explain the central magnetic anomalies associated with several large impact basins.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Le Bars, M -- Wieczorek, M A -- Karatekin, O -- Cebron, D -- Laneuville, M -- England -- Nature. 2011 Nov 9;479(7372):215-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10565.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉IRPHE, CNRS and Aix-Marseille Universite, 49 rue F. Joliot Curie, BP 146, 13384 Marseille Cedex 13, France. lebars@irphe.univ-mrs.fr〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22071767" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-25
    Description: The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon and the bombardment history of the early Solar System.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Siegler, M A -- Miller, R S -- Keane, J T -- Laneuville, M -- Paige, D A -- Matsuyama, I -- Lawrence, D J -- Crotts, A -- Poston, M J -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 24;531(7595):480-4. doi: 10.1038/nature17166.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, Arizona 85719, USA. ; Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275, USA. ; University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899, USA. ; Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA. ; Earth Life Sciences Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551, Japan. ; University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland 20723, USA. ; Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27008966" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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