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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-08-07
    Description: Two million infants die each year from infectious diseases before they reach 12 mo; many of these diseases are vaccine preventable in older populations. Pattern recognition receptors represent the critical front-line defense against pathogens. Evidence suggests that the innate immune system does not fully develop until puberty, contributing to impaired response to infection and impaired vaccine responses in neonates, infants, and children. The activity of the pattern recognition receptor family of cytosolic nucleic acid (CNA) sensors in this pediatric population has not been reported. We show that in direct contrast to weak TLR-induced type I IFN in human cord blood mononuclear cells, cord blood mononuclear cells are capable of initiating a potent response to CNA, inducing both antiviral type I IFN and, unexpectedly, proinflammatory TNF-α. A deficiency in Rab11-GTPase endosome formation and consequent lack of IRF3 activation in neonatal monocytes is at least in part responsible for the marked disparity in TLR-induced IFN production between neonatal and adult monocytes. CNA receptors do not rely on endosome formation, and therefore, these responses remain intact in neonates. Heightened neonatal responses to CNA challenge are maintained in children up to 2 y of age and, in marked contrast to TLR4/9 agonists, result in IL-12p70 and IFN- generation. CNA sensors induce robust antiviral and proinflammatory pathways in neonates and children and possess great potential for use as immunostimulants or vaccine adjuvants for targeted neonatal and pediatric populations to promote cell-mediated immunity against invasive infectious disease.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-05-15
    Description: A novel Ebola virus (EBOV) first identified in March 2014 has infected more than 25,000 people in West Africa, resulting in more than 10,000 deaths. Preliminary analyses of genome sequences of 81 EBOV collected from March to June 2014 from Guinea and Sierra Leone suggest that the 2014 EBOV originated from an independent transmission event from its natural reservoir followed by sustained human-to-human infections. It has been reported that the EBOV genome variation might have an effect on the efficacy of sequence-based virus detection and candidate therapeutics. However, only limited viral information has been available since July 2014, when the outbreak entered a rapid growth phase. Here we describe 175 full-length EBOV genome sequences from five severely stricken districts in Sierra Leone from 28 September to 11 November 2014. We found that the 2014 EBOV has become more phylogenetically and genetically diverse from July to November 2014, characterized by the emergence of multiple novel lineages. The substitution rate for the 2014 EBOV was estimated to be 1.23 x 10(-3) substitutions per site per year (95% highest posterior density interval, 1.04 x 10(-3) to 1.41 x 10(-3) substitutions per site per year), approximating to that observed between previous EBOV outbreaks. The sharp increase in genetic diversity of the 2014 EBOV warrants extensive EBOV surveillance in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia to better understand the viral evolution and transmission dynamics of the ongoing outbreak. These data will facilitate the international efforts to develop vaccines and therapeutics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tong, Yi-Gang -- Shi, Wei-Feng -- Liu, Di -- Qian, Jun -- Liang, Long -- Bo, Xiao-Chen -- Liu, Jun -- Ren, Hong-Guang -- Fan, Hang -- Ni, Ming -- Sun, Yang -- Jin, Yuan -- Teng, Yue -- Li, Zhen -- Kargbo, David -- Dafae, Foday -- Kanu, Alex -- Chen, Cheng-Chao -- Lan, Zhi-Heng -- Jiang, Hui -- Luo, Yang -- Lu, Hui-Jun -- Zhang, Xiao-Guang -- Yang, Fan -- Hu, Yi -- Cao, Yu-Xi -- Deng, Yong-Qiang -- Su, Hao-Xiang -- Sun, Yu -- Liu, Wen-Sen -- Wang, Zhuang -- Wang, Cheng-Yu -- Bu, Zhao-Yang -- Guo, Zhen-Dong -- Zhang, Liu-Bo -- Nie, Wei-Min -- Bai, Chang-Qing -- Sun, Chun-Hua -- An, Xiao-Ping -- Xu, Pei-Song -- Zhang, Xiang-Li-Lan -- Huang, Yong -- Mi, Zhi-Qiang -- Yu, Dong -- Yao, Hong-Wu -- Feng, Yong -- Xia, Zhi-Ping -- Zheng, Xue-Xing -- Yang, Song-Tao -- Lu, Bing -- Jiang, Jia-Fu -- Kargbo, Brima -- He, Fu-Chu -- Gao, George F -- Cao, Wu-Chun -- China Mobile Laboratory Testing Team in Sierra Leone -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 6;524(7563):93-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14490. Epub 2015 May 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing 100071, China. ; Institute of Pathogen Biology, Taishan Medical College, Taian 271000, China. ; Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122, China. ; Beijing Key Laboratory of New Molecular Diagnostics Technology, Beijing 100850, China. ; Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China. ; Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone. ; Sierra Leone-China Friendship Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ; Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences &Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China. ; Institute of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100021, China. ; The No. 302 Hospital, Beijing 100039, China. ; The No. 307 Hospital, Beijing 100071, China. ; Department of international cooperation, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Beijing 100044, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing 102206, China. ; 1] Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China [2] Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China [3] Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25970247" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-14
    Description: Cytokines are often used as adjuvants to improve vaccine immunogenicity, since they are important in initiating and shaping the immune response. The available commercial modified live-attenuated vaccines (MLVs) against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are unable to mount sufficient heterologous protection, as they typically induce weak innate and inadequate T cell responses. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy of recombinant PRRSV MLVs incorporated with the porcine cytokine interleukin-15 (IL-15) or IL-18 gene fused to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification signal that can anchor the cytokines to the cell membrane. We demonstrated that both cytokines were successfully expressed on the cell membrane of porcine alveolar macrophages after infection with recombinant MLVs. Pigs vaccinated with recombinant MLVs or the parental Suvaxyn MLV had significantly reduced lung lesions and viral RNA loads in the lungs after heterologous challenge with the PRRSV NADC20 strain. The recombinant MLVs SUV-IL-15 and SUV-IL-18 recovered the inhibition of the NK cell response seen with Suvaxyn MLV. The recombinant MLV SUV-IL-15 significantly increased the numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-)-producing cells in circulation at 49 days postvaccination (dpv), especially for IFN--producing CD4 – CD8 + T cells and T cells, compared to the Suvaxyn MLV and SUV-IL-18. Additionally, MLV SUV-IL-15-vaccinated pigs also had elevated levels of T cell responses observed at 7 dpv, 49 dpv, and 7 days postchallenge. These data demonstrate that the recombinant MLV expressing membrane-bound IL-15 enhances NK and T cell immune responses after vaccination and confers improved heterologous protection, although this was not statistically significant compared to the parental MLV. IMPORTANCE Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has arguably been the most economically important global swine disease, causing immense economic losses worldwide. The available commercial modified live-attenuated vaccines (MLVs) against PRRS virus (PRRSV) are generally effective against only homologous or closely related virus strains but are ineffective against heterologous strains, partially due to the insufficient immune response induced by the vaccine virus. To improve the immunogenicity of MLVs, in this study, we present a novel approach of using porcine IL-15 or IL-18 as an adjuvant by directly incorporating its encoding gene into a PRRSV MLV and expressing it as an adjuvant. Importantly, we directed the expression of the incorporated cytokines to the cell membrane surface by fusing the genes with a membrane-targeting signal from CD59. The recombinant MLV virus expressing the membrane-bound IL-15 cytokine greatly enhanced NK cell and T cell responses and also conferred improved protection against heterologous challenge with the PRRSV NADC20 strain.
    Print ISSN: 0022-538X
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-5514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-01-07
    Description: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous and clinically aggressive disease for which there is no targeted therapy. BET bromodomain inhibitors, which have shown efficacy in several models of cancer, have not been evaluated in TNBC. These inhibitors displace BET bromodomain proteins such as BRD4 from chromatin by competing with their acetyl-lysine recognition modules, leading to inhibition of oncogenic transcriptional programs. Here we report the preferential sensitivity of TNBCs to BET bromodomain inhibition in vitro and in vivo, establishing a rationale for clinical investigation and further motivation to understand mechanisms of resistance. In paired cell lines selected for acquired resistance to BET inhibition from previously sensitive TNBCs, we failed to identify gatekeeper mutations, new driver events or drug pump activation. BET-resistant TNBC cells remain dependent on wild-type BRD4, which supports transcription and cell proliferation in a bromodomain-independent manner. Proteomic studies of resistant TNBC identify strong association with MED1 and hyper-phosphorylation of BRD4 attributable to decreased activity of PP2A, identified here as a principal BRD4 serine phosphatase. Together, these studies provide a rationale for BET inhibition in TNBC and present mechanism-based combination strategies to anticipate clinical drug resistance.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Shu, Shaokun -- Lin, Charles Y -- He, Housheng Hansen -- Witwicki, Robert M -- Tabassum, Doris P -- Roberts, Justin M -- Janiszewska, Michalina -- Huh, Sung Jin -- Liang, Yi -- Ryan, Jeremy -- Doherty, Ernest -- Mohammed, Hisham -- Guo, Hao -- Stover, Daniel G -- Ekram, Muhammad B -- Peluffo, Guillermo -- Brown, Jonathan -- D'Santos, Clive -- Krop, Ian E -- Dillon, Deborah -- McKeown, Michael -- Ott, Christopher -- Qi, Jun -- Ni, Min -- Rao, Prakash K -- Duarte, Melissa -- Wu, Shwu-Yuan -- Chiang, Cheng-Ming -- Anders, Lars -- Young, Richard A -- Winer, Eric P -- Letai, Antony -- Barry, William T -- Carroll, Jason S -- Long, Henry W -- Brown, Myles -- Liu, X Shirley -- Meyer, Clifford A -- Bradner, James E -- Polyak, Kornelia -- CA080111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA103867/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA120184/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA168504/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA168504/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103867/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Jan 21;529(7586):413-7. doi: 10.1038/nature16508. Epub 2016 Jan 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G1L7, Canada. ; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9, Canada. ; Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Departments of Biochemistry and Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26735014" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-04-20
    Description: Platelets have long been recognized as key players in hemostasis and thrombosis; however, growing evidence suggests that they are also significantly involved in cancer, the second leading cause of mortality worldwide. Preclinical and clinical studies showed that tumorigenesis and metastasis can be promoted by platelets through a wide variety of crosstalk between platelets and cancer cells. For example, cancer changes platelet behavior by directly inducing tumor-platelet aggregates, triggering platelet granule and extracellular vesicle release, altering platelet phenotype and platelet RNA profiles, and enhancing thrombopoiesis. Reciprocally, platelets reinforce tumor growth with proliferation signals, antiapoptotic effect, and angiogenic factors. Platelets also activate tumor invasion and sustain metastasis via inducing an invasive epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype of tumor cells, promoting tumor survival in circulation, tumor arrest at the endothelium, and extravasation. Furthermore, platelets assist tumors in evading immune destruction. Hence, cancer cells and platelets maintain a complex, bidirectional communication. Recently, aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has been recognized as a promising cancer-preventive agent. It is recommended at daily low dose by the US Preventive Services Task Force for primary prevention of colorectal cancer. The exact mechanisms of action of aspirin in chemoprevention are not very clear, but evidence has emerged that suggests a platelet-mediated effect. In this article, we will introduce how cancer changes platelets to be more cancer-friendly and highlight advances in the modes of action for aspirin in cancer prevention. We also discuss the opportunities, challenges, and opposing viewpoints on applying aspirin and other antiplatelet agents for cancer prevention and treatment.
    Keywords: Perspectives, Platelets and Thrombopoiesis
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Cancer cells induce a set of adaptive response pathways to survive in the face of stressors due to inadequate vascularization. One such adaptive pathway is the unfolded protein (UPR) or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response mediated in part by the ER-localized transmembrane sensor IRE1 (ref. 2) and its substrate XBP1 (ref. 3). Previous studies report UPR activation in various human tumours, but the role of XBP1 in cancer progression in mammary epithelial cells is largely unknown. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)--a form of breast cancer in which tumour cells do not express the genes for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2 (also called ERBB2 or NEU)--is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Here we report that XBP1 is activated in TNBC and has a pivotal role in the tumorigenicity and progression of this human breast cancer subtype. In breast cancer cell line models, depletion of XBP1 inhibited tumour growth and tumour relapse and reduced the CD44(high)CD24(low) population. Hypoxia-inducing factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha) is known to be hyperactivated in TNBCs. Genome-wide mapping of the XBP1 transcriptional regulatory network revealed that XBP1 drives TNBC tumorigenicity by assembling a transcriptional complex with HIF1alpha that regulates the expression of HIF1alpha targets via the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Analysis of independent cohorts of patients with TNBC revealed a specific XBP1 gene expression signature that was highly correlated with HIF1alpha and hypoxia-driven signatures and that strongly associated with poor prognosis. Our findings reveal a key function for the XBP1 branch of the UPR in TNBC and indicate that targeting this pathway may offer alternative treatment strategies for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105133/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105133/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Xi -- Iliopoulos, Dimitrios -- Zhang, Qing -- Tang, Qianzi -- Greenblatt, Matthew B -- Hatziapostolou, Maria -- Lim, Elgene -- Tam, Wai Leong -- Ni, Min -- Chen, Yiwen -- Mai, Junhua -- Shen, Haifa -- Hu, Dorothy Z -- Adoro, Stanley -- Hu, Bella -- Song, Minkyung -- Tan, Chen -- Landis, Melissa D -- Ferrari, Mauro -- Shin, Sandra J -- Brown, Myles -- Chang, Jenny C -- Liu, X Shirley -- Glimcher, Laurie H -- AI32412/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA112663/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99 CA175290/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99CA175290/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016086/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA160351/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI032412/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA112663/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004069/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004069/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 3;508(7494):103-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13119. Epub 2014 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center of Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Center for Systems Biomedicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [2] Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3]. ; 1] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Bioinformatics, School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China [2] Institute of Animal Genetics and Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, Sichuan 625014, China [3]. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Center for Systems Biomedicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [2] Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Endocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Houston Methodist Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Houston Methodist Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670641" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD24/metabolism ; Antigens, CD44/metabolism ; Cell Hypoxia/genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Disease Progression ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Gene Silencing ; Humans ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/*metabolism ; Mice ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local ; Prognosis ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic ; Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms/blood supply/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Unfolded Protein Response
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-08-27
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tong, Yi-Gang -- Shi, Wei-Feng -- Liu, Di -- Qian, Jun -- Liang, Long -- Bo, Xiao-Chen -- Liu, Jun -- Ren, Hong-Guang -- Fan, Hang -- Ni, Ming -- Sun, Yang -- Jin, Yuan -- Teng, Yue -- Li, Zhen -- Kargbo, David -- Dafae, Foday -- Kanu, Alex -- Chen, Cheng-Chao -- Lan, Zhi-Heng -- Jiang, Hui -- Luo, Yang -- Lu, Hui-Jun -- Zhang, Xiao-Guang -- Yang, Fan -- Hu, Yi -- Cao, Yu-Xi -- Deng, Yong-Qiang -- Su, Hao-Xiang -- Sun, Yu -- Liu, Wen-Sen -- Wang, Zhuang -- Wang, Cheng-Yu -- Bu, Zhao-Yang -- Guo, Zhen-Dong -- Zhang, Liu-Bo -- Nie, Wei-Min -- Bai, Chang-Qing -- Sun, Chun-Hua -- An, Xiao-Ping -- Xu, Pei-Song -- Zhang, Xiang-Li-Lan -- Huang, Yong -- Mi, Zhi-Qiang -- Yu, Dong -- Yao, Hong-Wu -- Feng, Yong -- Xia, Zhi-Ping -- Zheng, Xue-Xing -- Yang, Song-Tao -- Lu, Bing -- Jiang, Jia-Fu -- Kargbo, Brima -- He, Fu-Chu -- Gao, George F -- Cao, Wu-Chun -- China Mobile Laboratory Testing Team in Sierra Leone -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 22;526(7574):595. doi: 10.1038/nature15255. Epub 2015 Aug 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308898" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-01-17
    Description: Purpose: KRAS mutations occur in approximately 25% of patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the uniform presence of KRAS mutations, patients with KRAS -mutant NSCLC can have a heterogeneous clinical course. As the pattern of co-occurring mutations may describe different biological subsets of patients with KRAS -mutant lung adenocarcinoma, we explored the effects of co-occurring mutations on patient outcomes and response to therapy. Experimental Design: We identified patients with advanced KRAS -mutant NSCLC and evaluated the most common co-occurring genomic alterations. Multivariate analyses were performed incorporating the most frequent co-mutations and clinical characteristics to evaluate association with overall survival as well as response to platinum–pemetrexed chemotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Results: Among 330 patients with advanced KRAS -mutant lung cancers, the most frequent co-mutations were found in TP53 (42%), STK11 (29%), and KEAP1 / NFE2L2 (27%). In a multivariate analysis, there was a significantly shorter survival in patients with co-mutations in KEAP1 / NFE2L2 [HR, 1.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.33–2.92; P ≤ 0.001]. STK11 (HR, 1.3; P = 0.22) and TP53 (HR 1.11, P = 0.58) co-mutation statuses were not associated with survival. Co-mutation in KEAP1 / NFE2L2 was also associated with shorter duration of initial chemotherapy (HR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.04–2.59; P = 0.03) and shorter overall survival from initiation of immune therapy (HR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.55–8.11; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Among people with KRAS -mutant advanced NSCLC, TP53, STK11 , and KEAP1 / NFE2L2 are the most commonly co-occurring somatic genomic alterations. Co-mutation of KRAS and KEAP1 / NFE2L2 is an independent prognostic factor, predicting shorter survival, duration of response to initial platinum-based chemotherapy, and survival from the start of immune therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 24(2); 334–40. ©2017 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 9
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  64. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC); 20130526-20130529; Düsseldorf; DOCP 014 /20130521/
    Publication Date: 2013-05-22
    Keywords: growth hormone(GH) ; microadenoma ; empty sella ; ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1573-2878
    Keywords: Failure-detection systems ; observes ; adaptive observers
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Mathematics
    Notes: Abstract A stability theorem for failure-detection systems, previously published in Ref. 1, is shown to be incomplete.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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