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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-03-25
    Description: B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling strength: attenuation below minimum (for example, non-functional BCR) or hyperactivation above maximum (for example, self-reactive BCR) thresholds of signalling strength causes negative selection. In approximately 25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Philadelphia chromosome positive), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signalling. Current therapeutic approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signalling below a minimum threshold for survival. We tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation--above a maximum threshold--will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Here we find, by testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signalling in mouse BCR-ABL1 cells, that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signalling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn6 (ref. 7) and Inpp5d (ref. 8). Using a novel small-molecule inhibitor of INPP5D (also known as SHIP1), we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B-cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4441554/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4441554/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Zhengshan -- Shojaee, Seyedmehdi -- Buchner, Maike -- Geng, Huimin -- Lee, Jae Woong -- Klemm, Lars -- Titz, Bjorn -- Graeber, Thomas G -- Park, Eugene -- Tan, Ying Xim -- Satterthwaite, Anne -- Paietta, Elisabeth -- Hunger, Stephen P -- Willman, Cheryl L -- Melnick, Ari -- Loh, Mignon L -- Jung, Jae U -- Coligan, John E -- Bolland, Silvia -- Mak, Tak W -- Limnander, Andre -- Jumaa, Hassan -- Reth, Michael -- Weiss, Arthur -- Lowell, Clifford A -- Muschen, Markus -- 101880/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- CA180794/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA180820/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI068150/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI113272/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA137060/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA139032/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA157644/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA169458/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA172558/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA137060/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA139032/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA157644/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA169458/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA172558/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA157937/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U10 CA180794/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U10 CA180820/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U10 CA180827/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U10 CA180886/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA114737/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA196172/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 21;521(7552):357-61. doi: 10.1038/nature14231. Epub 2015 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Rosalind Russell-Ephraim P. Engleman Medical Research Center for Arthritis, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10466, USA. ; Division of Pediatric Oncology and Center for Childhood Cancer Research, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Philadelphia 19104, USA. ; University of New Mexico Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87102, USA. ; Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033, USA. ; Receptor Cell Biology Section, Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. ; Autoimmunity and Functional Genomics Section, Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. ; The Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, University Health Network, 620 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. ; Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Institute of Immunology, University Clinics Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany. ; BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies and Faculty of Biology, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat Freiburg, and MPI of Immunbiologie and Epigenetics, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25799995" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs/genetics ; Animals ; Antigens, CD/metabolism ; Antigens, CD31/metabolism ; B-Lymphocytes/drug effects/*metabolism/*pathology ; Cell Death/drug effects ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Disease Models, Animal ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects ; Enzyme Activation/drug effects ; Female ; Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl/genetics ; Gene Deletion ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/agonists/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred NOD ; Mice, SCID ; Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug ; therapy/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Precursor Cells, B-Lymphoid/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism ; Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Receptors, Immunologic/genetics/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Tyrosine/metabolism ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-02-18
    Description: Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are widely studied by HSC transplantation into immune- and blood-cell-depleted recipients. Single HSCs can rebuild the system after transplantation. Chromosomal marking, viral integration and barcoding of transplanted HSCs suggest that very low numbers of HSCs perpetuate a continuous stream of differentiating cells. However, the numbers of productive HSCs during normal haematopoiesis, and the flux of differentiating progeny remain unknown. Here we devise a mouse model allowing inducible genetic labelling of the most primitive Tie2(+) HSCs in bone marrow, and quantify label progression along haematopoietic development by limiting dilution analysis and data-driven modelling. During maintenance of the haematopoietic system, at least 30% or approximately 5,000 HSCs are productive in the adult mouse after label induction. However, the time to approach equilibrium between labelled HSCs and their progeny is surprisingly long, a time scale that would exceed the mouse's life. Indeed, we find that adult haematopoiesis is largely sustained by previously designated 'short-term' stem cells downstream of HSCs that nearly fully self-renew, and receive rare but polyclonal HSC input. By contrast, in fetal and early postnatal life, HSCs are rapidly used to establish the immune and blood system. In the adult mouse, 5-fluoruracil-induced leukopenia enhances the output of HSCs and of downstream compartments, thus accelerating haematopoietic flux. Label tracing also identifies a strong lineage bias in adult mice, with several-hundred-fold larger myeloid than lymphoid output, which is only marginally accentuated with age. Finally, we show that transplantation imposes severe constraints on HSC engraftment, consistent with the previously observed oligoclonal HSC activity under these conditions. Thus, we uncover fundamental differences between the normal maintenance of the haematopoietic system, its regulation by challenge, and its re-establishment after transplantation. HSC fate mapping and its linked modelling provide a quantitative framework for studying in situ the regulation of haematopoiesis in health and disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Busch, Katrin -- Klapproth, Kay -- Barile, Melania -- Flossdorf, Michael -- Holland-Letz, Tim -- Schlenner, Susan M -- Reth, Michael -- Hofer, Thomas -- Rodewald, Hans-Reimer -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 26;518(7540):542-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14242. Epub 2015 Feb 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Cellular Immunology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Division of Theoretical Systems Biology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Division of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium [2] Autoimmune Genetics Laboratory, VIB, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; 1] BIOSS, Centre For Biological Signaling Studies, University of Freiburg, Schanzlestrasse 18, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany [2] Department of Molecular Immunology, BioIII, Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, and Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Stubeweg 51, D-79108 Freiburg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25686605" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging ; Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Bone Marrow Transplantation ; Cell Lineage/*physiology ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Tracking ; Female ; Fetus/cytology/embryology ; Fluorouracil ; *Hematopoiesis ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Receptor, TIE-2/metabolism ; Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-10
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Zhengshan -- Shojaee, Seyedmehdi -- Buchner, Maike -- Geng, Huimin -- Lee, Jae Woong -- Klemm, Lars -- Titz, Bjorn -- Graeber, Thomas G -- Park, Eugene -- Tan, Ying Xim -- Satterthwaite, Anne -- Paietta, Elisabeth -- Hunger, Stephen P -- Willman, Cheryl L -- Melnick, Ari -- Loh, Mignon L -- Jung, Jae U -- Coligan, John E -- Bolland, Silvia -- Mak, Tak W -- Limnander, Andre -- Jumaa, Hassan -- Reth, Michael -- Weiss, Arthur -- Lowell, Clifford A -- Muschen, Markus -- Nature. 2016 Mar 9. doi: 10.1038/nature16997.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26958840" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; EXPRESSION ; SYSTEM ; GENE ; MOUSE ; CLONAL ANALYSIS ; PROGENITORS ; RECONSTITUTION ; compartment ; MARROW
    Abstract: Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are widely studied by HSC transplantation into immune- and blood-cell-depleted recipients. Single HSCs can rebuild the system after transplantation(1-5). Chromosomal marking', viral integration(7-9) and barcoding' of transplanted HSCs suggest that very low numbers of HSCs perpetuate a continuous stream of differentiating cells. However, the numbers of productive HSCs during normal haematopoiesis, and the flux of differentiating progeny remain unknown. Here we devise a mouse model allowing inducible genetic labelling of the most primitive Tie(2+) HSCs in bone marrow, and quantify label progression along haematopoietic development by limiting dilution analysis and data-driven modelling. During maintenance of the haematopoietic system, at least 30% or 5,000 HSCs are productive in the adult mouse after label induction. However, the time to approach equilibrium between labelled HSCs and their progeny is surprisingly long, a time scale that would exceed the mouse's life. Indeed, we find that adult haematopoiesis is largely 'sustained by previously designated 'short-term' stem cells downstream of HSCs that nearly fully self-renew, and receive rare but polydonal HSC input. By contrast, in fetal and early postnatal life, HSCs are rapidly used to establish the immune and blood system. In the adult mouse, 5-fluoruracil-induced leukopenia enhances the output of HSCs and of downstream compartments, thus accelerating haematopoietic flux. Label tracing also identifies a strong lineage bias in adult mice, with several-hundred-fold larger myeloid than lymphoid output, which is only marginally accentuated with age. Finally, we show that transplantation imposes severe constraints on HSC engraftment, consistent with the previously observed oligodonal HSC activity under these conditions. Thus, we uncover fundamental differences between the normal maintenance of the haematopoietic system, its regulation by challenge, and its re-establishment after transplantation. HSC fate mapping and its linked modelling provide a quantitative framework for studying in situ the regulation of haematopoiesis in health and disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25686605
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  • 5
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    Nature Immunology 11 (3), 191-192 
    Keywords: Germany ; ACTIVATION ; NADPH OXIDASE ; OXYGEN ; signaling ; PROTEIN-TYROSINE PHOSPHATASES ; ROS ; B-CELL ; LOOP ; PROTON CHANNELS
    Abstract: Transient formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanies B cell signaling and activation. Now the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 has been linked to ROS formation and B cell activation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20157299
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Nature 433, 647–653 (2005) It has been drawn to Nature’s attention that K.R.C., S.E., C.-L.C., A.M. and K.-L.L. filed a patent application relevant to this work (patent number WO 2004/070013) in 2004, which should therefore have ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1749-6632
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 290 (1981), S. 257-259 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] We developed previously, by the Kohler-Milstein cell hybridization technique7, a series of monoclonal antibodies of mouse origin each of which recognizes a particular idiotope characteristic for a subset of anti-NP (NP = 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl-acetyl) antibodies of C57BL/6 mice8. When IgG1 ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Palo Alto, Calif. : Annual Reviews
    Annual Review of Immunology 15 (1997), S. 453-479 
    ISSN: 0732-0582
    Source: Annual Reviews Electronic Back Volume Collection 1932-2001ff
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Current models of signal transduction from the antigen receptors on B and T cells still resemble equations with several unknown elements. Data from recent knock-out experiments in cell lines and mice contradict the assumption that Src-family kinase and tyrosine kinases of the Syk/Zap-70 family are the transducer elements that set signaling from these receptors in motion. Using a functional definition of signaling elements, we discuss the current knowledge of signaling events from the BCR and suggest the existence of an as-yet-unknown BCR transducer complex.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Palo Alto, Calif. : Annual Reviews
    Annual Review of Immunology 10 (1992), S. 97-121 
    ISSN: 0732-0582
    Source: Annual Reviews Electronic Back Volume Collection 1932-2001ff
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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