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  • 1
    Keywords: LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; INITIATION ; DEPENDENCE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; Adolescent ; NICOTINIC RECEPTOR GENES ; HEAVY SMOKING ; ADULT RATS
    Abstract: Context: Recent studies have shown an association between cigarettes per day (CPD) and a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism in CHRNA5, rs16969968. Objective: To determine whether the association between rs16969968 and smoking is modified by age at onset of regular smoking. Data Sources: Primary data. Study Selection: Available genetic studies containing measures of CPD and the genotype of rs16969968 or its proxy. DataExtraction: Uniform statistical analysis scripts were runlocally. Starting with 94 050 ever-smokers from 43 studies, we extracted the heavy smokers (CPD 〉20) and light smokers (CPD 〈= 10) with age-at-onset information, re-ducing the sample size to 33 348. Each study was stratified into early-onset smokers (age at onset 〈= 16 years) and late-onset smokers (age at onset 〉16 years), and a logistic regression of heavy vs light smoking with ther s16969968 genotype was computed for each stratum. Meta-analysis was performed within each age-at-onset stratum. Data Synthesis: Individuals with 1 risk allele at rs16969968 who were early-onset smokers were significantly more likely to be heavy smokers in adulthood (odds ratio [OR]=1.45; 95% CI, 1.36-1.55; n=13 843) than were carriers of the risk allele who were late-onset smokers (OR=1.27; 95% CI, 1.21-1.33, n=19 505) (P=.01). Conclusion: These results highlight an increased genetic vulnerability to smoking in early-onset smokers.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22868939
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-06-24
    Description: More than half of the world's population now lives in cities, making the creation of a healthy urban environment a major policy priority. Cities have both health risks and benefits, but mental health is negatively affected: mood and anxiety disorders are more prevalent in city dwellers and the incidence of schizophrenia is strongly increased in people born and raised in cities. Although these findings have been widely attributed to the urban social environment, the neural processes that could mediate such associations are unknown. Here we show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in three independent experiments, that urban upbringing and city living have dissociable impacts on social evaluative stress processing in humans. Current city living was associated with increased amygdala activity, whereas urban upbringing affected the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex, a key region for regulation of amygdala activity, negative affect and stress. These findings were regionally and behaviourally specific, as no other brain structures were affected and no urbanicity effect was seen during control experiments invoking cognitive processing without stress. Our results identify distinct neural mechanisms for an established environmental risk factor, link the urban environment for the first time to social stress processing, suggest that brain regions differ in vulnerability to this risk factor across the lifespan, and indicate that experimental interrogation of epidemiological associations is a promising strategy in social neuroscience.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lederbogen, Florian -- Kirsch, Peter -- Haddad, Leila -- Streit, Fabian -- Tost, Heike -- Schuch, Philipp -- Wust, Stefan -- Pruessner, Jens C -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Deuschle, Michael -- Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jun 22;474(7352):498-501. doi: 10.1038/nature10190.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg/Medical Faculty Mannheim, 68159 Mannheim, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21697947" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/*physiology ; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology ; *Cities/epidemiology ; Gyrus Cinguli/*physiology ; Humans ; Hydrocortisone/blood ; *Life Style ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Mental Health/statistics & numerical data ; Models, Neurological ; Mood Disorders/epidemiology ; Rural Health/statistics & numerical data ; Sample Size ; Schizophrenia/epidemiology ; Stress, Psychological/blood/epidemiology/*physiopathology ; Time Factors ; Urban Health/statistics & numerical data ; Urbanization
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: A comprehensive account of the causes of alcohol misuse must accommodate individual differences in biology, psychology and environment, and must disentangle cause and effect. Animal models can demonstrate the effects of neurotoxic substances; however, they provide limited insight into the psycho-social and higher cognitive factors involved in the initiation of substance use and progression to misuse. One can search for pre-existing risk factors by testing for endophenotypic biomarkers in non-using relatives; however, these relatives may have personality or neural resilience factors that protect them from developing dependence. A longitudinal study has potential to identify predictors of adolescent substance misuse, particularly if it can incorporate a wide range of potential causal factors, both proximal and distal, and their influence on numerous social, psychological and biological mechanisms. Here we apply machine learning to a wide range of data from a large sample of adolescents (n = 692) to generate models of current and future adolescent alcohol misuse that incorporate brain structure and function, individual personality and cognitive differences, environmental factors (including gestational cigarette and alcohol exposure), life experiences, and candidate genes. These models were accurate and generalized to novel data, and point to life experiences, neurobiological differences and personality as important antecedents of binge drinking. By identifying the vulnerability factors underlying individual differences in alcohol misuse, these models shed light on the aetiology of alcohol misuse and suggest targets for prevention.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486207/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4486207/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Whelan, Robert -- Watts, Richard -- Orr, Catherine A -- Althoff, Robert R -- Artiges, Eric -- Banaschewski, Tobias -- Barker, Gareth J -- Bokde, Arun L W -- Buchel, Christian -- Carvalho, Fabiana M -- Conrod, Patricia J -- Flor, Herta -- Fauth-Buhler, Mira -- Frouin, Vincent -- Gallinat, Juergen -- Gan, Gabriela -- Gowland, Penny -- Heinz, Andreas -- Ittermann, Bernd -- Lawrence, Claire -- Mann, Karl -- Martinot, Jean-Luc -- Nees, Frauke -- Ortiz, Nick -- Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure -- Paus, Tomas -- Pausova, Zdenka -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Robbins, Trevor W -- Smolka, Michael N -- Strohle, Andreas -- Schumann, Gunter -- Garavan, Hugh -- IMAGEN Consortium -- MH082116/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- P20 GM103644/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P20GM103644/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 DA036114/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P50DA036114/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2014 Aug 14;512(7513):185-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13402. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland. ; Department of Radiology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Department of Pediatrics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging &Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, 91400 Orsay, France [2] Department of Psychiatry, Orsay Hospital, 4 place du General Leclerc, 91400 Orsay, France. ; Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] Department of Systems Neuroscience, Universitatsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; 1] Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK [2] Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal H3T 1C5, Canada. ; 1] Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany [2] Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany. ; 14 CEA, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin bat 145, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette, France. ; 1] Department of Systems Neuroscience, Universitatsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany. ; Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universitat Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany. ; Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 10587 Berlin, Germany. ; School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK. ; 1] Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM CEA Unit 1000 "Imaging &Psychiatry", University Paris Sud, 91400 Orsay, France [2] AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin 10117, Germany [2] AP-HP Department of Adolescent Psychopathology and Medicine, Maison de Solenn, University Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France. ; 1] Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5R 0A3, Canada [2] Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, H3A 2B4, Canada. ; The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A4, Canada. ; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; 1] Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK [2] MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, London WC2R 2LS, UK. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [2] Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA [3] Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043041" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Alcohol Drinking/*psychology ; Alcoholism/genetics/prevention & control/*psychology ; Artificial Intelligence ; Brain/physiology ; Cognition/physiology ; Environment ; Humans ; Life Change Events ; Longitudinal Studies ; *Models, Theoretical ; Personality/physiology ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Psychology ; Reproducibility of Results ; Risk Factors
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-01-22
    Description: The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 x 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393366/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393366/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hibar, Derrek P -- Stein, Jason L -- Renteria, Miguel E -- Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro -- Desrivieres, Sylvane -- Jahanshad, Neda -- Toro, Roberto -- Wittfeld, Katharina -- Abramovic, Lucija -- Andersson, Micael -- Aribisala, Benjamin S -- Armstrong, Nicola J -- Bernard, Manon -- Bohlken, Marc M -- Boks, Marco P -- Bralten, Janita -- Brown, Andrew A -- Chakravarty, M Mallar -- Chen, Qiang -- Ching, Christopher R K -- Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel -- den Braber, Anouk -- Giddaluru, Sudheer -- Goldman, Aaron L -- Grimm, Oliver -- Guadalupe, Tulio -- Hass, Johanna -- Woldehawariat, Girma -- Holmes, Avram J -- Hoogman, Martine -- Janowitz, Deborah -- Jia, Tianye -- Kim, Sungeun -- Klein, Marieke -- Kraemer, Bernd -- Lee, Phil H -- Olde Loohuis, Loes M -- Luciano, Michelle -- Macare, Christine -- Mather, Karen A -- Mattheisen, Manuel -- Milaneschi, Yuri -- Nho, Kwangsik -- Papmeyer, Martina -- Ramasamy, Adaikalavan -- Risacher, Shannon L -- Roiz-Santianez, Roberto -- Rose, Emma J -- Salami, Alireza -- Samann, Philipp G -- Schmaal, Lianne -- Schork, Andrew J -- Shin, Jean -- Strike, Lachlan T -- Teumer, Alexander -- van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J -- van Eijk, Kristel R -- Walters, Raymond K -- Westlye, Lars T -- Whelan, Christopher D -- Winkler, Anderson M -- Zwiers, Marcel P -- Alhusaini, Saud -- Athanasiu, Lavinia -- Ehrlich, Stefan -- Hakobjan, Marina M H -- Hartberg, Cecilie B -- Haukvik, Unn K -- Heister, Angelien J G A M -- Hoehn, David -- Kasperaviciute, Dalia -- Liewald, David C M -- Lopez, Lorna M -- Makkinje, Remco R R -- Matarin, Mar -- Naber, Marlies A M -- McKay, D Reese -- Needham, Margaret -- Nugent, Allison C -- Putz, Benno -- Royle, Natalie A -- Shen, Li -- Sprooten, Emma -- Trabzuni, Daniah -- van der Marel, Saskia S L -- van Hulzen, Kimm J E -- Walton, Esther -- Wolf, Christiane -- Almasy, Laura -- Ames, David -- Arepalli, Sampath -- Assareh, Amelia A -- Bastin, Mark E -- Brodaty, Henry -- Bulayeva, Kazima B -- Carless, Melanie A -- Cichon, Sven -- Corvin, Aiden -- Curran, Joanne E -- Czisch, Michael -- de Zubicaray, Greig I -- Dillman, Allissa -- Duggirala, Ravi -- Dyer, Thomas D -- Erk, Susanne -- Fedko, Iryna O -- Ferrucci, Luigi -- Foroud, Tatiana M -- Fox, Peter T -- Fukunaga, Masaki -- Gibbs, J Raphael -- Goring, Harald H H -- Green, Robert C -- Guelfi, Sebastian -- Hansell, Narelle K -- Hartman, Catharina A -- Hegenscheid, Katrin -- Heinz, Andreas -- Hernandez, Dena G -- Heslenfeld, Dirk J -- Hoekstra, Pieter J -- Holsboer, Florian -- Homuth, Georg -- Hottenga, Jouke-Jan -- Ikeda, Masashi -- Jack, Clifford R Jr -- Jenkinson, Mark -- Johnson, Robert -- Kanai, Ryota -- Keil, Maria -- Kent, Jack W Jr -- Kochunov, Peter -- Kwok, John B -- Lawrie, Stephen M -- Liu, Xinmin -- Longo, Dan L -- McMahon, Katie L -- Meisenzahl, Eva -- Melle, Ingrid -- Mohnke, Sebastian -- Montgomery, Grant W -- Mostert, Jeanette C -- Muhleisen, Thomas W -- Nalls, Michael A -- Nichols, Thomas E -- Nilsson, Lars G -- Nothen, Markus M -- Ohi, Kazutaka -- Olvera, Rene L -- Perez-Iglesias, Rocio -- Pike, G Bruce -- Potkin, Steven G -- Reinvang, Ivar -- Reppermund, Simone -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina -- Rosen, Glenn D -- Rujescu, Dan -- Schnell, Knut -- Schofield, Peter R -- Smith, Colin -- Steen, Vidar M -- Sussmann, Jessika E -- Thalamuthu, Anbupalam -- Toga, Arthur W -- Traynor, Bryan J -- Troncoso, Juan -- Turner, Jessica A -- Valdes Hernandez, Maria C -- van 't Ent, Dennis -- van der Brug, Marcel -- van der Wee, Nic J A -- van Tol, Marie-Jose -- Veltman, Dick J -- Wassink, Thomas H -- Westman, Eric -- Zielke, Ronald H -- Zonderman, Alan B -- Ashbrook, David G -- Hager, Reinmar -- Lu, Lu -- McMahon, Francis J -- Morris, Derek W -- Williams, Robert W -- Brunner, Han G -- Buckner, Randy L -- Buitelaar, Jan K -- Cahn, Wiepke -- Calhoun, Vince D -- Cavalleri, Gianpiero L -- Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto -- Dale, Anders M -- Davies, Gareth E -- Delanty, Norman -- Depondt, Chantal -- Djurovic, Srdjan -- Drevets, Wayne C -- Espeseth, Thomas -- Gollub, Randy L -- Ho, Beng-Choon -- Hoffmann, Wolfgang -- Hosten, Norbert -- Kahn, Rene S -- Le Hellard, Stephanie -- Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas -- Muller-Myhsok, Bertram -- Nauck, Matthias -- Nyberg, Lars -- Pandolfo, Massimo -- Penninx, Brenda W J H -- Roffman, Joshua L -- Sisodiya, Sanjay M -- Smoller, Jordan W -- van Bokhoven, Hans -- van Haren, Neeltje E M -- Volzke, Henry -- Walter, Henrik -- Weiner, Michael W -- Wen, Wei -- White, Tonya -- Agartz, Ingrid -- Andreassen, Ole A -- Blangero, John -- Boomsma, Dorret I -- Brouwer, Rachel M -- Cannon, Dara M -- Cookson, Mark R -- de Geus, Eco J C -- Deary, Ian J -- Donohoe, Gary -- Fernandez, Guillen -- Fisher, Simon E -- Francks, Clyde -- Glahn, David C -- Grabe, Hans J -- Gruber, Oliver -- Hardy, John -- Hashimoto, Ryota -- Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E -- Jonsson, Erik G -- Kloszewska, Iwona -- Lovestone, Simon -- Mattay, Venkata S -- Mecocci, Patrizia -- McDonald, Colm -- McIntosh, Andrew M -- Ophoff, Roel A -- Paus, Tomas -- Pausova, Zdenka -- Ryten, Mina -- Sachdev, Perminder S -- Saykin, Andrew J -- Simmons, Andy -- Singleton, Andrew -- Soininen, Hilkka -- Wardlaw, Joanna M -- Weale, Michael E -- Weinberger, Daniel R -- Adams, Hieab H H -- Launer, Lenore J -- Seiler, Stephan -- Schmidt, Reinhold -- Chauhan, Ganesh -- Satizabal, Claudia L -- Becker, James T -- Yanek, Lisa -- van der Lee, Sven J -- Ebling, Maritza -- Fischl, Bruce -- Longstreth, W T Jr -- Greve, Douglas -- Schmidt, Helena -- Nyquist, Paul -- Vinke, Louis N -- van Duijn, Cornelia M -- Xue, Luting -- Mazoyer, Bernard -- Bis, Joshua C -- Gudnason, Vilmundur -- Seshadri, Sudha -- Ikram, M Arfan -- Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative -- CHARGE Consortium -- EPIGEN -- IMAGEN -- SYS -- Martin, Nicholas G -- Wright, Margaret J -- Schumann, Gunter -- Franke, Barbara -- Thompson, Paul M -- Medland, Sarah E -- 100309/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 104036/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/F019394/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0700704/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0701120/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G1001245/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- K99 LM011384/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- K99 MH101367/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MR/K026992/1/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P41 EB015922/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- P50 AG005133/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P50 AG005134/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P50 AG005146/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R00 LM011384/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG040060/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 EB015611/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- RF1 AG041915/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U01 AG049505/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U24 AG021886/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U54 EB020403/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR001108/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR001120/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 9;520(7546):224-9. doi: 10.1038/nature14101. Epub 2015 Jan 21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Imaging Genetics Center, Institute for Neuroimaging &Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90292, USA. ; 1] Imaging Genetics Center, Institute for Neuroimaging &Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90292, USA. [2] Neurogenetics Program, Department of Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia. ; 1] Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [3] Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [4] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. ; MRC-SGDP Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; 1] Laboratory of Human Genetics and Cognitive Functions, Institut Pasteur, Paris 75015, France. [2] Centre Nationale de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Unite de Recherche Associee (URA) 2182 Genes, Synapses and Cognition, Institut Pasteur, Paris 75015, France. [3] Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris 75015, France. ; 1] German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Rostock/Greifswald, Greifswald 17487, Germany. [2] Department of Psychiatry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17489, Germany. ; Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3584 CX, The Netherlands. ; Umea Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umea University, Umea 901 87, Sweden. ; 1] Brain Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. [2] Department of Computer Science, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria. [3] Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. ; 1] Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. [2] School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia. ; The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto M5G 1X8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [3] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. [2] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo 0424, Norway. ; 1] Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal H4H 1R3, Canada. [2] Department of Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 2B4, Canada. ; Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; 1] Imaging Genetics Center, Institute for Neuroimaging &Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90292, USA. [2] Interdepartmental Neuroscience Graduate Program, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Biological Psychology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam &EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University &VU Medical Center, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021 Bergen, Norway. [2] Dr. Einar Martens Research Group for Biological Psychiatry, Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen 5021, Norway. ; Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University Heidelberg, Mannheim 68159, Germany. ; 1] Language and Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen 6525 XD, The Netherlands. [2] International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, Nijmegen 6525 XD, The Netherlands. ; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden 01307 Germany. ; Human Genetics Branch and Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. ; Department of Psychiatry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17489, Germany. ; 1] Center for Neuroimaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [2] Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [3] Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; Center for Translational Research in Systems Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center, Goettingen 37075, Germany. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts 02141, USA. [4] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. ; Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. ; 1] Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus DK-8000, Denmark. [2] The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, iPSYCH, Aarhus and Copenhagen DK-8000, Denmark. [3] Center for integrated Sequencing, iSEQ, Aarhus University, Aarhus DK-8000, Denmark. ; Department of Psychiatry, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center/GGZ inGeest, Amsterdam 1081 HL, The Netherlands. ; Division of Psychiatry, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, UK. ; 1] Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK. [2] Reta Lila Weston Institute and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; 1] Center for Neuroimaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [2] Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander 39008, Spain. [2] Cibersam (Centro Investigacion Biomedica en Red Salud Mental), Madrid 28029, Spain. ; 1] Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group and Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Institute of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. [2] Center for Translational Research on Adversity, Neurodevelopment and Substance Abuse (C-TRANS), Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21045, USA. ; 1] Umea Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI), Umea University, Umea 901 87, Sweden. [2] Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, 11330 Stockholm, Sweden. ; Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany. ; 1] Multimodal Imaging Laboratory, Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, USA. [2] Department of Cognitive Sciences, University of California, San Diego, California 92161, USA. ; 1] QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia. [2] School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. [3] Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. ; Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald D-17475, Germany. ; 1] Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. [2] Medical and Population Genetics Program, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Boston, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo 0424, Norway. [2] Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo 0373, Norway. ; 1] The Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. ; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. ; Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal H3A 2B4, Canada. ; 1] Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine of the TU Dresden, Dresden 01307 Germany. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] The Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. [2] Department of Psychiatric Research and Development, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo 0319, Norway. ; NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. ; 1] UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom and Epilepsy Society, London WC1N 3BG, UK. [2] Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK. ; Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. [2] Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 06106, USA. ; Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group and Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Institute of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] Brain Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. [2] Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. [3] Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. ; 1] Division of Psychiatry, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, UK. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA. [3] Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut 06106, USA. ; 1] Reta Lila Weston Institute and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. [2] Department of Genetics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia. ; 1] Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78245, USA. [2] University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA. ; 1] National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne 3052, Australia. [2] Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3101, Australia. ; Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Brain Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. [2] Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. [3] Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. [4] Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. ; N.I. Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119333, Russia. ; Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78245, USA. ; 1] Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Biomedicine, University of Basel, Basel 4055, Switzerland. [2] Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Bonn, D-53127, Germany. [3] Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Centre Julich, Julich, D-52425, Germany. [4] Department of Genomics, Life &Brain Center, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53127, Germany. ; School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, CCM, Berlin 10117, Germany. ; Clinical Research Branch, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [2] Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; 1] University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA. [2] South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA. ; Biofunctional Imaging, Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. ; 1] Reta Lila Weston Institute and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. [2] Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3101, Australia. ; 1] Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Reta Lila Weston Institute and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. ; Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17475, Germany. ; Department of Genomics, Life &Brain Center, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53127, Germany. ; Departments of Cognitive and Clinical Neuropsychology, VU University Amsterdam, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ; Interfaculty Institute for Genetics and Functional Genomics, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17489, Germany. ; Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake 470-1192, Japan. ; Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; FMRIB Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ; NICHD Brain and Tissue Bank for Developmental Disorders, University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; 1] School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH, UK. [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; 1] Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney 2031, Australia. [2] School of Medical Sciences, UNSW, Sydney 2052, Australia. ; 1] Human Genetics Branch and Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. [2] Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York 10032, USA. ; Lymphocyte Cell Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. ; Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. ; Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat, Munich 80336, Germany. ; 1] Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Bonn, D-53127, Germany. [2] Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Centre Julich, Julich, D-52425, Germany. [3] Department of Genomics, Life &Brain Center, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53127, Germany. ; 1] FMRIB Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. [2] Department of Statistics &WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. ; 1] Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Bonn, D-53127, Germany. [2] Department of Genomics, Life &Brain Center, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53127, Germany. ; Department of Psychiatry, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. ; Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. ; 1] Cibersam (Centro Investigacion Biomedica en Red Salud Mental), Madrid 28029, Spain. [2] Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; 1] Department of Neurology, University of Calgary, Calgary T2N 2T9, Canada. [2] Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Calgary, Calgary T2N 2T9, Canada. ; Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, California 92617, USA. ; Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo 0373, Norway. ; 1] Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. [2] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of General Psychiatry, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg 69115, Germany. ; Department of Neuropathology, MRC Sudden Death Brain Bank Project, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK. ; Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA. ; Psychology Department and Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30302, USA. ; Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK. ; Genentech, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Psychiatry and Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden 2333 ZA, The Netherlands. ; Neuroimaging Centre, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9713 AW, The Netherlands. ; Department of Psychiatry, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-141 83, Sweden. ; Behavioral Epidemiology Section, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK. ; 1] Center for Integrative and Translational Genomics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, USA. [2] Department of Genetics, Genomics, and Informatics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, USA. [3] Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Medical College of Nantong University, Nantong 226001, China. ; 1] Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group and Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Institute of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. [2] Cognitive Genetics and Therapy Group, School of Psychology &Discipline of Biochemistry, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland. ; 1] Center for Integrative and Translational Genomics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, USA. [2] Department of Genetics, Genomics, and Informatics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee 38163, USA. ; 1] Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. [3] Department of Clinical Genetics, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6200 MD, The Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; 1] Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. [3] Karakter Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. ; 1] The Mind Research Network &LBERI, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106, USA. [2] Department of ECE, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA. ; 1] Center for Translational Imaging and Personalized Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, USA. [2] Departments of Neurosciences, Radiology, Psychiatry, and Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, USA. ; Avera Institute for Human Genetics, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 57108, USA. ; 1] Molecular and Cellular Therapeutics, The Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin 2, Ireland. [2] Neurology Division, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland. ; Department of Neurology, Hopital Erasme, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels 1070, Belgium. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. [2] Department of Medical Genetics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo 0450, Norway. ; 1] Human Genetics Branch and Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. [2] Janssen Research &Development, Johnson &Johnson, Titusville, New Jersey 08560, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] The Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA. ; 1] German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Rostock/Greifswald, Greifswald 17487, Germany. [2] Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald D-17475, Germany. ; 1] Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany. [2] Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich 81377, Germany. [3] University of Liverpool, Institute of Translational Medicine, Liverpool L69 3BX, UK. ; Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17475, Germany. ; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom and Epilepsy Society, London WC1N 3BG, UK. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [2] Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts 02141, USA. [4] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Disease, San Francisco VA Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, California 94121, USA. ; 1] Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam 3000 CB, The Netherlands. [2] Department of Radiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam 3015 CN, The Netherlands. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. [2] Department of Psychiatric Research and Development, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo 0319, Norway. [3] Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-171 76, Sweden. ; 1] Human Genetics Branch and Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. [2] Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland. ; 1] Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. ; 1] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands. [2] Language and Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen 6525 XD, The Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald 17489, Germany. [2] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, HELIOS Hospital Stralsund 18435, Germany. ; 1] Center for Translational Research in Systems Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center, Goettingen 37075, Germany. [2] Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich 80804, Germany. ; Molecular Research Center for Children's Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. ; 1] NORMENT - KG Jebsen Centre, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo N-0316, Norway. [2] Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-171 76, Sweden. ; Medical University of Lodz, Lodz 90-419, Poland. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK. [2] NIHR Dementia Biomedical Research Unit, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; 1] Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. [2] Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia 06156, Italy. ; Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland. ; 1] Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK. [2] Division of Psychiatry, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, UK. ; 1] Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3584 CX, The Netherlands. [2] Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; 1] Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto M6A 2E1, Canada. [2] Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto M5T 1R8, Canada. ; 1] The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto M5G 1X8, Canada. [2] Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3E2, Canada. ; 1] Reta Lila Weston Institute and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK. [2] Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK. ; 1] Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. [2] Neuropsychiatric Institute, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney 2031, Australia. ; 1] Center for Neuroimaging, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [2] Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [3] Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, CCM, Berlin 10117, Germany. ; 1] Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. [2] Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. [3] Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK. ; 1] Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio FI-70211, Finland. [2] Neurocentre Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio FI-70211, Finland. ; Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK. ; 1] Lieber Institute for Brain Development, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. [2] Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, Neuroscience and the Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; 1] Department of Radiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam 3015 CN, The Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam 3015 CN, The Netherlands. ; Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Department of Neurology, Clinical Division of Neurogeriatrics, Medical University Graz, Graz 8010, Austria. ; INSERM U897, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076, France. ; 1] Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. [2] Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts 01702, USA. ; 1] Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA. [2] Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA. [3] Department of Psychology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA. ; General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam 3015 CN, The Netherlands. ; 1] The Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. [2] Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; 1] The Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. [2] Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. [3] Computer Science and AI Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts 02141, USA. ; Department of Neurology University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria. ; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. ; Groupe d'Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, UMR5296 CNRS, CEA and University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076, France. ; Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. ; Icelandic Heart Association, University of Iceland, Faculty of Medicine, Reykjavik 101, Iceland. ; 1] Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. [2] Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA. ; 1] QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane 4006, Australia. [2] School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia. ; 1] Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [2] Department of Psychiatry, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. [3] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 GL, The Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25607358" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Adult ; Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging/genetics ; Apoptosis/genetics ; Brain/*anatomy & histology ; Caudate Nucleus/anatomy & histology ; Child ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Genetic Loci/genetics ; Genetic Variation/*genetics ; *Genome-Wide Association Study ; Hippocampus/anatomy & histology ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/genetics ; Middle Aged ; Organ Size/genetics ; Putamen/anatomy & histology ; Sex Characteristics ; Skull/anatomy & histology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-06-13
    Description: During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Richiardi, Jonas -- Altmann, Andre -- Milazzo, Anna-Clare -- Chang, Catie -- Chakravarty, M Mallar -- Banaschewski, Tobias -- Barker, Gareth J -- Bokde, Arun L W -- Bromberg, Uli -- Buchel, Christian -- Conrod, Patricia -- Fauth-Buhler, Mira -- Flor, Herta -- Frouin, Vincent -- Gallinat, Jurgen -- Garavan, Hugh -- Gowland, Penny -- Heinz, Andreas -- Lemaitre, Herve -- Mann, Karl F -- Martinot, Jean-Luc -- Nees, Frauke -- Paus, Tomas -- Pausova, Zdenka -- Rietschel, Marcella -- Robbins, Trevor W -- Smolka, Michael N -- Spanagel, Rainer -- Strohle, Andreas -- Schumann, Gunter -- Hawrylycz, Mike -- Poline, Jean-Baptiste -- Greicius, Michael D -- IMAGEN consortium -- 93558/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01 MH085772-01A1/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01NS073498/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U54 EB020403/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):1241-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1255905. Epub 2015 Jun 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Laboratory of Neurology and Imaging of Cognition, Department of Neuroscience, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu. ; Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ; The War Related Illness and Injury Study Center, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. ; Advanced MRI Section, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ; Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada. Departments of Psychiatry and Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. ; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. ; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Department of Psychiatry, Universite de Montreal, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal, Canada. ; Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Neurospin, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Paris, France. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. ; Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ; Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM Unit 1000 "Neuroimaging and Psychiatry," University Paris Sud, Orsay, France. INSERM Unit 1000 at Maison de Solenn, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris (APHP), Cochin Hospital, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, France. ; Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. ; The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ; Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. ; Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany. ; Department of Psychopharmacology, Central Institute of Mental Health, Faculty of Clinical Medicine Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany. ; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. Medical Research Council (MRC) Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London, UK. ; Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA, USA. ; Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. ; Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Laboratory, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. jonas.richiardi@unige.ch greicius@stanford.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26068849" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adolescent ; Adult ; Animals ; Brain/metabolism/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Expression ; Humans ; Ion Channels/*genetics ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Mice ; Nerve Net/metabolism/*physiology ; Neural Pathways/metabolism/physiology ; Polymorphism, Genetic ; Rest/*physiology ; Synapses/metabolism/physiology ; *Transcriptome ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Keywords: Germany ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; GENE ; GENES ; PATIENT ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; NO ; etiology ; MARKERS ; REGION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; LEVEL ; analysis ; HAPLOTYPE ; PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS ; USA ; depression ; population-based ; comparison ; quantitative ; ANXIETY ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; VA ; HAPLOTYPE SHARING ANALYSIS ; MAJOR DEPRESSION ; AMINO-ACID OXIDASE ; BIPOLAR-AFFECTIVE-DISORDER ; DAOA/G30 LOCUS ; DIAGNOSTIC BOUNDARIES ; G72/G30 GENE LOCUS ; PERSECUTORY DELUSIONS
    Abstract: Objective: G72 is among the most frequently replicated vulnerability genes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The authors previously found identical haplotypes of markers M23 and M24 to be associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and panic disorder. Given both the well-recognized familial clustering across these disorders and recent linkage findings implicating the region harboring G72 in the etiology of major depression and panic disorder, we can hypothesize that G72 should also be involved in the etiology of major depression. Neuroticism, measuring trait anxiety, may be the endophenotypic link underlying genetic associationswith G72 across diagnostic boundaries. The authors tested whether the previously observed risk haplotypes are also associated with major depression and neuroticism. Method: The authors performed a standard haplotype analysis in a group of 500 major depression patients and 1,030 population-based comparison subjects. The authors also performed an exploratory analysis on 10 additional G72 markers using a novel haplotype-sharing approach. They performed a quantitative trait haplotype analysis in an independent group of 907 individuals phenotyped for neuroticism. Results: The previously identified M23-M24 risk haplotype was significantly associated with major depression and high levels of neuroticism. The haplotype-sharing analysis also implicated the same region, whereas more proximal markers showed no association with major depression. Conclusions: This is the first study to the authors' knowledge to implicate the G72 locus in the etiology of major depression and neuroticism. The results strengthen the notion of a genetic overlap between diagnoses, commonly conceptualized as distinct entities. Neuroticism may constitute the common underlying endophenotypic link
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18346999
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  • 7
    Keywords: DISEASES ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; TRANSPORT ; MOTIF ; GAMMA ; ANNOTATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; WIDE ASSOCIATION ; HAPMAP ; ENRICHMENT ANALYSIS
    Abstract: In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24901509
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  • 8
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; RESPONSES ; ASSOCIATION ; ethanol ; CONSUMPTION ; CANDIDATE GENES ; PROTEIN-INTERACTION NETWORKS ; VULNERABILITY ; LOW-LEVEL ; PREFERRING RATS
    Abstract: Genetic factors have as large role as environmental factors in the etiology of alcohol dependence (AD). Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enable systematic searches for loci not hitherto implicated in the etiology of AD, many true findings may be missed owing to correction for multiple testing. The aim of the present study was to circumvent this limitation by searching for biological system-level differences, and then following up these findings in humans and animals. Gene-set-based analysis of GWAS data from 1333 cases and 2168 controls identified 19 significantly associated gene-sets, of which 5 could be replicated in an independent sample. Clustered in these gene-sets were novel and previously identified susceptibility genes. The most frequently present gene, ie in 6 out of 19 gene-sets, was X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 5 (XRCC5). Previous human and animal studies have implicated XRCC5 in alcohol sensitivity. This phenotype is inversely correlated with the development of AD, presumably as more alcohol is required to achieve the desired effects. In the present study, the functional role of XRCC5 in AD was further validated in animals and humans. Drosophila mutants with reduced function of Ku80-the homolog of mammalian XRCC5-due to RNAi silencing showed reduced sensitivity to ethanol. In humans with free access to intravenous ethanol self-administration in the laboratory, the maximum achieved blood alcohol concentration was influenced in an allele-dose-dependent manner by genetic variation in XRCC5. In conclusion, our convergent approach identified new candidates and generated independent evidence for the involvement of XRCC5 in alcohol dependence.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25035082
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  • 9
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling is a behavioural addiction with negative economic, social, and psychological consequences. Identification of contributing genes and pathways may improve understanding of aetiology and facilitate therapy and prevention. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study of pathological gambling. Our aims were to identify pathways involved in pathological gambling, and examine whether there is a genetic overlap between pathological gambling and alcohol dependence. METHODS: Four hundred and forty-five individuals with a diagnosis of pathological gambling according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were recruited in Germany, and 986 controls were drawn from a German general population sample. A genome-wide association study of pathological gambling comprising single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses, was performed. Polygenic risk scores were generated using data from a German genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence. RESULTS: No genome-wide significant association with pathological gambling was found for single markers or genes. Pathways for Huntington's disease (P-value=6.63x10(-3)); 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signalling (P-value=9.57x10(-3)); and apoptosis (P-value=1.75x10(-2)) were significant. Polygenic risk score analysis of the alcohol dependence dataset yielded a one-sided nominal significant P-value in subjects with pathological gambling, irrespective of comorbid alcohol dependence status. CONCLUSIONS: The present results accord with previous quantitative formal genetic studies which showed genetic overlap between non-substance- and substance-related addictions. Furthermore, pathway analysis suggests shared pathology between Huntington's disease and pathological gambling. This finding is consistent with previous imaging studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27315593
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  • 10
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENE ; TIME ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; PATTERNS ; STRESS-RESPONSE ; DNA-BINDING ; ethanol ; INDIVIDUALS ; ALCOHOL ; CHILDREN ; PREVALENCE ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; ENHANCER ; DISORDERS ; ADULTS ; DEPENDENCE ; MICE LACKING ; haplotype-tagging ; alcohol consumption ; animal model ; HORMONE-RECEPTOR ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SP1 ; ADOLESCENTS ; AFFECTIVE-DISORDERS ; CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-FACTOR ; EARLY ADULTHOOD ; HPA-axis
    Abstract: To investigate the role of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) in patterns of human alcohol drinking and its potential contribution to alcohol dependence, we analysed two independent samples: a sample of adolescents, which consisted of individuals from the 'Mannheim Study of Risk Children' (MARC), who had little previous exposure to alcohol, and a sample of alcohol-dependent adults, who met DSM-IV criteria of alcohol dependence. Following determination of allelic frequencies of 14 polymorphisms of the CRHR1 gene, two haplotype tagging (ht)SNPs discriminating between haplotypes with a frequency of 〉= 0.7% were identified. Both samples were genotyped and systematically examined for association with the htSNPs of CRHR1. In the adolescent sample, significant group differences between genotypes were observed in binge drinking, lifetime prevalence of alcohol intake and lifetime prevalence of drunkenness. The sample of adult alcohol-dependent patients showed association of CRHR1 with high amount of drinking. This is the first time that an association of CRHR1 with specific patterns of alcohol consumption has been reported. Our findings support results from animal models, suggesting an importance of CRHR1 in integrating gene environment effects in alcohol use disorders
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16550213
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