Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-11-15
    Description: Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism is an “old school” reliable technique for swift microbial community screening in anaerobic digestion Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism is an “old school” reliable technique for swift microbial community screening in anaerobic digestion, Published online: 14 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-34921-7 Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism is an “old school” reliable technique for swift microbial community screening in anaerobic digestion
    Electronic ISSN: 2045-2322
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-10-25
    Description: Members of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) family, a large group of polymorphic receptors expressed on natural killer (NK) cells, recognize particular peptide-laden human leukocyte antigen (pHLA) class I molecules and have a pivotal role in innate immune responses. Allelic variation and extensive polymorphism within the three-domain KIR family (KIR3D, domains D0-D1-D2) affects pHLA binding specificity and is linked to the control of viral replication and the treatment outcome of certain haematological malignancies. Here we describe the structure of a human KIR3DL1 receptor bound to HLA-B*5701 complexed with a self-peptide. KIR3DL1 clamped around the carboxy-terminal end of the HLA-B*5701 antigen-binding cleft, resulting in two discontinuous footprints on the pHLA. First, the D0 domain, a distinguishing feature of the KIR3D family, extended towards beta2-microglobulin and abutted a region of the HLA molecule with limited polymorphism, thereby acting as an 'innate HLA sensor' domain. Second, whereas the D2-HLA-B*5701 interface exhibited a high degree of complementarity, the D1-pHLA-B*5701 contacts were suboptimal and accommodated a degree of sequence variation both within the peptide and the polymorphic region of the HLA molecule. Although the two-domain KIR (KIR2D) and KIR3DL1 docked similarly onto HLA-C and HLA-B respectively, the corresponding D1-mediated interactions differed markedly, thereby providing insight into the specificity of KIR3DL1 for discrete HLA-A and HLA-B allotypes. Collectively, in association with extensive mutagenesis studies at the KIR3DL1-pHLA-B*5701 interface, we provide a framework for understanding the intricate interplay between peptide variability, KIR3D and HLA polymorphism in determining the specificity requirements of this essential innate interaction that is conserved across primate species.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723390/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723390/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Vivian, Julian P -- Duncan, Renee C -- Berry, Richard -- O'Connor, Geraldine M -- Reid, Hugh H -- Beddoe, Travis -- Gras, Stephanie -- Saunders, Philippa M -- Olshina, Maya A -- Widjaja, Jacqueline M L -- Harpur, Christopher M -- Lin, Jie -- Maloveste, Sebastien M -- Price, David A -- Lafont, Bernard A P -- McVicar, Daniel W -- Clements, Craig S -- Brooks, Andrew G -- Rossjohn, Jamie -- G0501963/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- ZIA AI001026-04/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 23;479(7373):401-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10517.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22020283" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Binding Sites/genetics ; HLA-B Antigens/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/immunology ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, KIR3DL1/*chemistry/genetics/*immunology ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; beta 2-Microglobulin/chemistry/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-07-24
    Description: The identification of somatic activating mutations in JAK2 (refs 1-4) and in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL) in most patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) led to the clinical development of JAK2 kinase inhibitors. JAK2 inhibitor therapy improves MPN-associated splenomegaly and systemic symptoms but does not significantly decrease or eliminate the MPN clone in most patients with MPN. We therefore sought to characterize mechanisms by which MPN cells persist despite chronic inhibition of JAK2. Here we show that JAK2 inhibitor persistence is associated with reactivation of JAK-STAT signalling and with heterodimerization between activated JAK2 and JAK1 or TYK2, consistent with activation of JAK2 in trans by other JAK kinases. Further, this phenomenon is reversible: JAK2 inhibitor withdrawal is associated with resensitization to JAK2 kinase inhibitors and with reversible changes in JAK2 expression. We saw increased JAK2 heterodimerization and sustained JAK2 activation in cell lines, in murine models and in patients treated with JAK2 inhibitors. RNA interference and pharmacological studies show that JAK2-inhibitor-persistent cells remain dependent on JAK2 protein expression. Consequently, therapies that result in JAK2 degradation retain efficacy in persistent cells and may provide additional benefit to patients with JAK2-dependent malignancies treated with JAK2 inhibitors.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991463/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991463/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Koppikar, Priya -- Bhagwat, Neha -- Kilpivaara, Outi -- Manshouri, Taghi -- Adli, Mazhar -- Hricik, Todd -- Liu, Fan -- Saunders, Lindsay M -- Mullally, Ann -- Abdel-Wahab, Omar -- Leung, Laura -- Weinstein, Abby -- Marubayashi, Sachie -- Goel, Aviva -- Gonen, Mithat -- Estrov, Zeev -- Ebert, Benjamin L -- Chiosis, Gabriela -- Nimer, Stephen D -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Verstovsek, Srdan -- Levine, Ross L -- 1R01CA151949-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA151949/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Sep 6;489(7414):155-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11303.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22820254" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; Disease Models, Animal ; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects ; Enzyme Activation/drug effects ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Granulocytes/drug effects/enzymology/metabolism ; HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Humans ; Janus Kinase 1/biosynthesis/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Janus Kinase 2/*antagonists & inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Mice ; Myeloproliferative Disorders/*drug therapy/enzymology/metabolism/pathology ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Biosynthesis ; *Protein Multimerization ; RNA Interference ; STAT Transcription Factors/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction/drug effects ; TYK2 Kinase/biosynthesis/deficiency/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-06-28
    Description: Patient mortality rates have remained stubbornly high (40%) for the past 35 years in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) due to inherent or acquired drug resistance. Thus, a critical issue in advanced SCC is to identify and target the mechanisms that contribute to therapy resistance. We report that the transcriptional inhibitor, E2F7, is mislocalized to the cytoplasm in 〉80% of human HNSCCs, whereas the transcriptional activator, E2F1, retains localization to the nucleus in SCC. This results in an imbalance in the control of E2F-dependent targets such as SPHK1 , which is derepressed and drives resistance to anthracyclines in HNSCC. Specifically, we show that (i) E2F7 is subject to exportin 1 (XPO1)–dependent nuclear export, (ii) E2F7 is selectively mislocalized in most of SCC and multiple other tumor types, (iii) mislocalization of E2F7 in HNSCC causes derepression of Sphk1 and drives anthracycline resistance, and (iv) anthracycline resistance can be reversed with a clinically available inhibitor of XPO1, selinexor, in xenotransplant models of HNSCC. Thus, we have identified a strategy to repurpose anthracyclines for use in SCC. More generally, we provide a strategy to restore the balance of E2F1 (activator) and E2F7 (inhibitor) activity in cancer.
    Print ISSN: 1946-6234
    Electronic ISSN: 1946-6242
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that mediate magnetosensation in vertebrates is a formidable scientific problem. One hypothesis is that magnetic information is transduced into neuronal impulses by using a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor. Previous studies claim to have identified a magnetic sense system in the pigeon, common to avian species, which consists of magnetite-containing trigeminal afferents located at six specific loci in the rostral subepidermis of the beak. These studies have been widely accepted in the field and heavily relied upon by both behavioural biologists and physicists. Here we show that clusters of iron-rich cells in the rostro-medial upper beak of the pigeon Columbia livia are macrophages, not magnetosensitive neurons. Our systematic characterization of the pigeon upper beak identified iron-rich cells in the stratum laxum of the subepidermis, the basal region of the respiratory epithelium and the apex of feather follicles. Using a three-dimensional blueprint of the pigeon beak created by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, we mapped the location of iron-rich cells, revealing unexpected variation in their distribution and number--an observation that is inconsistent with a role in magnetic sensation. Ultrastructure analysis of these cells, which are not unique to the beak, showed that their subcellular architecture includes ferritin-like granules, siderosomes, haemosiderin and filopodia, characteristics of iron-rich macrophages. Our conclusion that these cells are macrophages and not magnetosensitive neurons is supported by immunohistological studies showing co-localization with the antigen-presenting molecule major histocompatibility complex class II. Our work necessitates a renewed search for the true magnetite-dependent magnetoreceptor in birds.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Treiber, Christoph Daniel -- Salzer, Marion Claudia -- Riegler, Johannes -- Edelman, Nathaniel -- Sugar, Cristina -- Breuss, Martin -- Pichler, Paul -- Cadiou, Herve -- Saunders, Martin -- Lythgoe, Mark -- Shaw, Jeremy -- Keays, David Anthony -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 11;484(7394):367-70. doi: 10.1038/nature11046.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Molecular Pathology, Dr Bohr-Gasse, 1030 Vienna, Austria.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495303" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animal Migration ; Animals ; Beak/anatomy & histology/*cytology ; Columbidae/*anatomy & histology/physiology ; Feathers/cytology/ultrastructure ; Ferrocyanides/analysis ; Immunohistochemistry ; Iron/analysis/*metabolism ; Macrophages/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; *Magnetic Fields ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Neurons/metabolism ; Orientation ; Respiratory Mucosa/cytology/ultrastructure ; *Sensation ; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-23
    Description: Mitochondrial apoptosis is mediated by BAK and BAX, two proteins that induce mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, leading to cytochrome c release and activation of apoptotic caspases. In the absence of active caspases, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) triggers the innate immune cGAS/STING pathway, causing dying cells to secrete type I interferon. How cGAS gains access to mtDNA remains unclear. We used live-cell lattice light-sheet microscopy to examine the mitochondrial network in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We found that after BAK/BAX activation and cytochrome c loss, the mitochondrial network broke down and large BAK/BAX pores appeared in the outer membrane. These BAK/BAX macropores allowed the inner mitochondrial membrane to herniate into the cytosol, carrying with it mitochondrial matrix components, including the mitochondrial genome. Apoptotic caspases did not prevent herniation but dismantled the dying cell to suppress mtDNA-induced innate immune signaling.
    Keywords: Cell Biology, Online Only
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-04-24
    Description: Pathogens play an important part in shaping the structure and dynamics of natural communities, because species are not affected by them equally. A shared goal of ecology and epidemiology is to predict when a species is most vulnerable to disease. A leading hypothesis asserts that the impact of disease should increase with host abundance, producing a 'rare-species advantage'. However, the impact of a pathogen may be decoupled from host abundance, because most pathogens infect more than one species, leading to pathogen spillover onto closely related species. Here we show that the phylogenetic and ecological structure of the surrounding community can be important predictors of disease pressure. We found that the amount of tissue lost to disease increased with the relative abundance of a species across a grassland plant community, and that this rare-species advantage had an additional phylogenetic component: disease pressure was stronger on species with many close relatives. We used a global model of pathogen sharing as a function of relatedness between hosts, which provided a robust predictor of relative disease pressure at the local scale. In our grassland, the total amount of disease was most accurately explained not by the abundance of the focal host alone, but by the abundance of all species in the community weighted by their phylogenetic distance to the host. Furthermore, the model strongly predicted observed disease pressure for 44 novel host species we introduced experimentally to our study site, providing evidence for a mechanism to explain why phylogenetically rare species are more likely to become invasive when introduced. Our results demonstrate how the phylogenetic and ecological structure of communities can have a key role in disease dynamics, with implications for the maintenance of biodiversity, biotic resistance against introduced weeds, and the success of managed plants in agriculture and forestry.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Parker, Ingrid M -- Saunders, Megan -- Bontrager, Megan -- Weitz, Andrew P -- Hendricks, Rebecca -- Magarey, Roger -- Suiter, Karl -- Gilbert, Gregory S -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 23;520(7548):542-4. doi: 10.1038/nature14372.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA [2] Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Republica de Panama ; Department of Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; Center for Integrated Pest Management, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27606, USA. ; 1] Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Republica de Panama [2] Department of Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25903634" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Biodiversity ; California ; Databases, Factual ; *Grassland ; Introduced Species/trends ; *Phylogeny ; Plant Diseases/*statistics & numerical data ; Plants/*classification ; Population Density
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Ultramicroscopy 45 (1992), S. 241-251 
    ISSN: 0304-3991
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    ISSN: 0304-3991
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Electrical Engineering, Measurement and Control Technology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Physica B+C 129 (1985), S. 260-264 
    ISSN: 0378-4363
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...