Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: Norovirus gastroenteritis is a major public health burden worldwide. Although fecal shedding is important for transmission of enteric viruses, little is known about the immune factors that restrict persistent enteric infection. We report here that although the cytokines interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and IFN-beta prevented the systemic spread of murine norovirus (MNoV), only IFN-lambda controlled persistent enteric infection. Infection-dependent induction of IFN-lambda was governed by the MNoV capsid protein and correlated with diminished enteric persistence. Treatment of established infection with IFN-lambda cured mice in a manner requiring nonhematopoietic cell expression of the IFN-lambda receptor, Ifnlr1, and independent of adaptive immunity. These results suggest the therapeutic potential of IFN-lambda for curing virus infections in the gastrointestinal tract.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398891/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398891/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nice, Timothy J -- Baldridge, Megan T -- McCune, Broc T -- Norman, Jason M -- Lazear, Helen M -- Artyomov, Maxim -- Diamond, Michael S -- Virgin, Herbert W -- 5T32A100716334/PHS HHS/ -- 5T32AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5T32CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31CA177194-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084887/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI106772/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI109725/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):269-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1258100. Epub 2014 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. virgin@wustl.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431489" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptive Immunity ; Animals ; Caliciviridae Infections/*drug therapy/*immunology/virology ; Capsid Proteins/immunology/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Cytokines/biosynthesis/*immunology/*therapeutic use ; Feces/virology ; Gastroenteritis/drug therapy/*immunology/virology ; Immunity, Innate ; Interferon-alpha/biosynthesis/immunology ; Interferon-beta/biosynthesis/immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Norovirus/*immunology/*physiology ; Virus Replication ; Virus Shedding
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-02-18
    Description: The proliferation of genetically modified mouse models has exposed phenotypic variation between investigators and institutions that has been challenging to control. In many cases, the microbiota is the presumed cause of the variation. Current solutions to account for phenotypic variability include littermate and maternal controls or defined microbial consortia in gnotobiotic mice. In conventionally raised mice, the microbiome is transmitted from the dam. Here we show that microbially driven dichotomous faecal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) levels in wild-type mice within the same facility mimic the effects of chromosomal mutations. We observe in multiple facilities that vertically transmissible bacteria in IgA-low mice dominantly lower faecal IgA levels in IgA-high mice after co-housing or faecal transplantation. In response to injury, IgA-low mice show increased damage that is transferable by faecal transplantation and driven by faecal IgA differences. We find that bacteria from IgA-low mice degrade the secretory component of secretory IgA as well as IgA itself. These data indicate that phenotypic comparisons between mice must take into account the non-chromosomal hereditary variation between different breeders. We propose faecal IgA as one marker of microbial variability and conclude that co-housing and/or faecal transplantation enables analysis of progeny from different dams.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425643/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4425643/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Moon, Clara -- Baldridge, Megan T -- Wallace, Meghan A -- Burnham, Carey-Ann D -- Virgin, Herbert W -- Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S -- AI08488702/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DK7161907/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK052574/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30AR048335/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- P30DK052574/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071619/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK097079/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK101354/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 OD011170/OD/NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 7;521(7550):90-3. doi: 10.1038/nature14139. Epub 2015 Feb 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25686606" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: The capacity of human norovirus (NoV), which causes 〉90% of global epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis, to infect a subset of people persistently may contribute to its spread. How such enteric viruses establish persistent infections is not well understood. We found that antibiotics prevented persistent murine norovirus (MNoV) infection, an effect that was reversed by replenishment of the bacterial microbiota. Antibiotics did not prevent tissue infection or affect systemic viral replication but acted specifically in the intestine. The receptor for the antiviral cytokine interferon-lambda, Ifnlr1, as well as the transcription factors Stat1 and Irf3, were required for antibiotics to prevent viral persistence. Thus, the bacterial microbiome fosters enteric viral persistence in a manner counteracted by specific components of the innate immune system.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4409937/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4409937/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Baldridge, Megan T -- Nice, Timothy J -- McCune, Broc T -- Yokoyama, Christine C -- Kambal, Amal -- Wheadon, Michael -- Diamond, Michael S -- Ivanova, Yulia -- Artyomov, Maxim -- Virgin, Herbert W -- 1F31CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5T32AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 5T32CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA177194/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI084887/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007163/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009547/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI083019/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI106772/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI109725/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):266-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1258025. Epub 2014 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Departments of Medicine and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. virgin@wustl.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25431490" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology ; Caliciviridae Infections/drug therapy/immunology/microbiology/*virology ; Cytokines/*physiology ; Female ; Gastroenteritis/drug therapy/immunology/microbiology/*virology ; Intestines/*microbiology/virology ; Male ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; *Microbiota/drug effects ; Norovirus/immunology/*physiology ; Receptors, Cytokine/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; *Symbiosis ; Viral Load ; Virus Replication ; Virus Shedding
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-04-13
    Description: Complex interactions between host immunity and the microbiome regulate norovirus infection. However, the mechanism of host immune promotion of enteric virus infection remains obscure. The cellular tropism of noroviruses is also unknown. Recently, we identified CD300lf as a murine norovirus (MNoV) receptor. In this study, we have shown that tuft cells, a rare type of intestinal epithelial cell, express CD300lf and are the target cell for MNoV in the mouse intestine. We found that type 2 cytokines, which induce tuft cell proliferation, promote MNoV infection in vivo. These cytokines can replace the effect of commensal microbiota in promoting virus infection. Our work thus provides insight into how the immune system and microbes can coordinately promote enteric viral infection.
    Keywords: Microbiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Society of Hematology (ASH)
    In: Blood
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: Recent studies have revealed that the intestinal bacterial microbiome plays an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. A correlation between adverse hematologic effects and imbalance of the intestinal microbiome, or dysbiosis, is evident in several human conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and, critically, in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Here we review the effects of gut dysbiosis on the hematological compartment and our current understanding of the mechanisms through which changes in the bacterial microbiome affect hematopoiesis.
    Keywords: Hematopoiesis and Stem Cells, Blood Spotlight
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...