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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-10-30
    Description: Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with severe human diseases and are maternally inherited through the egg's cytoplasm. Here we investigated the feasibility of mtDNA replacement in human oocytes by spindle transfer (ST; also called spindle-chromosomal complex transfer). Of 106 human oocytes donated for research, 65 were subjected to reciprocal ST and 33 served as controls. Fertilization rate in ST oocytes (73%) was similar to controls (75%); however, a significant portion of ST zygotes (52%) showed abnormal fertilization as determined by an irregular number of pronuclei. Among normally fertilized ST zygotes, blastocyst development (62%) and embryonic stem cell isolation (38%) rates were comparable to controls. All embryonic stem cell lines derived from ST zygotes had normal euploid karyotypes and contained exclusively donor mtDNA. The mtDNA can be efficiently replaced in human oocytes. Although some ST oocytes displayed abnormal fertilization, remaining embryos were capable of developing to blastocysts and producing embryonic stem cells similar to controls.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561483/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561483/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tachibana, Masahito -- Amato, Paula -- Sparman, Michelle -- Woodward, Joy -- Sanchis, Dario Melguizo -- Ma, Hong -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Kang, Eunju -- Lee, Hyo-Sang -- Ramsey, Cathy -- Masterson, Keith -- Battaglia, David -- Lee, David -- Wu, Diana -- Jensen, Jeffrey -- Patton, Phillip -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Stouffer, Richard -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- 8P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51 RR000163/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 31;493(7434):627-31. doi: 10.1038/nature11647. Epub 2012 Oct 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103867" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Animals ; Cell Nucleus/genetics ; Cryopreservation ; Cytoplasm/genetics ; DNA, Mitochondrial/analysis/genetics ; Embryo, Mammalian/embryology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Fertilization ; *Genetic Therapy ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta/genetics/growth & development ; Microsatellite Repeats/genetics ; Mitochondrial Diseases/*genetics/*therapy ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/*standards ; Oocytes/cytology ; Pregnancy ; Young Adult ; Zygote/cytology/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: The modification of DNA by 5-methylcytosine (5mC) has essential roles in cell differentiation and development through epigenetic gene regulation. 5mC can be converted to another modified base, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), by the tet methylcytosine dioxygenase (Tet) family of enzymes. Notably, the balance between 5hmC and 5mC in the genome is linked with cell-differentiation processes such as pluripotency and lineage commitment. We have previously reported that the maternal factor PGC7 (also known as Dppa3, Stella) is required for the maintenance of DNA methylation in early embryogenesis, and protects 5mC from conversion to 5hmC in the maternal genome. Here we show that PGC7 protects 5mC from Tet3-mediated conversion to 5hmC by binding to maternal chromatin containing dimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) in mice. In addition, imprinted loci that are marked with H3K9me2 in mature sperm are protected by PGC7 binding in early embryogenesis. This type of regulatory mechanism could be involved in DNA modifications in somatic cells as well as in early embryos.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Nakamura, Toshinobu -- Liu, Yu-Jung -- Nakashima, Hiroyuki -- Umehara, Hiroki -- Inoue, Kimiko -- Matoba, Shogo -- Tachibana, Makoto -- Ogura, Atsuo -- Shinkai, Yoichi -- Nakano, Toru -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jun 3;486(7403):415-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11093.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. tnakamura@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722204" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 5-Methylcytosine/*metabolism ; Animals ; Chromatin/chemistry/metabolism ; Cytosine/*analogs & derivatives/metabolism ; DNA Methylation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/embryology/*metabolism ; Embryonic Development ; Female ; Genomic Imprinting/genetics ; Histones/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Lysine/chemistry/metabolism ; Male ; Methylation ; Mice ; Protein Binding/drug effects ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/metabolism ; RNA, Long Noncoding ; RNA, Untranslated/genetics ; Repressor Proteins/*metabolism ; Spermatozoa/metabolism ; ras-GRF1/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Background Infants 〈6 months of age are too young to receive influenza vaccine, despite being at high risk for severe influenza-related complications. Methods To examine the effectiveness of maternal influenza vaccination in preventing influenza in their infants, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 3441 infants born at participating hospitals before the 2013–2014 influenza season. At the time of recruitment, their mothers completed a questionnaire about influenza vaccination status for the 2013–2014 season. A follow-up survey was conducted after the end of the 2013–2014 season to collect information regarding influenza diagnosis and hospitalization among infants. Results During the 2013–2014 influenza season, 71 infants (2%) had influenza diagnosed, and 13 infants (0.4%) were hospitalized with influenza. Maternal influenza vaccination (especially prenatal vaccination) decreased the odds of influenza among infants. The effectiveness of prenatal vaccination was 61% (95% confidence interval, 16%–81%), whereas that of postpartum vaccination was 53% (−28%–83%). Although maternal influenza vaccination was also associated with a decreased odds of influenza-related hospitalization among infants, vaccine effectiveness (73%) did not reach statistical significance, owing to the limited number of infants hospitalized because of influenza. Conclusions The present findings indicated that pregnant women and postpartum women should receive influenza vaccination to protect their infants.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1899
    Electronic ISSN: 1537-6613
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-02-10
    Description: M cells are located in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) that covers Peyer’s patches (PPs) and are responsible for the uptake of intestinal antigens. The differentiation of M cells is initiated by receptor activator of NF-B. However, the intracellular pathways involved in M cell differentiation are still elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that the NF-B pathway activated by RANK is essential for M cell differentiation using in vitro organoid culture. Overexpression of NF-B transcription factors enhances the expression of M cell–associated molecules but is not sufficient to complete M cell differentiation. Furthermore, we evaluated the requirement for tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Conditional deletion of TRAF6 in the intestinal epithelium causes a complete loss of M cells in PPs, resulting in impaired antigen uptake into PPs. In addition, the expression of FAE-associated genes is almost silenced in TRAF6-deficient mice. This study thus demonstrates the crucial role of TRAF6-mediated NF-B signaling in the development of M cells and FAE.
    Keywords: Infectious Disease and Host Defense, Mucosal Immunology
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-07-11
    Description: Human pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, but available cell types have significant limitations. Although embryonic stem cells (ES cells) from in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF ES cells) represent the 'gold standard', they are allogeneic to patients. Autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations. To determine whether such abnormalities are intrinsic to somatic cell reprogramming or secondary to the reprogramming method, genetically matched sets of human IVF ES cells, iPS cells and nuclear transfer ES cells (NT ES cells) derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were subjected to genome-wide analyses. Both NT ES cells and iPS cells derived from the same somatic cells contained comparable numbers of de novo copy number variations. In contrast, DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles of NT ES cells corresponded closely to those of IVF ES cells, whereas iPS cells differed and retained residual DNA methylation patterns typical of parental somatic cells. Thus, human somatic cells can be faithfully reprogrammed to pluripotency by SCNT and are therefore ideal for cell replacement therapies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Morey, Robert -- O'Neil, Ryan C -- He, Yupeng -- Daughtry, Brittany -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Nery, Joseph R -- Castanon, Rosa -- Sabatini, Karen -- Thiagarajan, Rathi D -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Kang, Eunju -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Polat, Alim -- Sugawara, Atsushi -- Sparman, Michelle -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Laurent, Louise C -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 10;511(7508):177-83. doi: 10.1038/nature13551. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Bioinformatics Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Miyagi Medical Center, Shibata-gun, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan (M.T.); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden (A.P.). ; Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; University Pathologists LLC, Boston University School of Medicine, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island 02118, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3] Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA Methylation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genomic Imprinting ; Humans ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/standards ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Successful mammalian cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into unfertilized, metaphase II (MII)-arrested oocytes attests to the cytoplasmic presence of reprogramming factors capable of inducing totipotency in somatic cell nuclei. However, these poorly defined maternal factors presumably decline sharply after fertilization, as the cytoplasm of pronuclear-stage zygotes is reportedly inactive. Recent evidence suggests that zygotic cytoplasm, if maintained at metaphase, can also support derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells after SCNT, albeit at low efficiency. This led to the conclusion that critical oocyte reprogramming factors present in the metaphase but not in the interphase cytoplasm are 'trapped' inside the nucleus during interphase and effectively removed during enucleation. Here we investigated the presence of reprogramming activity in the cytoplasm of interphase two-cell mouse embryos (I2C). First, the presence of candidate reprogramming factors was documented in both intact and enucleated metaphase and interphase zygotes and two-cell embryos. Consequently, enucleation did not provide a likely explanation for the inability of interphase cytoplasm to induce reprogramming. Second, when we carefully synchronized the cell cycle stage between the transplanted nucleus (ES cell, fetal fibroblast or terminally differentiated cumulus cell) and the recipient I2C cytoplasm, the reconstructed SCNT embryos developed into blastocysts and ES cells capable of contributing to traditional germline and tetraploid chimaeras. Last, direct transfer of cloned embryos, reconstructed with ES cell nuclei, into recipients resulted in live offspring. Thus, the cytoplasm of I2C supports efficient reprogramming, with cell cycle synchronization between the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplasm as the most critical parameter determining success. The ability to use interphase cytoplasm in SCNT could aid efforts to generate autologous human ES cells for regenerative applications, as donated or discarded embryos are more accessible than unfertilized MII oocytes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Eunju -- Wu, Guangming -- Ma, Hong -- Li, Ying -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Sparman, Michelle -- Wolf, Don P -- Scholer, Hans R -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- P51 OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):101-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13134. Epub 2014 Mar 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Munster 48149, Germany. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] South Miyagi Medical Center, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670652" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Cloning, Organism ; Cytoplasm/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/*cytology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology ; Female ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology ; *Interphase ; Male ; Metaphase ; Mice ; *Nuclear Transfer Techniques
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-09-07
    Description: Developmental gene expression is defined through cross-talk between the function of transcription factors and epigenetic status, including histone modification. Although several transcription factors play crucial roles in mammalian sex determination, how epigenetic regulation contributes to this process remains unknown. We observed male-to-female sex reversal in mice lacking the H3K9 demethylase Jmjd1a and found that Jmjd1a regulates expression of the mammalian Y chromosome sex-determining gene Sry. Jmjd1a directly and positively controls Sry expression by regulating H3K9me2 marks. These studies reveal a pivotal role of histone demethylation in mammalian sex determination.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kuroki, Shunsuke -- Matoba, Shogo -- Akiyoshi, Mika -- Matsumura, Yasuko -- Miyachi, Hitoshi -- Mise, Nathan -- Abe, Kuniya -- Ogura, Atsuo -- Wilhelm, Dagmar -- Koopman, Peter -- Nozaki, Masami -- Kanai, Yoshiakira -- Shinkai, Yoichi -- Tachibana, Makoto -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Sep 6;341(6150):1106-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1239864.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Experimental Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Shogoin, Kawara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24009392" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Epididymis/abnormalities ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental ; Histones/*metabolism ; Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics/*metabolism ; Male ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Mice, Transgenic ; Ovary/abnormalities/enzymology ; *Protein Processing, Post-Translational ; Sex Determination Processes/*genetics ; Testis/abnormalities/enzymology ; Uterus/abnormalities
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0167-4889
    Keywords: (Rat hepatocyte) ; 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol ; Arachidonic acid ; Ketogenesis ; Oleate metabolism ; Phospholipase A"2 ; Phospholipase C
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0168-583X
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0169-5983
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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